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Congo (Belge) | Photographer: Carl de Keyzer

Congo (Belge) | Photographer: Carl de Keyzer | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As a member of Magnum for almost 20 years, Belgian photographer Carl de Keyzer has published several books, shooting projects across the globe in Europe, Russia, Asia, and the U.S. His strength lies in his ability to consistently capture pointed, expressive moments within daily life. For the photographs in Congo, he took five trips over two years to document the life of a post-colonial nation. “I decided to use a 1954 tourist guide for the Congo – at that time still a Belgian colony. Visiting all kinds of colonial backgrounds – mines, factories, schools, monasteries, churches, prisons. In fact it’s more a project about Belgium itself. A small European country (80 times smaller) being arrogant enough to export their own surrealism to the heart of Africa.”

 

The photographs were made into a series of two books in 2009 and 2010,Congo (Belge) and Congo Belge en images. The first book consisted of his contemporary photographs (tour guide) and the second included a selection of remastered glass negatives of the birth of the colony (1890 – 1920). Each photograph implies a story or carries a message—all focus on the people in the situation, all cross the line between straightforward photojournalism and a richer, more artful documentary style. “I tend to engage in long-term projects. I prefer to stay in a country for a longish period in order to get a better feeling of what is going on there. I prefer complex images because they reflect the complexity of life itself. There is a conflict between the utilitarian aspect of certain images taken for a precise purpose and photographs expressing a more personal viewpoint. I am always somewhere in the middle. Can you really grasp a situation through a picture? Yes, perhaps. You try, even if you stay a stranger looking in from the outside. What you are aiming at is photographs showing situations that have repercussions on people’s lives. That is why I am a photographer.”

Photo report's insight:

Link info:
The portfolio is on Projects : 2009 Congo (Belge)

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Dream Mumbai | Photographer: Kainaz Amaria

Dream Mumbai | Photographer: Kainaz Amaria | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dream Mumbai is a project born out of a survival instinct. When I first arrived to Mumbai my senses were on overload. Even the simplest of tasks – crossing the street or buying a piece of fruit – struck me with a tinge of terror. In order to acclimate myself to the city I began taking long walks with a camera. The walks made me familiar with her neighboring geography. The images helped me understand the people living in the neighborhoods.

Collectively the images create a visual diary – pixel moments, but also a statement on the complexities of a developing dreamland. Mumbai is a city with constant contradictions; it can fill and crush your soul in the very same moment. These images offer a glimpse into the variety of daily emotions and landscapes one can witness whilst walking the streets of Mumbai.

Photo report's insight:

Ever since she was young, Kainaz has been keenly curious about everything and everyone around her. She loves meeting new people, entering unfamiliar situations and listening to new perspectives.

 

Kainaz has a B. A. in international relations and political science from Boston University and an M.A. in photography from the School of Visual Communication, Ohio University. In 2010 she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to Mumbai, India.

 

Her images and multimedia collaborations have been recognized by contests including CPOY, Women in Photojournalism, Atlanta Photojournalism Conference, the National Press Photographers' Contest and the South Asian Journalist Association. She was named a Chips Quinn Scholar in 2007 and was a graduate teaching assistant at Ohio University.

 

 

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Found | Archives of National Geographic

Found | Archives of National Geographic | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.

We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location.

This is just the beginning of a great adventure. We will be adding new voices, stories, and artifacts as we go. We look forward to sharing this experience with everyone, and hope you make FOUND your home for inspiration and wonder.”

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I used to be you | Photographer: Kyoko Hamada

I used to be you | Photographer: Kyoko Hamada | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Kyoko Hamada’s Self Portraits Imagine What Her Life Will be Like in 30 Years

 

"When I first tried on her gray wig, the latex makeup, and her clothes, I gazed at the mirror for a long time. My initial reaction was to chuckle, but I started feeling a little uneasy soon after. The wrinkled face staring back at me resembled my own with thirty-plus years added to it. When I smiled, she smiled back at me. When I pouted, she pouted too."

"It was the first time I had met her, but she was simultaneously someone I already knew quite well and someone I knew nothing about. It has been a year and half since I started photographing Kikuchiyo-san and I have gotten used to dressing up as her. However, when I think of what could happen if we ran into each other in a crowded train station or during a walk in the park, I get uneasy imagining her say, “I used to be you.”—Kyoko Hamada

Photo report's insight:

Brooklyn-based photographer Kyoko Hamada steps out of her comfort zone in her latest series I Used to be You. Her work often consists of ordinary people and objects that she stages into quiet moments that explore various metaphors, but this time around Hamada turns the camera on herself to capture Kikuchiyo-san, the future version of herself. The series was born after Hamada spent time volunteering as a visitor to various seniors in NYC. When she discovered that none of the seniors she was working with were interested in being photographed, she decided to experiment on herself. The project turned into an exploration of aging, memory, and the different phases of life.

