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Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti

Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lorsque la capitale ukrainienne a sombré dans la violence après plusieurs semaines d'un bras de fer entre forces de l'ordre et manifestants pro-européens, le 22 janvier 2014,  les affrontements du centre-ville, notamment sur la place de l'Indépendance ont pris l'allure d'un champ de bataille cinématographique. 

 

Jamais la presse n'avait reçu des photographies aussi "belles" et "picturales". La photographie la plus emblématique qui a fait le tour du monde, est celle du photographe Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti.

Photo report's insight:

Autres photos sur le site du Monde : 
http://www.lemonde.fr/europe/visuel/2014/01/23/la-semaine-ou-kiev-s-est-embrasee_4353592_3214.html ;

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$1.2 million jury verdict in the Morel v. AFP copyright infringement case

$1.2 million jury verdict in the Morel v. AFP copyright infringement case | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
©DANIEL MORELOne of the eight images by Daniel Morel of the aftermath of the January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake that was distributed without permission by AFP and Getty Images.

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"Photographer Daniel Morel says his decisive victory in court last week against Agence France Presse (AFP) and Getty images was not only vindication for him, but a victory for all photographers trying to eke out a living in the digital age.

A federal jury awarded Morel $1.2 million in damages after determining that both agencies willfully infringed his copyrights in 2010 by distributing eight of his exclusive news images of the Haiti earthquake without permission. 

"I hope the internet is going to be a little safer now for all artists, all photographers," he told PDN the day after the jury reached its verdict.

Morel also said he took personal satisfaction in defeating the teams of lawyers from AFP and Getty that he has been fighting for nearly four years." - PDNONLINE

- See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/news/Morel-v-AFP-Copyrig-9598.shtml#sthash.0OsQzG6D.dpuf"

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Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta

Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I went to Jakarta’s business district to find photos of middle-class workers returning to their homes. When I had finished, I realized that I had something different to shoot for the next day. I searched Google maps to find the location of the collapsed bridge but I couldn’t find the exact location. There was a blank map with only the name of the village, Sanghiang Tanjung. Surprisingly, it said the village was just 130 kms (80 miles) away from our Jakarta office – a travel time of about two hours. My estimation was it would take 4 hours.

 

3am Thursday morning, my friend and driver Soewarno and I headed to the village. We reached by 6am. But the difficulty was this village was just a blank area on the map. Also, we had to find the right direction that the students would take, so that I could take a pictures from the front, not from the back. We found many roads in the village but no one knew where the bridge was. With the help of my friends, we were able to get the name of the head of the village, Epi Sopian, who accompanied us to the location. Edi said the bridge collapsed during Saturday’s big flood when wood and bamboo hit the suspension bridge’s pillar.

 

I arrived at the location as the students were crossing. They were already in the middle of the bridge. Oh no, these could not be the children who wanted to go to school, I thought! It was more like an acrobatic show the collapsed bridge as an apparatus and without any safety device at all. They walked slowly, sometimes screaming as their shoes slipped. Suddenly the rain came. A last group of students, Sofiah and her friend, were on the bridge. Happily, all the students crossed safely. I took pictures for no more than five minutes. (...)

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India stray dogs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

India stray dogs | Photographer:  Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

English:
"No country has as many stray dogs as India, and no country suffers as much from them. Free-roaming dogs number in the tens of millions and bite millions of people annually, including vast numbers of children. An estimated 20,000 people die every year from rabies infections — more than a third of the global rabies toll."

 - Serge BouvetFrançais: 
"Chaque année, 30.000 personnes meurent chaque année de la rage en Inde (70% des décès dans le monde) à cause de la morsure de chiens parias. Il est estimé qu’en Inde, une personne meurt de la rage à tous les 30 minutes. Environ 70% des victimes sont des enfants de moins de 15 ans."- Serge Bouvet

 

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Congo (Belge) | Photographer: Carl de Keyzer

Congo (Belge) | Photographer: Carl de Keyzer | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As a member of Magnum for almost 20 years, Belgian photographer Carl de Keyzer has published several books, shooting projects across the globe in Europe, Russia, Asia, and the U.S. His strength lies in his ability to consistently capture pointed, expressive moments within daily life. For the photographs in Congo, he took five trips over two years to document the life of a post-colonial nation. “I decided to use a 1954 tourist guide for the Congo – at that time still a Belgian colony. Visiting all kinds of colonial backgrounds – mines, factories, schools, monasteries, churches, prisons. In fact it’s more a project about Belgium itself. A small European country (80 times smaller) being arrogant enough to export their own surrealism to the heart of Africa.”

