PHOTOGRAPHERS
Follow
Find tag "portrait"
43.6K views | +93 today
PHOTOGRAPHERS
News about photography
Curated by Photo report
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

India | Photographer: Jason Wallis

India | Photographer: Jason Wallis | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jason Wallis is an editorial and advertising photographer based in Birmingham, Alabama. He recently returned from a trip to Northern India to document, through portraits, the work ofNever Thirst, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing clean water to those who have none. Of the series, he says: “India is such a paradoxical place for me. It’s one of the dirtiest places I have ever been, with the most vibrant colors and people I have ever met. I met villagers that had never seen white men before. The Indian people are a curious sort, so we drew crowds every time we showed up in a village and pulled out our gear. I can only imagine what they were thinking seeing these ghosts of men pulling out their flashing lights!”

more...
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 4:44 PM

I was fascinated by looking at some of the pictures that this amazing photographer took. You can really get a sense of what the photographer was trying to capture and the sense of feel throughout the pictures. 

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L.

Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Beyond is a documentary by filmmaker Cale Glendening which follows my assistant Ryan and I as we complete our latest photo series in Varanasi, India- "Holy Men." Although not much technical information is discussed in this particular featurette, my goal is to inspire you and give you insight into what goes into one of my personal projects. Almost every major religion breeds ascetics; wandering monks who have renounced all earthly possessions, dedicating their lives to the pursuit of spiritual liberation.Their reality is dictated only by the mind, not material objects. Even death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion." - JOEY L.

more...
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 5:27 PM

The video/pictures are very cool and interesting to see. You get to see what the people go threw. Although its not very much an educational purpose to this, you get to see the work that this artist did. Job well done.

FreeStockImages's curator insight, December 1, 11:32 AM

Amazing shot!

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Few kilometers from the border of India, German photographer Karolin Klüppel discovered the tiny, isolated village of Mawlynnong where ‘girls rule the world’. Made up of only 92 dwellings in the East Khasi Hills, the town uniquely operates as a matrilinear society, each family’s lineage traced through the surname of the wife instead of the husband. The result is a culture where female descendants are most crucial to the continuing bloodline and the youngest daughter inherits all family property. Fascinated by this rare singularity, Klüppel spent 6 months with the Mawlynnong women to create Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls).

Along with the privilege of carrying the family name, girls are expected to take on many responsibilities at a very young age, often caring for 3 generations under one roof. As early as 8 years old, Mawlynnong females can run the entire household and tend to their younger siblings single handed. Despite their isolation from the modern world and a plethora of familial duties, the girls of Mawlynnong experience a life of freedom and reverence all their own.

more...
Monica Matteuzzi's curator insight, October 6, 7:23 AM

For "the project "Mädchenland" Küppel spent six months in the village of Mawlynnong where people of the Khasi form the majority of the population. The Khasi are a matrilineal society. Here, traditionally it is girls who are of particularly importance and who play an exposed role in the family.

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan

LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Mortality is an irrevocable fact of life, yet when inevitable reminders of it surface it can be earth shattering. When Hanoi-based photographer Maika Elan‘s father was in treatment for cancer, Elan was suddenly thrust into the role of adult during his treatment. In order to keep his spirits up during this process, Elan took her father to the same park he took her to as a child, photographing him and even playing with him as he used to with her. In her World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass project statement, Elan says, “I think it’s my turn to do something for my father, as he has done for me in the past. We both went back to the same park and played like old days. I hope these pictures I make will be a big motivation for him. I hope they let him see that he is not as sick as he feels. In my heart, he is always a happy person and full of optimism.” As of now, Elan’s father has recovered enough that he has been able to return to work. That he gets a kick out of seeing his daughter’s photos of him disseminating through the ether seems to indicate her ploy to brighten his spirits worked.

Photo report's insight:

Maika Elan (Nguyen Thanh Hai) was born in Vietnam, and lives and works in Hanoi. After taking a BA in sociology at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in 2006, Maika started to use the camera to document her daily and private life. She soon turned to professional photography, working for editorial clients and fashion firms in Vietnam. In 2010, she took up documentary photography.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters

Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dan Winters is an American photojournalist, illustrator, filmmaker and writer.

