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Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"For the past three decades as I traveled the world on assignment I
have witnessed children working in fields, factories, ditches, tunnels, mines, and ship-breaking yards. The scope of the problem is vast. Hundreds of millions of children spend their  childhood working and do not have an opportunity to play, go to school, or live in a healthy environment." - Steve McCurry

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Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov

Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Chittagong is one of the biggest ship breaking yards in the world. It is graveyard where ships are taken from all around the world for their last voyage, to be taken apart. 


Know for unsafe work practices and environmental pollution due to the demolition and ship breaking processes, Chittagong presents one of the biggest industry and job opportunities for many Bangladeshis.


Some 30, 000 workers are engaged in this scrapping in Bangladesh's Sitakunda coast, which houses the world's second largest ship-breaking industry after China. At least 250,000 people in the country live off the industry directly and indirectly, according to experts.


The industry is a critical contributor to the low-income country's economy, and Bangladesh relies on ship breaking for 80% of its steel needs. But along with the recyclable materials comes a lot of toxic junk and hazardous material such as asbestos.


Often unaware of the risks they face on a daily basis by carrying heavy loads, directly touching materials that are known to cause cancer (asbestos), the workers rarely take these risks into consideration. "I don't see any danger" said a 17 year old worker.


Living in a 3rd world country, taking care of a family, the priorities of workers in the yards of Chittagong have a different order. To be without a job, letting their families go hungry, represents a bigger treat to these men then working in an environment that can eventually lead to health issues or early death. 


Copyright Jana Asenbrennerova 2010 

Collaboration on access and text with Syed Zain Al-Mahmood

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World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST

World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
2014 PHOTO CONTEST

The World Press Photo of the Year 2013 is a picture by American photographer John Stanmeyer.

Judging
An international jury of leading professionals in the field of photojournalism worldwide began judging the entries at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam on 1 February.

Results
The results of the 2014 World Press Photo Contest were announced on 14 February. The prize-winning pictures will be presented in a year-long exhibition that travels through more than 100 cities in over 45 countries, to start in Amsterdam in De Nieuwe Kerk on 18 April 2014.

Prizes
The jury awarded first, second and third prizes in nine categories. First-prize winners receive a cash prize of €1,500. The premier award carries a cash prize of €10,000. In addition, Canon will donate a professional DSLR camera and lens kit to the author of the World Press Photo of the Year 2013. The annual Awards Days, a two-day celebration of the prizewinners, takes place in Amsterdam on 24 and 25 April 2014.

Photo report's insight:
View the entire collection of winning images from the 57th World Press Photo Contest. The winners were selected from more than 90,000 images submitted to the contest. 
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Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti

Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lorsque la capitale ukrainienne a sombré dans la violence après plusieurs semaines d'un bras de fer entre forces de l'ordre et manifestants pro-européens, le 22 janvier 2014,  les affrontements du centre-ville, notamment sur la place de l'Indépendance ont pris l'allure d'un champ de bataille cinématographique. 

 

Jamais la presse n'avait reçu des photographies aussi "belles" et "picturales". La photographie la plus emblématique qui a fait le tour du monde, est celle du photographe Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti.

Photo report's insight:

Autres photos sur le site du Monde : 
http://www.lemonde.fr/europe/visuel/2014/01/23/la-semaine-ou-kiev-s-est-embrasee_4353592_3214.html ;

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Real Toy Story | Photographer: Michael Wolf

Real Toy Story  | Photographer: Michael Wolf | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Covering gallery walls with over 20,000 castaway toys, German photographer Michael Wolf thrusts visitors into the heart of consumerism with his series Real Toy Story. Though Chinese culture has taken the world stage in recent years, Wolf has long called the city of Hong Kong his home, documenting its many multifaceted characteristics and quirks. Real Toy Story dissects China’s production factories with an acute and striking eye, capturing each and every aspect of constructing children’s toys which are shipped and sold to millions across the globe. Here we are able to peek inside the world’s largest inexpensive and mass-produced plastic toy market and meet some of the faces behind the large metal doors.

