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A DAY WITH PATIENCE | Photographer: Lisa Weatherbee

A DAY WITH PATIENCE | Photographer: Lisa Weatherbee | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lisa Weatherbee’s series, 'A Day with Patience', is a record of just that: one day spent with a twelve year old girl, Patience, in her village in Ghana.

Having joined Photographers Without Borders, she arranged to spend a day with a young woman that the organisation put her in touch with, and the results are an open-hearted study of a day in the life of someone with whom, outwardly, the photographer had little in common. Weatherbee uses natural light, and her palette is bright and fresh: at times, the images almost recall fashion photography in their easy movement and the clean lines of Patience’s school uniform. 


Throughout the series, Weatherbee’s gaze is unobtrusive; Patience meets the lens’s eye with steadiness and maturity, and it is her world that we find ourselves in. While meditative moments are duly recorded, however, the viewer cannot forget that Patience is still a child: in one image, she plays on a slide with abandon, a carefree moment that almost comes as a surprise after the seriousness and composure that is recorded in the rest of the series.

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Color or not color ? Steve McCurry répond | Serge Bouvet, photographe

Color or not color ? Steve McCurry répond | Serge Bouvet, photographe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Sur la couleur et noir et blanc, chacun à son avis sur la question. Steve McCurry que j’ai rencontré à trois reprises à Paris, m’en a touché deux mots. A juste titre, pour accompagner le sujet en beauté, je vous propose de télécharger 4 préréglages Kodachrome offerts !® que j’ai conçus pour mes travaux de photographie en noir et blanc. 


Dans le monde de la photographie, le nom de Steve McCurry est synonyme de regard . Ses nombreux portraits saisissants font de lui l’un des meilleurs portraitistes au monde. Une référence historique incontournable pour qui veut s’intéresser à l’histoire de la photographie. A mes yeux, au même titre que Raghubir Singh et de William Eggleston, Steve McCurry a donné ces lettres de noblesse à la photographie couleur.


Le 13 décembre 2015, lors des Master Class qui avaient eu lieu à Paris, Steve McCurry m’a appris qu’il avait un point commun avec Raghubir Singh : Cartier Bresson. Chacun ont en effet présenté humblement leurs photos au maître français. A Steve McCurry, il lui conseille la voie noble du noir et blanc. L’élève s’émancipera du conseil de son mentor. A Raghubir Singh qui avait pris le taureau par les cornes en venant directement dans son appartement proche du Louvre pour lui remettre son ouvrage en couleur, il n’émet pas même une critique à son endroit. Cartier Bresson feuilletera à peine son livre. Dédain blessant pour Raghubir Singh. Le maître avait le regard soupçonneux et l’avis d’un inquisiteur à l’égard de la couleur. On ne touche pas au noir et blanc ! (...)

 

 

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Photographer of the Year 2015 | Photojournalist: Jonas Gratzer

Photographer of the Year 2015 | Photojournalist: Jonas Gratzer | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Originally from Stockholm, Gratzer has been living in Bangkok with his wife and son since 2009. He has travelled throughout south-east Asia and the Indian subcontinent, focusing on rights issues such as child labour, human trafficking and women's rights, as well as environmental concerns. He has recently become a Getty Images contributor.

He said: "With my pictures I try to make people aware of what the daily struggle faced by millions of people across the continent. There are so many sides of Asia that are not pleasant. My major concern for the region is that corporations are eating up Asia and spreading like cancer. Many leaders in powerful positions turn a blind eye to what's happening in this part of the world. There is a sort of philosophy of 'money first and what happens next is not our concern.'"

Photo report's insight:

More photos of Jonas Gratzer at: http://www.jonasgratzer.com/

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Cuba | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Cuba | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Steve McCurry returned to Cuba in November, 2014 and photographed the streets of the capital. This trip was made only weeks before the Cuban and US governments announced the beginning of regular diplomatic relations.