 

He was born in Ventura County, California on October 21, 1962. He first studied photography and the darkroom process starting in 1971 while a member of his local 4-H club. In 1979, while still a high school senior, he began working full time in the motion picture special effects industry in the area of miniature construction and design. He went on to study photography at Moorpark College, in California. After receiving an associates arts degree there, he entered the documentary studies program atLudwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany, focusing mainly on narrative photojournalism.

 

In 1986, he began his career in photography as a photojournalist in his home town in Ventura County, at the Thousand Oaks News Chronicle. After winning several local awards for his work, he moved to New York City, where magazine assignments came rapidly. In 1991, he moved to Los Angeles and married Kathryn Fouts, who became his photo rep and studio manager. In 1993, his son Dylan was born in Los Angeles. In 2000, while maintaining a home in LA, he moved to Austin, Texas. There he set up a studio outside Austin in a historic building built in 1903, that had originally served as a general store, gas station and post office for nearly 100 years before he arrived.

 

Known for the broad range of subject matter he is able to interpret, he is widely recognized for his iconic celebrity portraiture, his scientific photography, his photojournalistic stories and more recently his drawings and illustrations. He has created portraits of luminaries such as Bono, Neil Young, Barack Obama, Tupac Shakur, the Dalai Lama, Stephen Hawking, Leonardo DiCaprio, Helen Mirren, Johnny Depp, Kate Winslet, Angelina Jolie, Sandra Bullock, Brad Pitt, Steven Spielberg and Al Gore.

 

He has won over one hundred national and international awards from American Photography, Communication Arts, The Society of Publication Designers, Photo District News, The Art Directors Club of New York and Life, among others. In 1998, he was awarded the prestigious Alfred Eisenstadt Award for Magazine Photography. In 2003, he won a 1st place World Press Photo Award in the portrait category. In 2003, he was also honored by Kodak as a photo "Icon" in their biographical "Legends" series.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco

Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Oleg Oprisco is a brilliantly talented photographer from Lviv, Ukraine, who creates stunning surreal images of elegant women in fairy-tale or dream-like settings. There’s one significant difference, however, that sets him apart from other artists who create similar work – Oprisco shoots using old-school film photography.

 

The fact that he shoots with film means that everything you see in these photos had to be created that way – it couldn’t be done digitally. “I’ve found it ideal to do everything myself. I come up with a concept, create the clothing, choose the location and direct the hair and makeup,” Oprisco explained in an interview with Bored Panda. “Before shooting, I plan the overall color scheme. According to the chosen palette, I select clothes, props, location, etc, making sure that all of it plays within a single color range.” He uses Kiev 6C and Kiev 88 cameras with medium-format film and a variety of lenses.

 

It’s clear that Oprisco is deeply passionate about his work. “Each of my photos is a scene from real life. That is the perfect source of inspiration for me as there is so much beauty to it.” Oprisco offered some inspiring advice for aspiring young photographers mixed in with some tough love as well. “Drop your job and shoot … if you feel that’s what you want,” he said. “Freedom, happiness, money… all will come after you let go and just shoot.”

 

more...
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 13, 11:52 PM

Oleg Oprisco es un fotógrafo brillante talento de Lviv, Ucrania, que crea impresionantes imágenes surrealistas de las mujeres elegantes de cuento de hadas o ajustes de ensueño. Hay una diferencia significativa, sin embargo, que lo diferencia de otros artistas que crean un trabajo similar - Oprisco dispara usando la vieja escuela de fotografía de la película. 

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Mental illness | Photographer: Lisa Lindvay

Mental illness | Photographer: Lisa Lindvay | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

These photographs are from an ongoing series that depicts the lives of my father, sister, and two brothers over the past five years as they take on the burden of my mother’s deteriorating mental health.

