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Color or not color ? Steve McCurry répond | Serge Bouvet, photographe

Color or not color ? Steve McCurry répond | Serge Bouvet, photographe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Sur la couleur et noir et blanc, chacun à son avis sur la question. Steve McCurry que j’ai rencontré à trois reprises à Paris, m’en a touché deux mots. A juste titre, pour accompagner le sujet en beauté, je vous propose de télécharger 4 préréglages Kodachrome offerts !® que j’ai conçus pour mes travaux de photographie en noir et blanc. 


Dans le monde de la photographie, le nom de Steve McCurry est synonyme de regard . Ses nombreux portraits saisissants font de lui l’un des meilleurs portraitistes au monde. Une référence historique incontournable pour qui veut s’intéresser à l’histoire de la photographie. A mes yeux, au même titre que Raghubir Singh et de William Eggleston, Steve McCurry a donné ces lettres de noblesse à la photographie couleur.


Le 13 décembre 2015, lors des Master Class qui avaient eu lieu à Paris, Steve McCurry m’a appris qu’il avait un point commun avec Raghubir Singh : Cartier Bresson. Chacun ont en effet présenté humblement leurs photos au maître français. A Steve McCurry, il lui conseille la voie noble du noir et blanc. L’élève s’émancipera du conseil de son mentor. A Raghubir Singh qui avait pris le taureau par les cornes en venant directement dans son appartement proche du Louvre pour lui remettre son ouvrage en couleur, il n’émet pas même une critique à son endroit. Cartier Bresson feuilletera à peine son livre. Dédain blessant pour Raghubir Singh. Le maître avait le regard soupçonneux et l’avis d’un inquisiteur à l’égard de la couleur. On ne touche pas au noir et blanc ! (...)

 

 

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Afghanistan | Photojournalist: Altaf Qadri

Afghanistan | Photojournalist: Altaf Qadri | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Altaf Qadri is a Kashmiri-Indian photojournalist with Associated Press.He has received several awards for is photographic work. The New York Times described his work as having a "sophisticated eye and highly effective technique."

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He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page

He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
He Led the CIA to bin Laden—and Unwittingly Fueled a Vaccine Backlash. Pakistani doctor's role in health campaign sparked local suspicions that efforts to fight polio were part of a Western plot.
Photo report's insight:

PESHAWAR, Pakistan—In his native Pakistan, Dr. Shakil Afridi is considered a traitor by many people for helping the Central Intelligence Agency track down and kill Osama bin Laden. In the United States, he is hailed as a hero.

 

In global health circles, his story is a cautionary tale about the consequences that can spiral out of control when health professionals get too close to intelligence operations.

More than three years after U.S. Navy SEALs raided bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, it remains unclear whether Afridi knew he was working for the CIA when he led a hepatitis B vaccination campaign that helped U.S. agents learn where bin Laden was hiding.

Afridi's wife and his current lawyer, Qamar Nadeem Afridi, who is the doctor's cousin, say that he didn't know of the CIA connection, and U.S. intelligence specialists say that even if he did know, Afridi almost certainly had no idea that the man whose location he helped to identify was the world's most wanted terrorist.

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Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova

Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

The documentary was held in Norilsk between February 2012 and February 2013.
The documentary was supported by the Lagardère foundation grant for photography.

« Days of Night – Nights of Day » is about the daily life of the inhabitants of Norilsk, a mining city northernmost of the polar circle with a population of more than 170 000.  The city, its mines and metallurgical factories were constructed by prisoners of the Gulag.  With 60% of the present population involved in the industrial process, this documentary aims to investigate human adaptation to extreme climate, ecological disaster and isolation.
Norilsk is the 7th most polluted city in the world.  The average temperature is -10C, reaching lows of -55C in winter, when for two months the city is plunged into polar night.
The living conditions of the people of Norilsk are unique, making their plight incomparable. - Elena Chernyshova

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Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov

Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Chittagong is one of the biggest ship breaking yards in the world. It is graveyard where ships are taken from all around the world for their last voyage, to be taken apart. 