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Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Usually, in India, the Muslim segregated areas are seen as ghettos. However, these should be seen as cultural pockets, where group solidarity is strong. Turkman Gate is the old city around which the New Delhi city has come up. It would be wrong to brand whole of Turkman Gate as a ghetto, as it houses various wholesale markets and different communities as well. Ghettos are usually formed by new migrants to the city to hold on to their culture in an alien environment. People have been living here since centuries; they are the real residents of Delhi city and still follow age-old ‘Delhi culture." Serge Bouvet

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Angels in hell | Photographer: Gmb Akash

Angels in hell | Photographer: Gmb Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Child labour is not a new issue in Bangladesh. as children remain here one of the most vulnerable groups living under threats of hunger, illiteracy, displacement, exploitation, trafficking, physical and mental abuse. Although the issue of child labor has always been discussed, there is hardly any remarkable progress even in terms of mitigation. 17.5 percent of total children of the 5-15 age groups are engaged in economic activities. Many of these children are engage in various hazardous occupations in manufacturing factories. Factory owners prefer to employ children as they could pay them less and also able to keep their factories free from trade unionism. a child labour gets taka 400 to 700 ( 1 USD = 70 taka) per month, while an adult worker earns up to taka 5000 per month.- Gmb Akash

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Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"For the past three decades as I traveled the world on assignment I
have witnessed children working in fields, factories, ditches, tunnels, mines, and ship-breaking yards. The scope of the problem is vast. Hundreds of millions of children spend their  childhood working and do not have an opportunity to play, go to school, or live in a healthy environment." - Steve McCurry

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Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov

Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Chittagong is one of the biggest ship breaking yards in the world. It is graveyard where ships are taken from all around the world for their last voyage, to be taken apart. 


Know for unsafe work practices and environmental pollution due to the demolition and ship breaking processes, Chittagong presents one of the biggest industry and job opportunities for many Bangladeshis.


Some 30, 000 workers are engaged in this scrapping in Bangladesh's Sitakunda coast, which houses the world's second largest ship-breaking industry after China. At least 250,000 people in the country live off the industry directly and indirectly, according to experts.


The industry is a critical contributor to the low-income country's economy, and Bangladesh relies on ship breaking for 80% of its steel needs. But along with the recyclable materials comes a lot of toxic junk and hazardous material such as asbestos.


Often unaware of the risks they face on a daily basis by carrying heavy loads, directly touching materials that are known to cause cancer (asbestos), the workers rarely take these risks into consideration. "I don't see any danger" said a 17 year old worker.


Living in a 3rd world country, taking care of a family, the priorities of workers in the yards of Chittagong have a different order. To be without a job, letting their families go hungry, represents a bigger treat to these men then working in an environment that can eventually lead to health issues or early death. 


Copyright Jana Asenbrennerova 2010 

Collaboration on access and text with Syed Zain Al-Mahmood

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World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST

World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
2014 PHOTO CONTEST

The World Press Photo of the Year 2013 is a picture by American photographer John Stanmeyer.

Judging
An international jury of leading professionals in the field of photojournalism worldwide began judging the entries at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam on 1 February.

Results
The results of the 2014 World Press Photo Contest were announced on 14 February. The prize-winning pictures will be presented in a year-long exhibition that travels through more than 100 cities in over 45 countries, to start in Amsterdam in De Nieuwe Kerk on 18 April 2014.

Prizes
The jury awarded first, second and third prizes in nine categories. First-prize winners receive a cash prize of €1,500. The premier award carries a cash prize of €10,000. In addition, Canon will donate a professional DSLR camera and lens kit to the author of the World Press Photo of the Year 2013. The annual Awards Days, a two-day celebration of the prizewinners, takes place in Amsterdam on 24 and 25 April 2014.

Photo report's insight:
View the entire collection of winning images from the 57th World Press Photo Contest. The winners were selected from more than 90,000 images submitted to the contest. 
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Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti

Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lorsque la capitale ukrainienne a sombré dans la violence après plusieurs semaines d'un bras de fer entre forces de l'ordre et manifestants pro-européens, le 22 janvier 2014,  les affrontements du centre-ville, notamment sur la place de l'Indépendance ont pris l'allure d'un champ de bataille cinématographique. 