 

Ever examining the cacophony of populace and urban chaos, Wolf’s installation further highlights the volume of products fabricated and sold daily. His hunt for toys began in Californian flea markets while on vacation in the United States. Only collecting toys ‘Made in China,’ Wolf returned to Hong Kong with thousands of forsaken, used objects. By nestling each factory worker portrait into the jumble of dirty, discarded toys, Real Toy Storyexposes the overwhelming reality of worldwide manufacturing and consumption.

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Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com

Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Vidéo about Steve McCurry. Photographer Steve McCurry is known for his dramatic pictures, but the most famous shot he’s ever taken, a striking image of an Afghan girl, almost never got seen.

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Lighted Path's curator insight, December 13, 2013 6:48 PM

The story behind the image of the iconic Afghan girl and the photographer who took the shot.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, December 15, 2013 9:31 AM

Historias detrás de las fotografías en un libro del escritor Steve McCurry como por ejemplo la tan conocida de la chica Afgana de ojos claros.

Michel Prisca's curator insight, December 16, 2013 9:46 AM

do I remember this Picture from the national geograpic Magazine??

 

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Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta

Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I went to Jakarta’s business district to find photos of middle-class workers returning to their homes. When I had finished, I realized that I had something different to shoot for the next day. I searched Google maps to find the location of the collapsed bridge but I couldn’t find the exact location. There was a blank map with only the name of the village, Sanghiang Tanjung. Surprisingly, it said the village was just 130 kms (80 miles) away from our Jakarta office – a travel time of about two hours. My estimation was it would take 4 hours.

 

3am Thursday morning, my friend and driver Soewarno and I headed to the village. We reached by 6am. But the difficulty was this village was just a blank area on the map. Also, we had to find the right direction that the students would take, so that I could take a pictures from the front, not from the back. We found many roads in the village but no one knew where the bridge was. With the help of my friends, we were able to get the name of the head of the village, Epi Sopian, who accompanied us to the location. Edi said the bridge collapsed during Saturday’s big flood when wood and bamboo hit the suspension bridge’s pillar.

 

I arrived at the location as the students were crossing. They were already in the middle of the bridge. Oh no, these could not be the children who wanted to go to school, I thought! It was more like an acrobatic show the collapsed bridge as an apparatus and without any safety device at all. They walked slowly, sometimes screaming as their shoes slipped. Suddenly the rain came. A last group of students, Sofiah and her friend, were on the bridge. Happily, all the students crossed safely. I took pictures for no more than five minutes. (...)

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Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez

Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Violence and death are always present and tangible in Guatemala. The population seems to accept it as normal, even more so when women are the victims. In many cases, society simply ignores it, sits in silence or turns a blind eye.

 

Many men treat women as if they have no rights, thinking it unusual that someone should be punished or fined for beating, raping or killing them.

In Guatemala, violence against women generally starts behind the walls of their own homes. The aggressors in most cases are the men closest to them: fathers, brothers, cousins and partners.

 

There are now laws to protect women but there is little education, information or willingness to report crimes. The male perpetrators themselves often don’t seem to understand why they are being arrested. Prosecutors told me that they often hear from men accused of such crimes: “Why am I being arrested? I only hit my wife.” - Jorge Dan Lopez 



Photo report's insight:

"I was born in Guerrero State, in southern Mexico, a depressed region with large indigenous population. I began to take photos when I moved to Mexico City in the year 2000. After several courses in the capital I traveled to Italy in 2002 to live and photograph for diverse media until 2006. That year, one of great political and social change in Mexico, I returned to work for a financial newspaper and began with Reuters in 2008. I've been in Guatemala for Reuters since June of 2011." - Jorge Dan Lopez

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In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY

In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
After 150 years of broken promises, the Oglala Lakota people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota are nurturing their tribal customs, language, and beliefs. A rare, intimate portrait shows their resilience in the face of hardship. 