Know for unsafe work practices and environmental pollution due to the demolition and ship breaking processes, Chittagong presents one of the biggest industry and job opportunities for many Bangladeshis.


Some 30, 000 workers are engaged in this scrapping in Bangladesh's Sitakunda coast, which houses the world's second largest ship-breaking industry after China. At least 250,000 people in the country live off the industry directly and indirectly, according to experts.


The industry is a critical contributor to the low-income country's economy, and Bangladesh relies on ship breaking for 80% of its steel needs. But along with the recyclable materials comes a lot of toxic junk and hazardous material such as asbestos.


Often unaware of the risks they face on a daily basis by carrying heavy loads, directly touching materials that are known to cause cancer (asbestos), the workers rarely take these risks into consideration. "I don't see any danger" said a 17 year old worker.


Living in a 3rd world country, taking care of a family, the priorities of workers in the yards of Chittagong have a different order. To be without a job, letting their families go hungry, represents a bigger treat to these men then working in an environment that can eventually lead to health issues or early death. 


Copyright Jana Asenbrennerova 2010 

Collaboration on access and text with Syed Zain Al-Mahmood

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Real Toy Story | Photographer: Michael Wolf

Real Toy Story  | Photographer: Michael Wolf | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Covering gallery walls with over 20,000 castaway toys, German photographer Michael Wolf thrusts visitors into the heart of consumerism with his series Real Toy Story. Though Chinese culture has taken the world stage in recent years, Wolf has long called the city of Hong Kong his home, documenting its many multifaceted characteristics and quirks. Real Toy Story dissects China’s production factories with an acute and striking eye, capturing each and every aspect of constructing children’s toys which are shipped and sold to millions across the globe. Here we are able to peek inside the world’s largest inexpensive and mass-produced plastic toy market and meet some of the faces behind the large metal doors.

 

Ever examining the cacophony of populace and urban chaos, Wolf’s installation further highlights the volume of products fabricated and sold daily. His hunt for toys began in Californian flea markets while on vacation in the United States. Only collecting toys ‘Made in China,’ Wolf returned to Hong Kong with thousands of forsaken, used objects. By nestling each factory worker portrait into the jumble of dirty, discarded toys, Real Toy Storyexposes the overwhelming reality of worldwide manufacturing and consumption.

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Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.

Photo report's insight:

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 13, 2014 5:09 AM

Police corruption in india

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Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez

Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The clock on the wall marked four in the morning. It was a cold and wet Saturday in July, but I was sitting in the warm offices of El Salvador’s Red Cross. Suddenly, the relative calm and silence in the emergency unit was interrupted when the phone rang. The loud noise made me jump. The phone operator said: “What is your name? If you don’t identify yourself, we can’t help you.”

 

I went to the operator and asked him what was happening. He said that there had been a report of a woman who had been beaten, raped several times and then left for dead in a ditch. He said that they would take her to hospital because of the severity of her injuries and I asked to go along.

 

When I got to where she had been found, I saw a woman dressed in a baby blue dress that was dirty all over, with a face disfigured by the blows she had received. She was disoriented and her gaze seemed lost in a void. She kept on repeating that her name was Claudia (...) - Ulises Rodriguez

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LETTER FROM AFGHANISTAN | Photojournalist: AARON HUEY

LETTER FROM AFGHANISTAN | Photojournalist: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"In the main square in Tirin Kot, the capital of Uruzgan Province, in central Afghanistan, a large billboard shows a human skeleton being hanged. The rope is not a normal gallows rope but the stem of an opium poppy. Aside from this jarring image, Tirin Kot is a bucolic-seeming place, a market town of flat-topped adobe houses and little shops on a low bluff on the eastern shore of the Tirinrud River, in a long valley bounded by open desert and jagged, treeless mountains.

 

About ten thousand people live in the town. The men are bearded and wear traditional robes and tunics and cover their heads with turbans or sequinned skullcaps. There are virtually no women in sight, and when they do appear they wear all-concealing burkas. A few paved streets join at a traffic circle in the center of town, but within a few blocks they peter out to dirt tracks.