 

Jamais la presse n'avait reçu des photographies aussi "belles" et "picturales". La photographie la plus emblématique qui a fait le tour du monde, est celle du photographe Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti.

Photo report's insight:

Autres photos sur le site du Monde : 
http://www.lemonde.fr/europe/visuel/2014/01/23/la-semaine-ou-kiev-s-est-embrasee_4353592_3214.html ;

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Real Toy Story | Photographer: Michael Wolf

Real Toy Story  | Photographer: Michael Wolf | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Covering gallery walls with over 20,000 castaway toys, German photographer Michael Wolf thrusts visitors into the heart of consumerism with his series Real Toy Story. Though Chinese culture has taken the world stage in recent years, Wolf has long called the city of Hong Kong his home, documenting its many multifaceted characteristics and quirks. Real Toy Story dissects China’s production factories with an acute and striking eye, capturing each and every aspect of constructing children’s toys which are shipped and sold to millions across the globe. Here we are able to peek inside the world’s largest inexpensive and mass-produced plastic toy market and meet some of the faces behind the large metal doors.

 

Ever examining the cacophony of populace and urban chaos, Wolf’s installation further highlights the volume of products fabricated and sold daily. His hunt for toys began in Californian flea markets while on vacation in the United States. Only collecting toys ‘Made in China,’ Wolf returned to Hong Kong with thousands of forsaken, used objects. By nestling each factory worker portrait into the jumble of dirty, discarded toys, Real Toy Storyexposes the overwhelming reality of worldwide manufacturing and consumption.

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Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com

Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Vidéo about Steve McCurry. Photographer Steve McCurry is known for his dramatic pictures, but the most famous shot he’s ever taken, a striking image of an Afghan girl, almost never got seen.

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Lighted Path's curator insight, December 13, 2013 9:48 PM

The story behind the image of the iconic Afghan girl and the photographer who took the shot.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, December 15, 2013 12:31 PM

Historias detrás de las fotografías en un libro del escritor Steve McCurry como por ejemplo la tan conocida de la chica Afgana de ojos claros.

Michel Prisca's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:46 PM

do I remember this Picture from the national geograpic Magazine??

 

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Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta

Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I went to Jakarta’s business district to find photos of middle-class workers returning to their homes. When I had finished, I realized that I had something different to shoot for the next day. I searched Google maps to find the location of the collapsed bridge but I couldn’t find the exact location. There was a blank map with only the name of the village, Sanghiang Tanjung. Surprisingly, it said the village was just 130 kms (80 miles) away from our Jakarta office – a travel time of about two hours. My estimation was it would take 4 hours.

 

3am Thursday morning, my friend and driver Soewarno and I headed to the village. We reached by 6am. But the difficulty was this village was just a blank area on the map. Also, we had to find the right direction that the students would take, so that I could take a pictures from the front, not from the back. We found many roads in the village but no one knew where the bridge was. With the help of my friends, we were able to get the name of the head of the village, Epi Sopian, who accompanied us to the location. Edi said the bridge collapsed during Saturday’s big flood when wood and bamboo hit the suspension bridge’s pillar.

 

I arrived at the location as the students were crossing. They were already in the middle of the bridge. Oh no, these could not be the children who wanted to go to school, I thought! It was more like an acrobatic show the collapsed bridge as an apparatus and without any safety device at all. They walked slowly, sometimes screaming as their shoes slipped. Suddenly the rain came. A last group of students, Sofiah and her friend, were on the bridge. Happily, all the students crossed safely. I took pictures for no more than five minutes. (...)

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India As I See It: Incredible Photos That Capture The Madness And Magic Of India

India As I See It: Incredible Photos That Capture The Madness And Magic Of India | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
For you, the native Indian, my perspective may seem trivial. Yet, I try to give you photographs charged with life and strange moments.
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Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui

Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Homes in the village of Denganmal in western India do not have running water. The only drinking water comes from two wells at the foot of a hill outside the village. The well is often so crowded that the walk and wait can take hours in the sweltering heat.