This work represents an extended look at the physical and emotional currents within our home. The images are a visual representation of the internal dilemmas associated with this entropic state. The photographs expose how my mother’s illness influences the condition of the space and emotional well being of my family members. This is an exploration of how individual identity is shaped and altered within our familial relationship.- Lisa Lindvay 

"

Photo report's insight:

Chicago-based photographer Lisa Lindvay opens the door to her home in an intimate portrait of a family coping with mental illness. Though Lindvay’s mother is absent, the signs of her struggle are present in every frame, each image heavy with abandon and quiet exhaustion. Here we are privy to the deeply private tale of her father and sibling’s lives behind the closed and musty blinds, the grimy floors and junk food artifacts a constant reminder of what is broken and missing. The family maintains a stoic presence throughout the series, belaboring with an almost classical melancholy in the everyday tragedy that has befallen them. The crumbling home a metaphor for her mother’s deteriorating state of health, Lindvay’s ongoing work is a radically bare and powerful examination of familial survival when all feels lost.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

1503 | Fine art photographer: CHRISTIAN TAGLIAVINI

1503 | Fine art photographer: CHRISTIAN TAGLIAVINI | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With his already legendary series »1503« Christian Tagliavini invites the viewer to a time travel to the 16th century. His protagonists bear names such as Cecilia, Lucrezia or Bartolomeo, they are gracile, graceful or mighty and all of them express the pride of the Renaissance. In the style of the Florentine Agnolo di Cosimo, in art history better known as Bronzino, Tagliavini gives the patina of Mannerism to his modern sitters. The title of the series »1503« is also a reference to Bronzino’s year of birth.

 

The artist does not only stages the image space or places the light. The accurate spadework of each portrait is an inalienable foundation for the accomplished work that attracts the recipient. From the casting over the design of the dresses through to the makeup, Tagliavini is the indicatory player in every single operating procedure. The universal artist creates a piece of art that is the result of this creative process – the traces of them meet up in the final work and culminate in something sublime.

 

By doing so, the artist perfectly succeeds in the challenge of citing art history without simply copying it. Finally, with a productive period of more than 13 months the series »1503« has become an impressive testament of the visionary creative richness of the avant-gardist Christian Tagliavini. 

Photo report's insight:

Born in 1971, Christian Tagliavini grew up in Italy and Switzerland. He had studied graphic design and worked as an architect and graphic artist before he focused on photography art in 2000. Additional fine arts such as architecture, graphic design or drawing have influenced his art until today. His biographic background also shaped his understanding of art to invent and construct works. His works cannot only be seen as images, they are complex pieces of art, which have their roots in different materials. Tagliavini’s creative work is mostly mirrored in series that tell stories, offer multifaceted quotes or which are the result of an unusual contemporary concept. His works have been exhibited in numerous exhibitions and art fairs worldwide. Christian Tagliavini, who was honoured with the Hasselblad Masters Award in 2012, lives and works in Switzerland today.

more...
Rob Vonmeulen's curator insight, January 8, 8:08 AM

Back to 1500 .... 

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

La transfiguration du banal dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet

La transfiguration du banal dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dans le domaine du business, ne perdons pas de vue que la vente d’un magazine est surtout régie dans nos sociétés occidentales par un levier marketing singulier : l’idéal de beauté. Cela ne date pas d’hier. Je ne souscris pas totalement à cette analyse, mais force est de constater que dans le jeu de la séduction, l’artifice est roi. Dans le secteur du business, il coexiste deux cas d’écoles : l’une prône l’artifice dans la communication visuelle quand la seconde cultive la sobriété. A vous d’en estimer le potentiel selon la charte de la société pour laquelle vous travaillez.

 

"On est comme ça. Nous témoignons par nos aspirations naïves vers la majesté superlative des formes artificielles, d’une certaine répugnance à ce qui est trop réel.

Je considère les artifices comme l’indice d’une appétence pour l’idéal évoluant dans notre esprit au-dessus de tout ce que la vie naturelle y accumule de trop terre à terre, comme une déformation sublime de la nature.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet

Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nothing better reflects the strangeness of a people than the environment in which he lives. So I decided to import a part of India in Europe, framed in a bus shelter or ad showcase to create an open-air museum. Sometimes it coexists funny interaction between the two dimensions. These photos are a poetry of Rajasthan." - Serge Bouvet

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY

In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
After 150 years of broken promises, the Oglala Lakota people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota are nurturing their tribal customs, language, and beliefs. A rare, intimate portrait shows their resilience in the face of hardship. 