Almost every historical atrocity has a geographically symbolic core, a place whose name conjures up the trauma of a whole people: Auschwitz, Robben Island, Nanjing. For the Oglala Lakota of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that place is a site near Wounded Knee Creek, 16 miles northeast of the town of Pine Ridge. From a distance the hill is unremarkable, another picturesque tree-spotted mound in the creased prairie. But here at the mass grave of all those who were killed on a winter morning more than a century ago, it’s easy to believe that certain energies—acts of tremendous violence and of transcendent love—hang in the air forever and possess a forever half-life.

 

Alex White Plume, a 60-year-old Oglala Lakota activist, lives with his family and extended family on a 2,000-acre ranch near Wounded Knee Creek. White Plume’s land is lovely beyond any singing, rolling out from sage-covered knolls to creeks bruised with late summer lushness. From certain aspects, you can see the Badlands, all sun-bleached spires and scoured pinnacles. And looking another way, you can see the horizon-crowning darkness of the Black Hills of South Dakota.

 

One hot and humid day in early August, I drove out to interview White Plume in a screened outdoor kitchen he had just built for his wife. Hemp plants sprouted thickly all over their garden. “Go ahead and smoke as much as you like,” White Plume offered. “I always tell people that: Smoke as much as you want, but you won’t get very high.” The plants are remnants from a plantation of industrial hemp—low-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) Cannabis sativa—cultivated by the White Plume family in 2000.

Fuller text: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/08/pine-ridge/fuller-text 
Photo report's insight:

Aaron Huey is a National Geographic photographer and a Contributing Editor for Harper's Magazine. He is based in Seattle, WA.

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India stray dogs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

India stray dogs | Photographer:  Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

English:
"No country has as many stray dogs as India, and no country suffers as much from them. Free-roaming dogs number in the tens of millions and bite millions of people annually, including vast numbers of children. An estimated 20,000 people die every year from rabies infections — more than a third of the global rabies toll."

 - Serge BouvetFrançais: 
"Chaque année, 30.000 personnes meurent chaque année de la rage en Inde (70% des décès dans le monde) à cause de la morsure de chiens parias. Il est estimé qu’en Inde, une personne meurt de la rage à tous les 30 minutes. Environ 70% des victimes sont des enfants de moins de 15 ans."- Serge Bouvet

 

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Pakistan in Kodachrome | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

Pakistan in Kodachrome | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Samuel Aranda Phototographer
Photo report's insight:

Aranda began to work as a photographer for newspapers El País and El Periódico de Catalunya at the age of 19. Two years later he traveled to the Middle East, where he covered the Israeli–Palestinian conflict for the Spanish news agency EFE.

In 2004 Aranda begun working for AFP, covering stories in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The photojournalist association ANIGP-TV awarded Arandas feature documentary about African immigrants trying to reach Europe with the Spanish National Award of Photography. Since 2006 he is working as a freelance photojournalist.

 

In 2011 Aranda covered the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen. In February 2012 he was awarded the World Press Photo of the Year 2011. The winning picture shows an a woman embracing her son,  wounded during clashes against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, part of the Arab Spring.

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Witness to a Massacre in a Nairobi Mall | Photojournalist: Tyler Hicks

Witness to a Massacre in a Nairobi Mall | Photojournalist: Tyler Hicks | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Tyler Hicks, a Times photographer, was nearby when gunmen opened fire on an upscale Kenyan mall.
Photo report's insight:

" I was at a framing shop in an adjacent mall picking up some photographs that had been given to me as gifts by photojournalists who attended my wedding. I was very close. I didn’t have all of my equipment, just had a small camera that I always have with me in case something happens.

I ran over to the mall and I was able to photograph until my wife [Nichole Sobecki], who is also a photojournalist and was at our house, was able to collect my Kevlar helmet and professional cameras before she came to cover the news herself.

Tyler Hicks/The New York TimesPolice and soldiers swept through the mall to pursue the assailants and to help civilians escape to safety.

When I left the framing shop, I could see right away that there was something serious going on, because there were lots of people running away from the mall. I ran over there and within minutes I could see people who had been shot in the leg or stomach from what appeared to be small arms fire being helped by other civilians. This went on for about 30 minutes.