 

Almost everything around Tirin Kot is some shade of brown. The river is a khaki-colored wash of silt and snowmelt that flows out of the mountain range to the north, past mud-walled family compounds. On either side of the river, however, running down the valley, there is a narrow strip of wheat fields and poppy fields, and for several weeks in the spring the poppies bloom: lovely, open-petalled white, pink, red, and magenta blossoms, the darker colors indicating the ones with the most opium."


Full text of article: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/07/09/070709fa_fact_anderson

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India stray dogs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

India stray dogs | Photographer:  Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

English:
"No country has as many stray dogs as India, and no country suffers as much from them. Free-roaming dogs number in the tens of millions and bite millions of people annually, including vast numbers of children. An estimated 20,000 people die every year from rabies infections — more than a third of the global rabies toll."

 - Serge BouvetFrançais: 
"Chaque année, 30.000 personnes meurent chaque année de la rage en Inde (70% des décès dans le monde) à cause de la morsure de chiens parias. Il est estimé qu’en Inde, une personne meurt de la rage à tous les 30 minutes. Environ 70% des victimes sont des enfants de moins de 15 ans."- Serge Bouvet

 

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:34 PM

So sad to see and hear how many stray dogs there are. I was very surprised when I read that India has more stray dogs than most. I would have thought differently, but even with the number of stray dogs I would definitely want to be cautious about knowing the boundaries in abusing/wanting to stop rabies from spreading. Although no one can really stop dogs from breeding and having more puppies, it would be important to maybe start a free vet clinic for the dogs that are in need. I mean by looking at the photo right there, its very sad to see what is going on. Although, I know that it is a struggle already for people in India to feed there families, imagine how the animals are trying to feed for there own. So sad. 

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Witness to a Massacre in a Nairobi Mall | Photojournalist: Tyler Hicks

Witness to a Massacre in a Nairobi Mall | Photojournalist: Tyler Hicks | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Tyler Hicks, a Times photographer, was nearby when gunmen opened fire on an upscale Kenyan mall.
Photo report's insight:

" I was at a framing shop in an adjacent mall picking up some photographs that had been given to me as gifts by photojournalists who attended my wedding. I was very close. I didn’t have all of my equipment, just had a small camera that I always have with me in case something happens.

I ran over to the mall and I was able to photograph until my wife [Nichole Sobecki], who is also a photojournalist and was at our house, was able to collect my Kevlar helmet and professional cameras before she came to cover the news herself.

Tyler Hicks/The New York TimesPolice and soldiers swept through the mall to pursue the assailants and to help civilians escape to safety.

When I left the framing shop, I could see right away that there was something serious going on, because there were lots of people running away from the mall. I ran over there and within minutes I could see people who had been shot in the leg or stomach from what appeared to be small arms fire being helped by other civilians. This went on for about 30 minutes.

The mall is Nairobi’s most high-end shopping center, completely up to Western standards, with movie theaters, nice cafes, supermarkets and a casino. Pretty much anything you need. I’ve been there, so I knew the layout inside.

From the beginning I wanted to get with some security forces inside the mall.

Tyler Hicks/The New York TimesGlass was shattered inside the mall.

We managed to find an entrance where people who were hiding inside the mall were coming out. We ran into that service entrance and we hooked up with some police who let us stay with them as they did security sweeps clearing different stores — very much like what you see when the military enters a village. Shop to shop and aisle to aisle, looking for the shooters who were still inside." - Tyler Hicks

 
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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, September 24, 2013 9:55 AM

Photos from Nairobi Mall. Not easy to watch, but the photos are good.

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Healthcare in Mississipi: Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario

Healthcare in Mississipi: Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nowhere is the American health care system more broken and desperate than rural Mississippi. Which is why an approach born in a broken and desperate place — Iran — may offer the best chance of saving lives. Photographer Lynsey Addario visited the impoverished state of Mississippi to explore this new approach to health care and hear some of the stories of those suffering from health problems." - Lynsey Addario

Photo report's insight:

Photographer Lynsey Addario visited the impoverished state of Mississippi to explore this new approach to health care and hear some of the stories of those suffering from health problems.