Almost every historical atrocity has a geographically symbolic core, a place whose name conjures up the trauma of a whole people: Auschwitz, Robben Island, Nanjing. For the Oglala Lakota of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that place is a site near Wounded Knee Creek, 16 miles northeast of the town of Pine Ridge. From a distance the hill is unremarkable, another picturesque tree-spotted mound in the creased prairie. But here at the mass grave of all those who were killed on a winter morning more than a century ago, it’s easy to believe that certain energies—acts of tremendous violence and of transcendent love—hang in the air forever and possess a forever half-life.

 

Alex White Plume, a 60-year-old Oglala Lakota activist, lives with his family and extended family on a 2,000-acre ranch near Wounded Knee Creek. White Plume’s land is lovely beyond any singing, rolling out from sage-covered knolls to creeks bruised with late summer lushness. From certain aspects, you can see the Badlands, all sun-bleached spires and scoured pinnacles. And looking another way, you can see the horizon-crowning darkness of the Black Hills of South Dakota.

 

One hot and humid day in early August, I drove out to interview White Plume in a screened outdoor kitchen he had just built for his wife. Hemp plants sprouted thickly all over their garden. “Go ahead and smoke as much as you like,” White Plume offered. “I always tell people that: Smoke as much as you want, but you won’t get very high.” The plants are remnants from a plantation of industrial hemp—low-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) Cannabis sativa—cultivated by the White Plume family in 2000.

Fuller text: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/08/pine-ridge/fuller-text ;
Photo report's insight:

Aaron Huey is a National Geographic photographer and a Contributing Editor for Harper's Magazine. He is based in Seattle, WA.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

“Gaia,The Birth Of An End” | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell

“Gaia,The Birth Of An End” | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Tonight it’s dark in the studio, and I’m curled up in my chair staring at this blank page, about to write the first Wonderland diary entry in 9 long months.. Outside its raining, and this morning brought the first frost I have noticed since last winter. Earlier, as I walked to work I stopped and watched a flutter of yellow leaves circle my boots, reminding me fondly of the cloak I made for ‘The Journey Home’ almost one year ago to the day. These fragments of seasons have become like old friends I find myself silently greeting, one by one as they return unannounced, blown by the autumn wind.


The landscape is changing in colour and I’m hoping for snow, as there is still one last picture I need to create before I can let the story complete. But for now, after months of work I am finally ready to let this last chapter unfold, of what has since become the last 4.5 years of my life.  I still can’t imagine the day I write the words ‘The End’ but it is slowly becoming a palpable reality, which leaves a bitter sweet emotion in my gut. The pictures I have created over the last few months have at times pushed me to my limit, and I know I have learnt so much about myself in the process.


I have had days when I have never felt to so happy to be alive, standing in the woods with my camera, so grateful for every precious moment ….. and others where my own crushing lack of self confidence has made me sick with worry, as to whether or not I have created something good enough. It is always the same with me …. all or nothing, the highest highs and lowest lows, but throughout it all I can say I have tried my hardest. I faced challenges I was genuinely scared of, but forced myself through as they were the only way to produce the ending I always dreamt of. So I just wanted to say how thankful I am to the people who have been on this journey with me and taken Wonderland into their hearts, both the followers of the project and the irreplaceable tiny team I work so closely with."- Kirsty Mitchell 

more...
Martin Lea's curator insight, November 25, 2013 6:52 AM

More digital imaging than photography but really creative and beautiful.........

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe

The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For The Shepherd’s Realm: Volume III, photographer Andrew Fladeboe captures New Zealand’s courageous working dogs, tracing the historical threads that connect them to the verdant farms and steep hills of the country’s South Island.

 

Fladeboe has dedicated the last few years of his career to chronicling the millennia-long bond fostered between man and dog. Canines, he explains, have been by our side for more than 30,000 years, ensuring not only our prosperity but also our survival. In New Zealand in particular, herding dogs have been a crucial part of the cultural landscape since border collies emigrated from Scotland during the 19th century, and until fifty years ago, the sheep industry was New Zealand’s leading enterprise.