The mall is Nairobi’s most high-end shopping center, completely up to Western standards, with movie theaters, nice cafes, supermarkets and a casino. Pretty much anything you need. I’ve been there, so I knew the layout inside.

From the beginning I wanted to get with some security forces inside the mall.

Tyler Hicks/The New York TimesGlass was shattered inside the mall.

We managed to find an entrance where people who were hiding inside the mall were coming out. We ran into that service entrance and we hooked up with some police who let us stay with them as they did security sweeps clearing different stores — very much like what you see when the military enters a village. Shop to shop and aisle to aisle, looking for the shooters who were still inside." - Tyler Hicks

 
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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, September 24, 2013 6:55 AM

Photos from Nairobi Mall. Not easy to watch, but the photos are good.

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Healthcare in Mississipi: Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario

Healthcare in Mississipi: Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nowhere is the American health care system more broken and desperate than rural Mississippi. Which is why an approach born in a broken and desperate place — Iran — may offer the best chance of saving lives. Photographer Lynsey Addario visited the impoverished state of Mississippi to explore this new approach to health care and hear some of the stories of those suffering from health problems." - Lynsey Addario

Photo report's insight:

Photographer Lynsey Addario visited the impoverished state of Mississippi to explore this new approach to health care and hear some of the stories of those suffering from health problems.

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Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


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LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014

LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
LIVING UNNOTICED13 February 2013

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has no law that makes homosexuality illegal in the country, but there is no societal acceptance for it, which makes the idea of equal treatment under the law a fantasy. Gay people there often choose to remain hidden to protect themselves from physical danger and social stigmatization. At this point, there is almost no legal support for the gay community outside the occasional gesture from international sources and NGOs.

 

Rainbow Sunrise was founded in 2011 by Joseph Saidi, 26, to support the gay community in the city of Bukavu in the eastern DRC. Progress is slow due to a lack of funds, but the organization plays a critical role for local gay men and women, providing free HIV testing, condoms, sexual education, and perhaps most importantly, a safe place to share their personal struggles with others, without having to feel ashamed, rejected, or judged.

 

Saidi was attacked and jailed for several days in May 2013: “When I was in prison, I spent two days without food or drink. I was tortured, and I was raped by three inmates. I suffered from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. I was discriminated against based on my sexual orientation. I was beaten by inmates. I thought I was going to die because since my birth I've never been subjected to such treatment.”

 

Photo report's insight:
TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
SHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 320F-STOP: 2.0FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mm  
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Lynchage public à Bangui | Photographer: Siegfried Modola / Reuters

Lynchage public à Bangui | Photographer: Siegfried Modola / Reuters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Attention images choquantes. Scène d'extrême violence à Bangui. Soupçonné d'être un combattant de la Seleka, l'armée des rebelles, un homme a été accusé, tué puis mutilé par les FACA (Forces armées centrafricaines). Cet évènement terrible a eu lieu quelques minutes après la venue de la Présidente par intérim, Catherine Samba Panza au Collège National de l'administration et de la magistrature. Elle y demandait le retour de l'ordre et la renaissance de l'armée nationale. - Paris Match

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Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich

Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Curtis "Rebel" Rageur sits on the bow, hat backwards, eyes watchful. He gives a thumbs-down to Julius Gaudet, 62, letting him know that the line they set the day before is in the water. Julius pulls the boat to a stop near the shore of Shell Island, Louisiana as Rebel searches for the line with his gaff. He finds it, pulling hand-over-fist, as if reeling in a large fish. With a splash, the reptilian head emerges suddenly from the water and Julius leans over the edge, putting one 9mm round through it's brain. The two hunters pull their prey into the boat, tag it and toss it onto the deck, which will soon be stacked high with the rest of the day's haul. Rebel turns to me, wiping blood onto his pants, and with a smile says, "And that's how we do the gator dance." 