 

The photographs were made into a series of two books in 2009 and 2010,Congo (Belge) and Congo Belge en images. The first book consisted of his contemporary photographs (tour guide) and the second included a selection of remastered glass negatives of the birth of the colony (1890 – 1920). Each photograph implies a story or carries a message—all focus on the people in the situation, all cross the line between straightforward photojournalism and a richer, more artful documentary style. “I tend to engage in long-term projects. I prefer to stay in a country for a longish period in order to get a better feeling of what is going on there. I prefer complex images because they reflect the complexity of life itself. There is a conflict between the utilitarian aspect of certain images taken for a precise purpose and photographs expressing a more personal viewpoint. I am always somewhere in the middle. Can you really grasp a situation through a picture? Yes, perhaps. You try, even if you stay a stranger looking in from the outside. What you are aiming at is photographs showing situations that have repercussions on people’s lives. That is why I am a photographer.”

Photo report's insight:

Link info:
The portfolio is on Projects : 2009 Congo (Belge)

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La vida no vale nada | Photojournalist: Lianne Milton

La vida no vale nada | Photojournalist: Lianne Milton | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

There's a common phrase Guatemalans say about violence in their country: En Guatemala, la vida no vale nada. In Guatemala, life is worth nothing.

This work examines the social impact of daily, postwar violence. I began this project last November when I returned to cover the Presidential elections. Violence was at an all-time high and Guatemalans were ready for change.

Fifteen years after the end of its bloody and genocidal civil war, Guatemala elected its first peacetime military leader; a former army general who emerged from retirement shrouded with human rights abuses.

 

Guatemala is the only country in the western hemisphere that experienced genocide in the 20th century. During the country’s 36-year civil war, (1960-1996), about 200,000 people were killed and another 50,000  “disappeared” and buried in mass graves throughout the country. It left a brutal legacy of violence on the social fabric of this highly indigenous country.

As Guatemalans continue to recover from decades of political violence, the growth of cartel, gang and street violence increase. A hired assassin can earn about $20 per murder. Mexican drug cartels are new players in a complex mix of paramilitary and vigilante groups in the shadowlands between state and organized crime in Guatemala. While today there is no official war, Guatemalans live with 98% impunity, and a homicide rate of 40 murders per 100,000 inhabitants, some critics say Guatemala is on the verge of becoming a failed state.

 

I’ve met many Guatemalans, from taxi drivers to business owners who expressed a desperate hope for change in their country. They were exhausted by the daily violence, and blamed the former president for his passivity. Hotel owner Lorena Artola, said to me recently, “We live in constant fear, drive shitty cars with tinted windows, and get killed for the most simplest things, like a cell phone. We can’t buy anything nice because we become a target.

In January 2012, former military dictator from 1982-83, during the worst of wartime violence, Rios Montt, was ordered to stand trial on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity, a symbolic victory for victims of the war. With the help of the International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG), a UN-Guatemala initiative that pursues high profile criminal cases and provides new investigative tools, there was progress in the advancement of human rights in Guatemala for the first time since the 1996 Peace Accords.

 

For years I have heard about the violence in Guatemala ripping apart families, much like the civil war did. I was compelled to work on this project because so much media attention has been focused on Mexico. How were countries in Central America, like Guatemala, affected by Mexico’s balloon effect from fighting drug cartels? There is no one answer. For Guatemala, violence stems from the complexities of civil war and on-going drug trafficking, coupled with a corrupt government and weak social infrastructure. Guatemala is a country rich in indigenous culture, steeped in tradition and nourished by a beautiful resiliency. This project explores the impact on how families and communities live with daily violence, and the aftermath of civil war.

Photo report's insight:

Lianne Milton is an editorial and documentary photographer based Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and often works in SE Asia and Central America.

 

 

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Le tabou de la retouche photo en France | Photographe : Serge Bouvet

Le tabou de la retouche photo en France | Photographe : Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Il est des photos ratées qu’on ne regrette pas qu’elles le soient tant le sujet est banal et il est des photos captivantes dont on regrette qu’elles soient abîmées. Par conséquent, la restauration peut s’imposer comme un recours efficace. Dans le domaine de la photographie numérique, la restauration passe par la post-production : la  retouche. Le gros mot est lâché. En France, retoucher une photographie est devenue un tabou voire un sacrilège. En ce qui me concerne, sachant que la photo ne sera jamais garante de la transparence du réel, je considère ces controverses sacralisante un peu vaine. Explications…

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Teissier Marion's curator insight, April 1, 4:58 AM

J'avais un avis réservée sur la retouche des photos il y a encore quelques mois. Mais cela apporte un rendu différent au photo, quand la retouche est bien faite bien sur.

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Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.

Photo report's insight:

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 13, 2:09 AM

Police corruption in india

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Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez

Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The clock on the wall marked four in the morning. It was a cold and wet Saturday in July, but I was sitting in the warm offices of El Salvador’s Red Cross. Suddenly, the relative calm and silence in the emergency unit was interrupted when the phone rang. The loud noise made me jump. The phone operator said: “What is your name? If you don’t identify yourself, we can’t help you.”