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Life for Rent | Photojournalist: Gmb Akash

Life for Rent | Photojournalist: Gmb Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Night is the meaning of life here. Don’t dare to feel I am talking about moonlit night. It’s about a place where fluorescent bulbs hesitate to light up the great darkness.  You have to go step by s...
Photo report's insight:

'Fighting over getting men at night does not change relationship between themselves on the day. An unknown bonding for each other has tied them up and takes care of them in dear need. That’s why, when a girl out of frustration cut her full hand with blade just to torture herself, her roommate wipe it off and put medicine on it. A six feet by six feet room is world for 3-4 girls, so when customer leave they decorate the bed with flowery bed sheet or place artificial flower for adding beauty of it. Knowing a home never will come in their life still they care for their small room as like their house' - GMB Akash 

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Photographer of the Year 2015 | Photojournalist: Jonas Gratzer

Photographer of the Year 2015 | Photojournalist: Jonas Gratzer | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Originally from Stockholm, Gratzer has been living in Bangkok with his wife and son since 2009. He has travelled throughout south-east Asia and the Indian subcontinent, focusing on rights issues such as child labour, human trafficking and women's rights, as well as environmental concerns. He has recently become a Getty Images contributor.

He said: "With my pictures I try to make people aware of what the daily struggle faced by millions of people across the continent. There are so many sides of Asia that are not pleasant. My major concern for the region is that corporations are eating up Asia and spreading like cancer. Many leaders in powerful positions turn a blind eye to what's happening in this part of the world. There is a sort of philosophy of 'money first and what happens next is not our concern.'"

Photo report's insight:

More photos of Jonas Gratzer at: http://www.jonasgratzer.com/

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Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Usually, in India, the Muslim segregated areas are seen as ghettos. However, these should be seen as cultural pockets, where group solidarity is strong. Turkman Gate is the old city around which the New Delhi city has come up. It would be wrong to brand whole of Turkman Gate as a ghetto, as it houses various wholesale markets and different communities as well. Ghettos are usually formed by new migrants to the city to hold on to their culture in an alien environment. People have been living here since centuries; they are the real residents of Delhi city and still follow age-old ‘Delhi culture." Serge Bouvet

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BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson

BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The wigmen of the Huli people aren’t like Western toupee manufacturers. They are wizards who only work with people who have fine heads of hair. What a traditional wigman does is use ancient magic to make hair grow faster than normal so it can be cut off and turned into a wig. Evidently, magic – like hair restorer – doesn’t work if the hair is long gone." - Jimmy Nelson

Photo report's insight:

Jimmy Nelson is a British photojournalist and photographer known for his portraits of tribal and indigenous peoples. 

 

In 2009 Nelson started to work on his biggest project to-date, Before they Pass Away. He travelled for 3 years and photographed more than 35 indigenous tribes around the world in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, and the South Pacific, using a 50-year-old 4x5in camera.[5] Nelson said that the project was "inspired by Edward Sheriff Curtis and his great photographs of Native Americans". The tribes that Nelson photographed include the Huli and Kalam tribes of New Guinea, the Tsaatan of Mongolia and the Mursi people of the Omo River valley in southern Ethiopia. Jimmy borrowed the funds from a Dutch billionaire, Marcel Boekhoorn.

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Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"For the past three decades as I traveled the world on assignment I
have witnessed children working in fields, factories, ditches, tunnels, mines, and ship-breaking yards. The scope of the problem is vast. Hundreds of millions of children spend their  childhood working and do not have an opportunity to play, go to school, or live in a healthy environment." - Steve McCurry

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

agregar su visión ...

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LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014

LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
LIVING UNNOTICED13 February 2013

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has no law that makes homosexuality illegal in the country, but there is no societal acceptance for it, which makes the idea of equal treatment under the law a fantasy. Gay people there often choose to remain hidden to protect themselves from physical danger and social stigmatization. At this point, there is almost no legal support for the gay community outside the occasional gesture from international sources and NGOs.

 

Rainbow Sunrise was founded in 2011 by Joseph Saidi, 26, to support the gay community in the city of Bukavu in the eastern DRC. Progress is slow due to a lack of funds, but the organization plays a critical role for local gay men and women, providing free HIV testing, condoms, sexual education, and perhaps most importantly, a safe place to share their personal struggles with others, without having to feel ashamed, rejected, or judged.