 

The state of Louisiana is home to the largest alligator population in the United States, estimated to be almost 2 million. Alligators are North America's largest reptiles and are considered a renewable resource in an industry that has thrived in America's deep south for centuries. The first large alligator harvests occurred during the early 1800s. During the Civil War, alligator skins were used to make shoes and saddles for confederate troops. The alligator farming industry in Louisiana alone annually harvests 140,000-170,000 gators which are valued at over $12,000,000.  - Matt Eich

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Alessandro Zanini's curator insight, February 9, 6:16 AM

Cacciatori di alligatori in Louisiana. 

 

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In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“My first inspirations were world-changers like James Nachtwey, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry. I firmly believe that photography has a role to play in provoking thought, spurring dialogue, and prompting action—therein being a potentially potent ingredient in an antidote to social evils.

“Photographs are informative, a record of what we do and value, and contribute important subjective testimonies for history.

 

That said, worldwide trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with over 700,000 women moved across international borders annually. It is not at all realistic to imagine photos making any substantial dent to improve this situation. The photos I take will do little to directly improve the lives of women and children in Sonagachi.

 

“To do this would take massive political, economic and legal overhauls, not to mention years of reshaping social values. This was one of my hardest realizations when following apparently humanistic callings. That images can, however, give people a voice and better inform a public debate, is some journalistic consolation. What makes it immediately worthwhile for me is the experience of earning an individual’s trust, and for a while, touching lives, sharing stories and learning from each other in a dignified, respectful, curious manner. This is the only honest thing I can convince people of offering them, and surprisingly it is also what seems to open the most doors for me.” - Souvid Datta

Photo report's insight:

Mumbai-born photographer Souvid Datta is a young man of 21 whose age puts him somewhere in between the subjects he’s been documenting in the infamous red-light district of Kolkata, India and the subjects’ children. His series, In the Shadows of Kolkata, portrays a close-knit group of female sex workers, a few of their clients, and their children. Exploring the lives of sex workers as a photographic “theme” never fails to affect, and seeing children interspersed into this work adds another layer of difficult material to digest, question, process

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Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.

Photo report's insight:

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 13, 2:09 AM

Police corruption in india

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Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez

Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The clock on the wall marked four in the morning. It was a cold and wet Saturday in July, but I was sitting in the warm offices of El Salvador’s Red Cross. Suddenly, the relative calm and silence in the emergency unit was interrupted when the phone rang. The loud noise made me jump. The phone operator said: “What is your name? If you don’t identify yourself, we can’t help you.”

 

I went to the operator and asked him what was happening. He said that there had been a report of a woman who had been beaten, raped several times and then left for dead in a ditch. He said that they would take her to hospital because of the severity of her injuries and I asked to go along.

 

When I got to where she had been found, I saw a woman dressed in a baby blue dress that was dirty all over, with a face disfigured by the blows she had received. She was disoriented and her gaze seemed lost in a void. She kept on repeating that her name was Claudia (...) - Ulises Rodriguez

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LETTER FROM AFGHANISTAN | Photojournalist: AARON HUEY

LETTER FROM AFGHANISTAN | Photojournalist: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"In the main square in Tirin Kot, the capital of Uruzgan Province, in central Afghanistan, a large billboard shows a human skeleton being hanged. The rope is not a normal gallows rope but the stem of an opium poppy. Aside from this jarring image, Tirin Kot is a bucolic-seeming place, a market town of flat-topped adobe houses and little shops on a low bluff on the eastern shore of the Tirinrud River, in a long valley bounded by open desert and jagged, treeless mountains.

 

About ten thousand people live in the town. The men are bearded and wear traditional robes and tunics and cover their heads with turbans or sequinned skullcaps. There are virtually no women in sight, and when they do appear they wear all-concealing burkas. A few paved streets join at a traffic circle in the center of town, but within a few blocks they peter out to dirt tracks.

 

Almost everything around Tirin Kot is some shade of brown. The river is a khaki-colored wash of silt and snowmelt that flows out of the mountain range to the north, past mud-walled family compounds. On either side of the river, however, running down the valley, there is a narrow strip of wheat fields and poppy fields, and for several weeks in the spring the poppies bloom: lovely, open-petalled white, pink, red, and magenta blossoms, the darker colors indicating the ones with the most opium."