 

The artist explains that although working dogs are rarely petted or allowed inside, they do share a close friendship with the farmers who have trained them. Herding dogs are most often border collies of huntaways, a breed native to New Zealand, and they are bred and raised to be deeply in tune with the farmers. They can comprehend seven whistled commands and often can anticipate the wishes of the shepherd with whom they work side-by-side.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte

AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

This is Habib Manzah Iddi’s first motorcycle. He is part of a growing new generation of youth that is aware of the surrounding world and strives towards their dreams. They are determined not to live like their parents did, but wish to assimilate to the modern world.

According to the UN site World’s Best News, every third African is now considered middle class, around 33% of the population having up to $20 dollars to spend a day. With the extreme poverty of the last few decades slowly dissipating, people in places like Ghana can afford more than just food for survival. Across the continent, Africans are spending more money on education, healthcare and entrepreneurial endeavors, creating a landscape of rapid cultural, economic and social change. Danish photographer Ulrik Tofte documents the young people in the middle of this transformative upheaval, their lives a constant balance of old traditions and new possibilities.

The Key Is Not To Blink presents a different vision of Africa than we are used to. Tofte focused on youth in Northern Ghana, determined to capture images contrasting the typical photos of war and starving children so familiar to us. The growing middle class has created a culture more focused on the individual – people now more free to have dreams, desires and personal goals. Torn between issues of religion, pop culture, familial expectations and consumerism, young Africans have an uncertain and limitless world in which to navigate their lives. Though progress can be slow, Ghana and other countries like it continue to move forward while trying to preserve some sense of their past.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

New York City-based photographer Mark Hartman spent most of March and April 2014 in India working on personal projects, including these images from his series “Bole Sol Nihang” portraits of Nihang Sikhs. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab Region in 1469 by the Guru Nanak. There are now 26 million Sikhs living around the world, making it the world’s fifth largest religion. Nihang Sikhs, also known as the “eternal army,” are the army of the 10th Guru of the Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind Singh.

 

The Nihangs and all Sikhs believe all people should have the right to practice any religion and follow any path they choose. Nihangs are known for their fearlessness, bravery and successful victories in battle, even when heavily outnumbered. According to Hartman, their way of life has not changed for more than 300 years, living a “nomadic, spiritual life” that is “unattached to the world.” Thanks to what he calls his “magic powers,” Hartman was granted access to this unique group of Sikhs while he was traveling in Amirtsar and Anandpursahib, in Northern India, Punjab.

 

“I have not seen anyone set up on-location portraits of the Nihang Sikhs,” Hartman writes about the work. “My curiosity and interest in their philosophy fueled my desire to learn more about them, and inspired me to create the work. My favorite photos of them were made well-over 100 years ago. I felt a necessity to make images of them in modern times. I have always loved the portrait work of August Sander and Edward Curtis. Their work is about the subject; nothing else. I choose to photograph these people in a similar, very straightforward manner, working within my vision. I isolated the subject, set up the scene and composition while interacting with the subject, and finally photographed the subject.”

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/05/26787#gallery-6

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"La photo est une trace." De mon auguste bouche, l'affirmation pourrait passer pour un truisme barbant. Le rappel d'une telle évidence est pourtant un fondamental dans la photographie. Dans le sujet que je vous propose, cette trace est celle de la rencontre. Cette dernière exprime une relation entre le photographe et son sujet. Je vous suggère donc de bien réfléchir à la pose à faire prendre que vous indiquerez à vos sympathiques sujets. Un manque d'exigence à la prise de vue risquerait de produire un portrait manquant de force affective.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

A new kind of beauty | Photographer: Mr Toledano

A new kind of beauty | Photographer: Mr Toledano | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For A New Kind Of Beauty, London-based photographer Phillip Toledano photographs individuals who have invested in numerous plastic surgeries. His sitters, having built their bodies in the image of some unknowable, personal ideal, are perhaps signifiers of a new dawn of physical expression. The subjects of the work, some of whom have gained national celebrity for their appearances, exude an intense eroticism, one that is alternately uncomfortable and exhilarating.

Toledano, inspired by the 16th century painter Hans Holbein, is drawn to the sculptural, highlighting the sensuous curves of the body in luscious reds, blacks, and creamy nudes.