 

Saidi was attacked and jailed for several days in May 2013: “When I was in prison, I spent two days without food or drink. I was tortured, and I was raped by three inmates. I suffered from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. I was discriminated against based on my sexual orientation. I was beaten by inmates. I thought I was going to die because since my birth I've never been subjected to such treatment.”

 

Photo report's insight:
TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
SHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 320F-STOP: 2.0FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mm  
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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:45 AM

agregar su visión ...

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Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com

Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Vidéo about Steve McCurry. Photographer Steve McCurry is known for his dramatic pictures, but the most famous shot he’s ever taken, a striking image of an Afghan girl, almost never got seen.

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Lighted Path's curator insight, December 13, 2013 9:48 PM

The story behind the image of the iconic Afghan girl and the photographer who took the shot.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, December 15, 2013 12:31 PM

Historias detrás de las fotografías en un libro del escritor Steve McCurry como por ejemplo la tan conocida de la chica Afgana de ojos claros.

Michel Prisca's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:46 PM

do I remember this Picture from the national geograpic Magazine??

 

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Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta

Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I went to Jakarta’s business district to find photos of middle-class workers returning to their homes. When I had finished, I realized that I had something different to shoot for the next day. I searched Google maps to find the location of the collapsed bridge but I couldn’t find the exact location. There was a blank map with only the name of the village, Sanghiang Tanjung. Surprisingly, it said the village was just 130 kms (80 miles) away from our Jakarta office – a travel time of about two hours. My estimation was it would take 4 hours.

 

3am Thursday morning, my friend and driver Soewarno and I headed to the village. We reached by 6am. But the difficulty was this village was just a blank area on the map. Also, we had to find the right direction that the students would take, so that I could take a pictures from the front, not from the back. We found many roads in the village but no one knew where the bridge was. With the help of my friends, we were able to get the name of the head of the village, Epi Sopian, who accompanied us to the location. Edi said the bridge collapsed during Saturday’s big flood when wood and bamboo hit the suspension bridge’s pillar.

 

I arrived at the location as the students were crossing. They were already in the middle of the bridge. Oh no, these could not be the children who wanted to go to school, I thought! It was more like an acrobatic show the collapsed bridge as an apparatus and without any safety device at all. They walked slowly, sometimes screaming as their shoes slipped. Suddenly the rain came. A last group of students, Sofiah and her friend, were on the bridge. Happily, all the students crossed safely. I took pictures for no more than five minutes. (...)

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Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez

Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Violence and death are always present and tangible in Guatemala. The population seems to accept it as normal, even more so when women are the victims. In many cases, society simply ignores it, sits in silence or turns a blind eye.

 

Many men treat women as if they have no rights, thinking it unusual that someone should be punished or fined for beating, raping or killing them.

In Guatemala, violence against women generally starts behind the walls of their own homes. The aggressors in most cases are the men closest to them: fathers, brothers, cousins and partners.

 

There are now laws to protect women but there is little education, information or willingness to report crimes. The male perpetrators themselves often don’t seem to understand why they are being arrested. Prosecutors told me that they often hear from men accused of such crimes: “Why am I being arrested? I only hit my wife.” - Jorge Dan Lopez 



Photo report's insight:

"I was born in Guerrero State, in southern Mexico, a depressed region with large indigenous population. I began to take photos when I moved to Mexico City in the year 2000. After several courses in the capital I traveled to Italy in 2002 to live and photograph for diverse media until 2006. That year, one of great political and social change in Mexico, I returned to work for a financial newspaper and began with Reuters in 2008. I've been in Guatemala for Reuters since June of 2011." - Jorge Dan Lopez

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Only Unity - | Photographer: Matt Lutton

Only Unity -  | Photographer: Matt Lutton | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Only Unity”: Serbia In The Aftermath of Yugoslavia has emerged from five years of living and working in the Balkans; it is my personal response to the confounding atmosphere of the region. My project presents a psychological portrait of Serbs from across the Balkans as they confront a radically changed landscape within physically contracting borders. Serbia is emerging from the hangover of the 1990s, where atrocities were carried out in their name just across newborn borders, and constructive reflection about the consequences of those years is over due.