Full text of article: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/07/09/070709fa_fact_anderson

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Only Unity - | Photographer: Matt Lutton

Only Unity -  | Photographer: Matt Lutton | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Only Unity”: Serbia In The Aftermath of Yugoslavia has emerged from five years of living and working in the Balkans; it is my personal response to the confounding atmosphere of the region. My project presents a psychological portrait of Serbs from across the Balkans as they confront a radically changed landscape within physically contracting borders. Serbia is emerging from the hangover of the 1990s, where atrocities were carried out in their name just across newborn borders, and constructive reflection about the consequences of those years is over due.

 

I am photographing details of society that both reflect and undermine the popular Serbian creation myths. Many issues are rooted in the complicated phrase “Only Unity Saves the Serbs” which was popular in the narrative of mass political manipulation during the disintegration of Yugoslavia and the wars that took place in its vacuum. Serbia is still recovering from the post- traumatic stress of those years, leading to a national confusion about their identity and a productive path forward.

I have focused on diverse subjects within the Serbian landscape which are far removed from any reality espoused by politicians. Young men and women are being raised in a divided, uncertain atmosphere and I hope to capture that essence so that we can further consider the implications of a Balkan region that is led by this generation. It is impossible to analyze or understand any event in this region without first considering its historical roots. I am interested in exploring and understanding the parts of today’s Balkan society that the next generation will read about in their history textbooks. What is happening now in the streets and in political negotiations will have profound impact on regional stability in the future.

 

There are many elements that contribute to a hostile and sometimes desperate atmosphere in Serbia today. But there too are moments that show healing and a glimpse at a different future than many have seen for themselves in the last decade. The growing pains of this developing democracy must continue to be carefully documented and explored, as the battles of the 1990s have yet to be finally played out. I’ve experienced alarming apathy and lack of compassion from many youth across the Balkans, and I hope to confront them directly with a different picture of the countries and history they will inherit. I hope my pictures will help bridge local borders, real and imagined. - Matt Lutton

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Bibi Aisha | Photographer: Jodi Bieber

Bibi Aisha | Photographer: Jodi Bieber | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
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Bibi Aisha (Pashto: بی بی عایشه‎; Bibi is a term of respect meaning "Lady"; born Aisha Mohammadzai, legal name Aesha Mohammadzai) is an Afghan woman whose mutilated face appeared on the cover of Time magazine in summer 2010. Her story first appeared in the Daily Beast in December 2009, which prompted doctors to write in offering to help her. The Grossman Burn Foundation in California pledged to perform reconstructive surgery on her and began organizing for her visa in the early spring of 2010. Diane Sawyer of ABC News also covered her ordeal in March 2010.

 

In a practice known as baad, Aisha's father promised her to a Taliban fighter when she was 12 years old as compensation for a killing that a member of her family had committed. She was married at 14 and subjected to constant abuse. At 18, she fled the abuse but was caught by police, jailed, and returned to her family. Her father returned her to her in-laws. To take revenge on her escape, her father-in-law, husband, and three other family members took Aisha into the mountains, cut off her nose and her ears, and left her to die. Bibi was later rescued by aid workers and the U.S. military. Some sources disputed the role of any members of the Taliban in her mutilation at the time it happened.

Aisha was featured on an August 2010 cover of Time magazine and in a corresponding article, "Afghan Women and the Return of the Taliban."

The cover image generated enormous controversy.

 

 The image and the accompanying cover title, "What Happens if We Leave Afghanistan," fueled debate about the merits of the Afghan War.

The photo was taken by the South African photographer Jodi Bieber and was awarded the World Press Photo Award for 2010. The image of Aisha is sometimes compared to the 'Afghan Girl' photograph of Sharbat Gula taken by Steve McCurry.

Shortly after Time's cover ran, Aisha was flown to the United States to receive free reconstructive surgery.