 

Toledano’s subjects might at first appear as if carved from marble, cold or detached in their statuesque form, but the beauty of the work lies in questioning that impulse to judge; what, after all, defines a face as warm, emotive and human? Says the photographer, “In some ways I think that the subjects of [A New Kind of Beauty] are the vanguard of human evolution. Twenty years ago tattoos and piercing were considered fringe at best, outlandish at worse. And now they’re both quite mainstream. I think that in 40 or 50 years, when plastic surgery is cheap and prevalent, what it means to look human may be very different from what it means to look human today.”

 

Toledano views beauty as a sort of currency; if all can afford to surgically alter the exterior self, are we no longer reliant on our genetics, and do we then begin to have a more democratic society? Or do we simply move further away from our truest individual selves? One image of a young man, his head wrapped in cloth, much resembles Jack-Louis David’s painting of French Revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat. Are these individuals, then, revolutionaries, paving the way for “a new kind of beauty?” Take a look.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Selfportrait | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Selfportrait | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On dit que la photographie et plus récemment le téléphone portable ont favorisé le boom de l’autoportrait. Sans aucun doute. Ce que moi je peux vous affirmer, c’est que l’autoportrait peut-être une agréable récréation à laquelle j’aimerai vous convier. 

Je me plais dans une photo quand j’en suis le photographe.  J’aime me photographier en très gros plan, en plan moyen, couché, assis, debout. Que l’on ne se méprenne pas sur mes intentions. Je vous vois venir avec vos gros sabots pour me sermonner sur l’égocentrisme. On se trompe sur l’autoportrait. Il se trouve à mille lieux de l’exercice narcissique. D’aucuns, bourrés de poncifs comme une dinde de Noël l’est de marrons, envisageraient l’approche de l’autoportrait comme l’avatar du divan freudien. Je ne l’ai pas assez gros sur la patate pour m’éplucher le nombril à ce point.  Faut se détendre. L’autoportrait, c’est aussi un jeu. Un moyen sympa pour s’affranchir de l’authenticité. Pour s’évader de soi. Comment ?

 

Depuis que je suis môme, j’ai toujours eu tendance à faire des grimaces devant mon miroir. Quelque part, je raillais mon image. C’est ainsi que j’aborde la pratique de l’autoportrait : comme une déconstruction ludique de soi. Un pur jeu visuel qui pousse la représentation de soi-même jusqu’à l’ironie.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

SINGH | Photographers: Amit and Naroop

SINGH | Photographers: Amit and Naroop | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Amit and Naroop are London-based photographers specialising in music and advertising, but their latest series Singh is focused on a portraits of a very different kind. Taking the most powerful symbols of the Sikh faith, the pair have photographed a group of British Sikh men from all walks of life, and focusing on the traditional turban and beard, celebrated them in all of their diverse fashions.

They explain: “Many religions determine the way their followers look, but none have such a dramatic and definite ‘look’ as Sikhism. And yet, with 30 million Sikhs in the world, there are almost as many ways to wear the turban and beard as there are Sikhs…The men who feature in this project are businessmen, boxers, IT professionals, doctors, fashion stylists, temple volunteers, magicians and a host of other occupations all adapting and interpreting the Sikh traditions in their own way.”

Photographed with all of Amit and Naroop’s characteristic bright colours, glamour and polished finish, the series is an admiring portrait of the changing face of tradition in the UK. Lovely!

more...
Paula Silva's comment, March 3, 11:57 PM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Le tabou de la retouche photo en France | Photographe : Serge Bouvet

Le tabou de la retouche photo en France | Photographe : Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Il est des photos ratées qu’on ne regrette pas qu’elles le soient tant le sujet est banal et il est des photos captivantes dont on regrette qu’elles soient abîmées. Par conséquent, la restauration peut s’imposer comme un recours efficace. Dans le domaine de la photographie numérique, la restauration passe par la post-production : la  retouche. Le gros mot est lâché. En France, retoucher une photographie est devenue un tabou voire un sacrilège. En ce qui me concerne, sachant que la photo ne sera jamais garante de la transparence du réel, je considère ces controverses sacralisante un peu vaine. Explications…

more...
Teissier Marion's curator insight, April 1, 7:58 AM

J'avais un avis réservée sur la retouche des photos il y a encore quelques mois. Mais cela apporte un rendu différent au photo, quand la retouche est bien faite bien sur.