 

I am photographing details of society that both reflect and undermine the popular Serbian creation myths. Many issues are rooted in the complicated phrase “Only Unity Saves the Serbs” which was popular in the narrative of mass political manipulation during the disintegration of Yugoslavia and the wars that took place in its vacuum. Serbia is still recovering from the post- traumatic stress of those years, leading to a national confusion about their identity and a productive path forward.

I have focused on diverse subjects within the Serbian landscape which are far removed from any reality espoused by politicians. Young men and women are being raised in a divided, uncertain atmosphere and I hope to capture that essence so that we can further consider the implications of a Balkan region that is led by this generation. It is impossible to analyze or understand any event in this region without first considering its historical roots. I am interested in exploring and understanding the parts of today’s Balkan society that the next generation will read about in their history textbooks. What is happening now in the streets and in political negotiations will have profound impact on regional stability in the future.

 

There are many elements that contribute to a hostile and sometimes desperate atmosphere in Serbia today. But there too are moments that show healing and a glimpse at a different future than many have seen for themselves in the last decade. The growing pains of this developing democracy must continue to be carefully documented and explored, as the battles of the 1990s have yet to be finally played out. I’ve experienced alarming apathy and lack of compassion from many youth across the Balkans, and I hope to confront them directly with a different picture of the countries and history they will inherit. I hope my pictures will help bridge local borders, real and imagined. - Matt Lutton

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Bibi Aisha | Photographer: Jodi Bieber

Bibi Aisha | Photographer: Jodi Bieber | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Bibi Aisha (Pashto: بی بی عایشه‎; Bibi is a term of respect meaning "Lady"; born Aisha Mohammadzai, legal name Aesha Mohammadzai) is an Afghan woman whose mutilated face appeared on the cover of Time magazine in summer 2010. Her story first appeared in the Daily Beast in December 2009, which prompted doctors to write in offering to help her. The Grossman Burn Foundation in California pledged to perform reconstructive surgery on her and began organizing for her visa in the early spring of 2010. Diane Sawyer of ABC News also covered her ordeal in March 2010.

 

In a practice known as baad, Aisha's father promised her to a Taliban fighter when she was 12 years old as compensation for a killing that a member of her family had committed. She was married at 14 and subjected to constant abuse. At 18, she fled the abuse but was caught by police, jailed, and returned to her family. Her father returned her to her in-laws. To take revenge on her escape, her father-in-law, husband, and three other family members took Aisha into the mountains, cut off her nose and her ears, and left her to die. Bibi was later rescued by aid workers and the U.S. military. Some sources disputed the role of any members of the Taliban in her mutilation at the time it happened.

Aisha was featured on an August 2010 cover of Time magazine and in a corresponding article, "Afghan Women and the Return of the Taliban."

The cover image generated enormous controversy.

 

 The image and the accompanying cover title, "What Happens if We Leave Afghanistan," fueled debate about the merits of the Afghan War.

The photo was taken by the South African photographer Jodi Bieber and was awarded the World Press Photo Award for 2010. The image of Aisha is sometimes compared to the 'Afghan Girl' photograph of Sharbat Gula taken by Steve McCurry.

Shortly after Time's cover ran, Aisha was flown to the United States to receive free reconstructive surgery.

 

In May 2012 CNN.com ran an article about Aisha's activity. Since coming to the United States in August 2010, surgeons concluded she is mentally incompetent to handle the patient responsibilities in the surgical recovery regimen. Her psychologist, Shiphra Bakhchi, diagnosed her with borderline personality disorder, which may have been innately pre-existing throughout her life. She was taken in by the Women for Afghan Women shelter in Queens, New York and has subsequently moved to a family situation in Maryland.

 

The May 2012 CNN article by Jessica Ravitz explored the challenges faced by Aisha during her integration into a globalized world. "[S]he's been passed around by well-meaning strangers, showcased like a star and shielded like a fragile child," Ravitz reports. Its focus on Aisha as an autonomous person, rather than a poster child, serves as a portrait of the difficulties faced by trauma survivors and those that assist them.