Photo report's insight:

"I am a television news correspondent turned photographer, working for Reuters in Mumbai. I was brought up in the Indian capital Delhi but have been posted in Mumbai since summer 2010. With Reuters, I made my foray into professional photography. I've been learning something new about photography everyday on the job. Apart from taking pictures to go with the daily news, I have a keen interest in shooting in depth features and multimedia."- Danish Siddiqui

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Afghanistan | Photojournalist: Altaf Qadri

Afghanistan | Photojournalist: Altaf Qadri | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Altaf Qadri is a Kashmiri-Indian photojournalist with Associated Press.He has received several awards for is photographic work. The New York Times described his work as having a "sophisticated eye and highly effective technique."

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L’histoire de Bilji, le Hijra de Kathputli Colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe

L’histoire de Bilji, le Hijra de Kathputli Colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Les bracelets roses de Bilji s’entrechoquent lorsqu’elle allume sa deuxième cigarette. Elle tire une taffe. Engoncée dans son pashmînâ pourpre qu’elle ne porte que pendant les fraîcheurs matinales, Bilji fait figure d’un chef sioux. Un chef sioux orné de bijoux de femmes.
Des volutes de fumée de tabac remontent à la surface de ses souvenirs.

« J’appartenais à la « famille » Kinar Bhadur Gad.» raconte Bilji en tapotant de son gros index noueux sa cigarette pour en faire tomber la cendre.
« J’ai rejoint le foyer de mon guru-ji, quand j’avais 16 ans. Mes parents ne m’ont pas retenu quand je suis parti rejoindre ma nouvelle famille. »

La plupart des habitants du bidonville sont issus d’une grande famille originaire du Rajasthan. Bijli est née à New Delhi. Son père, d’origine modeste, faisait bouillir la marmite familiale en vendant du thé.

 

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Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova

Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

The documentary was held in Norilsk between February 2012 and February 2013.
The documentary was supported by the Lagardère foundation grant for photography.

« Days of Night – Nights of Day » is about the daily life of the inhabitants of Norilsk, a mining city northernmost of the polar circle with a population of more than 170 000.  The city, its mines and metallurgical factories were constructed by prisoners of the Gulag.  With 60% of the present population involved in the industrial process, this documentary aims to investigate human adaptation to extreme climate, ecological disaster and isolation.
Norilsk is the 7th most polluted city in the world.  The average temperature is -10C, reaching lows of -55C in winter, when for two months the city is plunged into polar night.
The living conditions of the people of Norilsk are unique, making their plight incomparable. - Elena Chernyshova

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Menya’s Kids | Photographer: Myriam Abdelaziz

Menya’s Kids | Photographer: Myriam Abdelaziz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Menya’s Kids, French photographer Myriam Abdelaziz bears witness to the child labor that persists in the limestone quarries of the city. Situated along the Nile River’s western bank, Menya is host to over 300 quarries employing an estimated 15,000 individuals, many of whom are children who have left school in hopes of pulling their families out of poverty.

 

From the inexperienced age of ten, youngsters enter the quarries to collect bricks carved from the mines, facing both short and longterm dangers. Many are killed or electrocuted by elementary machinery, their limbs severed by the stone-cutting blades. Others face lifelong respiratory illness from limestone dust inhalation. For a $15 weekly salary, the kids awake at dawn and are shuttled to the worksites in darkness so as to avoid the brutal heat of midday. In summer, the temperatures exceed 100 degrees fahrenheit, and the children work from 4:00 in the afternoon to 3:00 in the morning. In the winter, they work in below freezing temperatures from 7:00 AM to 4:00 PM, with little protection from the elements.

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Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


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LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014

LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
LIVING UNNOTICED13 February 2013

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has no law that makes homosexuality illegal in the country, but there is no societal acceptance for it, which makes the idea of equal treatment under the law a fantasy. Gay people there often choose to remain hidden to protect themselves from physical danger and social stigmatization. At this point, there is almost no legal support for the gay community outside the occasional gesture from international sources and NGOs.

 

Rainbow Sunrise was founded in 2011 by Joseph Saidi, 26, to support the gay community in the city of Bukavu in the eastern DRC. Progress is slow due to a lack of funds, but the organization plays a critical role for local gay men and women, providing free HIV testing, condoms, sexual education, and perhaps most importantly, a safe place to share their personal struggles with others, without having to feel ashamed, rejected, or judged.