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com

Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Vidéo about Steve McCurry. Photographer Steve McCurry is known for his dramatic pictures, but the most famous shot he’s ever taken, a striking image of an Afghan girl, almost never got seen.

more...
Lighted Path's curator insight, December 13, 2013 9:48 PM

The story behind the image of the iconic Afghan girl and the photographer who took the shot.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, December 15, 2013 12:31 PM

Historias detrás de las fotografías en un libro del escritor Steve McCurry como por ejemplo la tan conocida de la chica Afgana de ojos claros.

Michel Prisca's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:46 PM

do I remember this Picture from the national geograpic Magazine??

 

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Façonner la lumière avec des filtres de couleur | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet

Façonner la lumière avec des filtres de couleur | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Un petit retour d’expérience

Ah que l’automne parisien est… terne ! Il est 13h00 ou 18h00, on ne sait plus. Quand on a un ciel de suie pareil en début d’après-midi, notre horloge biologique part en sucette. Alors, quand la voûte céleste est si plombée, pommelée, ou d’ardoise, que faire ? Eh bien, à défaut de prendre un ticket pour le soleil de la côte d’azur avec votre sujet, on s’adapte. On sort les flashs et les boîtes à lumière4 et on tente de faire au mieux.


Pour la photographie, j’utilise deux types d’ampoules : à spirale 5000K BIG ou halogène.  Remontons dans le temps. Par le passé, j’avais acheté des boîtes à lumière qui utilisaient des lampes halogène dit « studio-projection »  de la marque OSRAM, 1000Watts, une température de couleur (T°=3400 K)  assez proche de celle du Tungstène (T°=3200 K).  Au début, malgré ma balance des blancs, mes photos étaient toutes orangées et j’en était fort désappointé. C’est dans le domaine de la vidéo que j’ai compris l’origine de cette anomalie5. J’ai appris que lorsque la température de couleur diffère pour deux sources d’éclairage ou entre une source d’éclairage et le médium utilisé pour enregistrer les images.  Il fallait le savoir.


L’éclairage tungstène affiche une température de couleur inférieur à celle de la lumière du jour. La lampe produit une dominante orangée que je dois alors compenser en y plaçant un filtre bleu devant la source d’éclairage. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Les Visages des Puces | Photographer: Andrew Kovalev

Les Visages des Puces | Photographer: Andrew Kovalev | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen, located in the suburbs of Paris, is the biggest and one of the oldest flea markets in the world. It is said, that the expression “flea market” itself originates from here. It is a conglomerate of 14 smaller markets, each with its own features and speciality. It is a part of the cultural and historical heritage of France and a place of great touristic interest. Most importantly, it is a sophisticated social organism, a vast community of people who are passionate about their very special craft.

 

The goal of this project is to document the look and the spirit of the place in showing its face and soul. To show incredible diversity of its parts, which are merging together in one entity, while remaining the separate worlds.

 

This series portrays the people of The Market. Those, who live and work there, who actually create, preserve and change the place throughout its years and decades.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Translations | Photographer: Sofie Knijff

Translations | Photographer: Sofie Knijff | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Over the past years, Sofie Knijff has travelled across South Africa, India, Mali, Brazil, Iceland and Greenland to portray children and their fantasy worlds & dreams. Her aim was to isolate them from their surroundings, and daily lives, and focus their attention to reveal their own “dream character”. By using the same backdrop, she created a stage on which the dreams could come to life. The challenge was to build a subtle and yet sustained level concentration to capture the moment of transformation. At the same time, she took images of the empty spaces in which the same children live; allowing to create a set of images where the inside and outside mirror and influence one another. The impact of time underpins this project." - Sophie Knijff 

Photo report's insight:

Belgian-born photographer Sofie Knijff has spent the last three years traveling the world making portraits of children and asking them one question: what do you want to be when you grow up? With limitless imagination the children answer, dressing up as their future selves in a series she calls Translations. By using similar backdrops for each child, Knijff strips them of their current surroundings in order to focus more intimately on their “dream characters.”

more...
No comment yet.