 

In May 2012 CNN.com ran an article about Aisha's activity. Since coming to the United States in August 2010, surgeons concluded she is mentally incompetent to handle the patient responsibilities in the surgical recovery regimen. Her psychologist, Shiphra Bakhchi, diagnosed her with borderline personality disorder, which may have been innately pre-existing throughout her life. She was taken in by the Women for Afghan Women shelter in Queens, New York and has subsequently moved to a family situation in Maryland.

 

The May 2012 CNN article by Jessica Ravitz explored the challenges faced by Aisha during her integration into a globalized world. "[S]he's been passed around by well-meaning strangers, showcased like a star and shielded like a fragile child," Ravitz reports. Its focus on Aisha as an autonomous person, rather than a poster child, serves as a portrait of the difficulties faced by trauma survivors and those that assist them.

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Thailand blooded month | Photojournalist: Jack Picone

Thailand blooded month | Photojournalist: Jack Picone | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jack Picone is a Bangkok based, award winning Australian Photojournalist who has been covering war zones since the early 90s. Picone has travelled from the Middle East to Eastern Europe and Africa—where he covered the 1994 Rwandan Genocide that saw over a million people murdered. In short, he’s the guy to talk to if you have any questions about catching shrapnel in Armenia, the difference between rebel wars and traditional wars, and the importance of documentary photography.

 

Jack's work is enormously diverse, characterized by insights that come from a non-intrusive approach and unhurried time spent with his subjects.

His portfolio includes portraits of artists and achievers, memorable war zone imagery and fascinating studies of tribal cultures. He has documented the drug culture of heroin addicts in the slums of Glasgow, the spirit of Australia's itinerant sheep shearers, the impact of conflict on civilians and children, the ancient rituals of body scarring and stick-fighting among the Nuba people of Sudan, and the day to day life of young Australians living with 

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Monsoon | Photojournalism: Steve McCurry

Monsoon | Photojournalism: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I was eleven years old when I saw a photo essay on the monsoon in India in Life Magazine by Brian Brake, the New Zealand-born Magnum photographer.

His work established his reputation as a master color photoessayist. Twenty years later, I proposed a story to National Geographic to photograph the monsoon. The next year I joined Magnum Photos.

People have often asked me what it was like spending almost a year photographing the monsoon. I spent several months following the monsoon which affects half the people on the planet.

Weather is often my best ally as I try to capture the perfect mood for my pictures, but photographing the monsoon was an experience that taught me a lot about patience and humility.

 

Photographing in heavy rain is difficult because you have to constantly wipe the rain drops from the camera lens. That takes about a third of the time. Monsoon rain is accompanied by winds that try to wrestle away the umbrella that is wedged between my head and shoulders.

I spent four days, in a flooded city in Gujarat, India, wading around the streets in waist-deep water that was filled with bloated animal carcasses and other waste material. The fetid water enveloped me leaving a greasy film over my clothes and body. Every night when I returned to my flooded hotel, empty except for a nightwatchman, I bathed my shriveled feet in disinfectant.

 

Once I was almost sucked down into one of the holes in the street in Bombay into which water was rushing. It took every bit of my strength to keep from losing my balance. After that close call, I shuffled along, inch by inch, yard by yard, until I had to abandon my cautious instincts.

I had to see the monsoon as a predictable yearly event, and not the disaster it seemed to my western eyes. The farmers experience the monsoon as an almost religious experience as they watch their fields come back to life after being parched for half the year.

 

When I was in Porbundar, the historic birthplace of Gandhi, I came upon a dog. There he was, locked out of the house, standing on a tiny piece of concrete as the flood waters rose. His expression betrayed his emotions. You can tell by the picture that he realizes his predicament and hope his owner opens the door soon.

Actually, a moment after I took the picture, the door opened and he ran inside."- Steve Mccurry

Photo report's insight:

Order Monsoon by Steeve Mccurry:

http://www.amazon.com/Monsoon-Steve-McCurry/dp/0500541353/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1318962167&sr=8-1 ;

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