 

I went to the operator and asked him what was happening. He said that there had been a report of a woman who had been beaten, raped several times and then left for dead in a ditch. He said that they would take her to hospital because of the severity of her injuries and I asked to go along.

 

When I got to where she had been found, I saw a woman dressed in a baby blue dress that was dirty all over, with a face disfigured by the blows she had received. She was disoriented and her gaze seemed lost in a void. She kept on repeating that her name was Claudia (...) - Ulises Rodriguez

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Le tabou de la retouche photo en France | Photographe : Serge Bouvet

Le tabou de la retouche photo en France | Photographe : Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"En France, retoucher une photographie est devenue un tabou voire un sacrilège. En ce qui me concerne, sachant que la photo ne sera jamais garante de la transparence du réel, je considère ces controverses sacralisante un peu vaine. Explications(...)"


"(...) Les chiens de garde de la photographie pure, de la photographie objective existait déjà. Parlons-en de ces pourfendeurs de la photographie dite objective. Une certaine caste de photographes a pour dogme que retoucher une photo nuit à l’objectivité. Allons bons ! Et que les photographes qui retravaillent les clichés sont considérés comme des escamoteurs du réel. Si j’en observe l’histoire de la photographie, force est de croire que la polémique sur le sujet n’a pas désenflé puisque le travail quotidien allait et va toujours à l’encontre de ce débat immuable. En effet, dès l’introduction de la photographie dans la presse, au XIXe siècle, les journalistes ont toujours travaillé l’image. L’intervention a posteriori sur le document photographique est attestée dès les débuts de la photographie.(...)


"(...)Je soupçonne ces chiens de garde de la photographie « sans retouche » de souffrir du complexe du bon photographe qui ne rate jamais sa photo. Combien de fois, n’ai-je pas lu dans certains magazines français cette expression  “photo sans retouche” comme d’un label de qualité indiscutable. Pour moi, cela  vise essentiellement à garantir un certain niveau de qualité technique, en signifiant une maîtrise absolu de l’outil pour éviter le recours à des expédients comme Photoshop ou Lightroom. Il laisse par ailleurs sous entendre l’existence d’un photographe parfait, d’un démiurge absolu de l’image reproduite. Allez dire ça à Steve Mc Curry ou Ami Vitale pour qui la post-production, la retouche sont essentielles.(...)" - Serge Bouvet

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Danielle Cadusseau's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:14 PM

Technique photographique

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The TB epidemic in Ukraine | Photojournalist: Maxim Dondyuk

The TB epidemic in Ukraine | Photojournalist: Maxim Dondyuk | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

My name is Maxim Dondyuk and I’m a 29 y.o. documentary photographer living in Ukraine. I used to be a photojournalist covering news events in Ukraine, but two years ago I quit and started in documentary photography.

In 1995, the World Health Organization declared the tuberculosis epidemic in Ukraine. Over the past 16 years the situation has greatly worsened. Each day TB takes lives of 30 people, annually - about 10 thousand.

 

In December 2010, I went to Donbass region in Ukraine. I was greatly influenced by what I saw on the first day. One of the first patients I had photographed was suffering from gastrointestinal tuberculosis. He was lying naked on a hospital bed and staring at the ceiling. A week later I was with him in the last hours of his life. He could not move or talk, his body was like a skeleton covered with skin. He clutched a cross to his chest and prayed. Afterwards I met his wife and she told me how he had walked around the house with a torn stomach and intestines dragging across the floor, because the ambulance had refused to transfer him to the hospital. They had to call for a taxi. After a while I realized that this happens all over the country and that the epidemic of tuberculosis has become one of the national problems.

 

A lot of prisons amnesty the convicts in serious health conditions so as not to spoil their mortality figures. Two-thirds of former prisoners are dissolved in the country without being kept under medical supervision. Hospitals are in a terrible state and all phthisiology keeps on doctors who are long overdue to retire. Patients with drug-resistant TB have to use public transport to receive medical supplies and food and those without money just die in their beds. In the midst of current political wars in Ukraine everybody is just indifferent to the problem of tuberculosis.

 

For me it is very important to communicate truthfully what I have witnessed. And for that I must experience the problem myself, because my goal is to convince the viewer and to convince others you must first convince yourself. I live in hospitals with other patients, sometimes I stay in patients’ homes. I realized recently that taking pictures is not enough; I began to use a dictaphone to record their stories and made videos for a future multimedia. Everyone I tell about is close to me. I’ve known each of them for several months, lived a part of my life with them and buried some of them.

I will plan to continue shooting project of the TB epidemic in other countries of the former Soviet Union. - Maxim Dondyuk

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