 

Saidi was attacked and jailed for several days in May 2013: “When I was in prison, I spent two days without food or drink. I was tortured, and I was raped by three inmates. I suffered from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. I was discriminated against based on my sexual orientation. I was beaten by inmates. I thought I was going to die because since my birth I've never been subjected to such treatment.”

 

Photo report's insight:
TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
SHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 320F-STOP: 2.0FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mm  
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Lynchage public à Bangui | Photographer: Siegfried Modola / Reuters

Lynchage public à Bangui | Photographer: Siegfried Modola / Reuters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Attention images choquantes. Scène d'extrême violence à Bangui. Soupçonné d'être un combattant de la Seleka, l'armée des rebelles, un homme a été accusé, tué puis mutilé par les FACA (Forces armées centrafricaines). Cet évènement terrible a eu lieu quelques minutes après la venue de la Présidente par intérim, Catherine Samba Panza au Collège National de l'administration et de la magistrature. Elle y demandait le retour de l'ordre et la renaissance de l'armée nationale. - Paris Match

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Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich

Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Curtis "Rebel" Rageur sits on the bow, hat backwards, eyes watchful. He gives a thumbs-down to Julius Gaudet, 62, letting him know that the line they set the day before is in the water. Julius pulls the boat to a stop near the shore of Shell Island, Louisiana as Rebel searches for the line with his gaff. He finds it, pulling hand-over-fist, as if reeling in a large fish. With a splash, the reptilian head emerges suddenly from the water and Julius leans over the edge, putting one 9mm round through it's brain. The two hunters pull their prey into the boat, tag it and toss it onto the deck, which will soon be stacked high with the rest of the day's haul. Rebel turns to me, wiping blood onto his pants, and with a smile says, "And that's how we do the gator dance." 

 

The state of Louisiana is home to the largest alligator population in the United States, estimated to be almost 2 million. Alligators are North America's largest reptiles and are considered a renewable resource in an industry that has thrived in America's deep south for centuries. The first large alligator harvests occurred during the early 1800s. During the Civil War, alligator skins were used to make shoes and saddles for confederate troops. The alligator farming industry in Louisiana alone annually harvests 140,000-170,000 gators which are valued at over $12,000,000.  - Matt Eich

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Alessandro Zanini's curator insight, February 9, 2014 9:16 AM

Cacciatori di alligatori in Louisiana. 

 

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In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“My first inspirations were world-changers like James Nachtwey, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry. I firmly believe that photography has a role to play in provoking thought, spurring dialogue, and prompting action—therein being a potentially potent ingredient in an antidote to social evils.

“Photographs are informative, a record of what we do and value, and contribute important subjective testimonies for history.

 

That said, worldwide trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with over 700,000 women moved across international borders annually. It is not at all realistic to imagine photos making any substantial dent to improve this situation. The photos I take will do little to directly improve the lives of women and children in Sonagachi.

 

“To do this would take massive political, economic and legal overhauls, not to mention years of reshaping social values. This was one of my hardest realizations when following apparently humanistic callings. That images can, however, give people a voice and better inform a public debate, is some journalistic consolation. What makes it immediately worthwhile for me is the experience of earning an individual’s trust, and for a while, touching lives, sharing stories and learning from each other in a dignified, respectful, curious manner. This is the only honest thing I can convince people of offering them, and surprisingly it is also what seems to open the most doors for me.” - Souvid Datta

Photo report's insight:

Mumbai-born photographer Souvid Datta is a young man of 21 whose age puts him somewhere in between the subjects he’s been documenting in the infamous red-light district of Kolkata, India and the subjects’ children. His series, In the Shadows of Kolkata, portrays a close-knit group of female sex workers, a few of their clients, and their children. Exploring the lives of sex workers as a photographic “theme” never fails to affect, and seeing children interspersed into this work adds another layer of difficult material to digest, question, process

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Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.

Photo report's insight:

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 13, 2014 5:09 AM

Police corruption in india