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Monsoon | Photojournalism: Steve McCurry

Monsoon | Photojournalism: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I was eleven years old when I saw a photo essay on the monsoon in India in Life Magazine by Brian Brake, the New Zealand-born Magnum photographer.

His work established his reputation as a master color photoessayist. Twenty years later, I proposed a story to National Geographic to photograph the monsoon. The next year I joined Magnum Photos.

People have often asked me what it was like spending almost a year photographing the monsoon. I spent several months following the monsoon which affects half the people on the planet.

Weather is often my best ally as I try to capture the perfect mood for my pictures, but photographing the monsoon was an experience that taught me a lot about patience and humility.

 

Photographing in heavy rain is difficult because you have to constantly wipe the rain drops from the camera lens. That takes about a third of the time. Monsoon rain is accompanied by winds that try to wrestle away the umbrella that is wedged between my head and shoulders.

I spent four days, in a flooded city in Gujarat, India, wading around the streets in waist-deep water that was filled with bloated animal carcasses and other waste material. The fetid water enveloped me leaving a greasy film over my clothes and body. Every night when I returned to my flooded hotel, empty except for a nightwatchman, I bathed my shriveled feet in disinfectant.

 

Once I was almost sucked down into one of the holes in the street in Bombay into which water was rushing. It took every bit of my strength to keep from losing my balance. After that close call, I shuffled along, inch by inch, yard by yard, until I had to abandon my cautious instincts.

I had to see the monsoon as a predictable yearly event, and not the disaster it seemed to my western eyes. The farmers experience the monsoon as an almost religious experience as they watch their fields come back to life after being parched for half the year.

 

When I was in Porbundar, the historic birthplace of Gandhi, I came upon a dog. There he was, locked out of the house, standing on a tiny piece of concrete as the flood waters rose. His expression betrayed his emotions. You can tell by the picture that he realizes his predicament and hope his owner opens the door soon.

Actually, a moment after I took the picture, the door opened and he ran inside."- Steve Mccurry

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Order Monsoon by Steeve Mccurry:

http://www.amazon.com/Monsoon-Steve-McCurry/dp/0500541353/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1318962167&sr=8-1 ;

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Syria's refugees| Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario

Syria's refugees| Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Syrian refugees are held by the Jordanians for questions regarding their identities at an unofficial crossing point at the border between Syria and Jordan at Sharjarh, Jordan, April 10, 2013. Thousands of Syirans are crossing into Jordan each day across unofficial border points between the two countries, as Syrians flee ongoing fighting in their country. The United Nations estimates that the number of Syrian refugees is currently over one million, most of whom are living in neighboring countries, straining the resources of host countries."- Lynsey Addario

Photo report's insight:

Lynsey Addario is a photojournalist based in Istanbul, Turkey, where she works for National Geographic, the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine,Fortune, and other publications. She was born on November 13, 1973, in Norwalk, Connecticut.

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Cole Larson's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:09 AM

Well Syria shot themselves in the foot on that one. Three things why their "president" (Dictator) is not very good. 1. He is very power hungry and selfish. 2. He uses CHEMICAL weapons on HIS OWN PEOPLE yeah the people are sure going to vote for you on relection day. 3. He is very inmature and is in no shape to run a country or even his own life. Back to the refuges I think that yes there will be a lot of them, but at least they won't be a open target in their own houses anymore. Jordan please take these people in as your own. They have a bad leader who seems like hurting the people who build your coiuntry is okay.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:07 PM

Provides further insight on the migration of many Syrian refugees (UN estimates there are over 1 million) who are constantly on the move for they are being threatened/unable to return home/are in no-man's-land stuck in between Jordan and Syria, etc. 

- UNIT 2

Kyle Rutherford's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:38 PM

The Syrian refugees were influenced by a major push factor: war. Refugees are people who are forced to migrate from their home country and cannot return for fear of persecution because of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a social group, or political opinion. They hope to seek asylum in Jordan until war in their home country ceases but Jordan is running out of supplies to support these refugees.