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The evasion studie | Fine art photographer: Stevens Brahms

The evasion studie | Fine art photographer: Stevens Brahms | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

These images were taken by American photographer Steven Brahms, for his project titled “The Evasion Studies”. Simply put they are dramatic run-for-your-life style portraits in rather unfavourable everyday places. A very simple idea and beautifully executed. In recent news Steven was one of the 2012 recipients of the Aaron Siskind Foundation — Individual Photographer’s Fellowship. Check out his work, it’s all gold.

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Ulu Pamir | Photographer: Miguel Ángel Sánchez

Ulu Pamir | Photographer: Miguel Ángel Sánchez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Miguel Ángel Sánchez traveled in 2012 with his studio to Ulu Pamir, Turkey, a far place in the middle of Turkish Kurdistan, hidden between mountains with very hard winters and connected by a tortuous path to Van Lake. 30 years ago, this land was the witness of the arrival of a group of unusual people with unusual features.

These people, originally from Kyrgyzstan, came walking from far away, from Pamir, with the promise of a better and safer life hosted by the Turkish government, avoiding the war with USSR.

30 years later, people from this place fight against the government´s abandonment and harassment of the PKK guerrilla warfare.

Miguel Ángel portrayed the inhabitants from this small village and their will to preserve their roots and traditions despite being far away from their original land.

Photo report's insight:

Miguel Ángel Sánchez (Madrid 1977), Spanish photographer based in Cairo since 2009.

For years he combined his development as an artist with his work in a commercial photography studio, until, in 2009, he decided to completely turn over to his creative side and opened his own photography studio in Cairo (Egypt).

 

His studio in Cairo is the base where he works and prepares projects developed in Egypt for the last four years, but he is also a study itinerant photographer who takes his workspace to any corner of the world: Asia, Middle East or black Africa. The Gaddafi war in Libya, the Ulu Pamir besieged by the PKK in Turkish Kurdistan, the Gaza Strip after Israel bombing and Lebanon after Hariri are some of the ports reached by Studio Al Asbani.

 

Miguel Ángel Sánchez also combines his work as a studio photographer with photojournalist and cameraman in conflict zones where he covered the war in Libya, the Egyptian revolution and the Gaza Operation Pillar of defense, among others.

 

His work has been published by national media such as El País, and international as The New York Times, Le Monde, New Yorker, Photo Raw, La Lettre de la Photographie, etc.

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Benedyct Antifer's curator insight, May 14, 2013 3:39 AM

Juste fantastique

Photography Open Salon's curator insight, May 15, 2013 6:30 AM
Photo report's insight:

Miguel Ángel Sánchez (Madrid 1977), Spanish photographer based in Cairo since 2009.

For years he combined his development as an artist with his work in a commercial photography studio, until, in 2009, he decided to completely turn over to his creative side and opened his own photography studio in Cairo (Egypt).

 

His studio in Cairo is the base where he works and prepares projects developed in Egypt for the last four years, but he is also a study itinerant photographer who takes his workspace to any corner of the world: Asia, Middle East or black Africa. The Gaddafi war in Libya, the Ulu Pamir besieged by the PKK in Turkish Kurdistan, the Gaza Strip after Israel bombing and Lebanon after Hariri are some of the ports reached by Studio Al Asbani.

 

Miguel Ángel Sánchez also combines his work as a studio photographer with photojournalist and cameraman in conflict zones where he covered the war in Libya, the Egyptian revolution and the Gaza Operation Pillar of defense, among others.

 

His work has been published by national media such as El País, and international as The New York Times, Le Monde, New Yorker, Photo Raw, La Lettre de la Photographie, etc.


Thanks for the intro Photo report.

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Waiting for the Miracle | Photographer: Graham Miller

Waiting for the Miracle | Photographer: Graham Miller | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Graham Miller is an Australian photographer based in Fremantle whose work is included in international and national collections.

 

Austrailian-based photographer Graham Miller combines constructed portraits, documentary street portraits, landscapes and still lifes in a series named after the 1992 Leonard Cohen song, Waiting for the Miracle. Miller explores narratives created through the interplay of these images and the connections made between them. While this results in an open ended and ambiguous experience, the images seem to hold compelling stories within the fictional coastal town Miller has constructed. Miller echoes the words of photographer Robert Adams in his statement, speaking of the young protagonists that “cling precariously but tenaciously to a sense of possibility, hope, and resolve.”

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Red State | Photographer: Christopher Anderson

Red State | Photographer: Christopher Anderson | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Magnum is probably the most famous photo agency in the world. Even if you haven't heard of it, chances are you're familiar with its images, be they Robert Capa's coverage of the Spanish Civil War, Steve McCurry's Afghan Girl or Martin Parr's very British holiday-scapes. Unlike most agencies, Magnum's members are selected by the other photographers in the agency, which, given they're the greatest photo agency in the world, means that becoming a member is a pretty grueling process. As part of an ongoing partnership with Magnum, we will be profiling some of their photographers over the coming weeks.

First up is Christopher Anderson, who became a Magnum nominee in 2005 and was a full member by 2010. His early work on Haitian immigrants' illegal journey to America—during which he and they sank in the Caribbean Sea in a handmade wooden boat named Believe in God—won him the Robert Capa Gold Medal. And last year, we produced an episode of Picture Perfect about him.

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Child Witches | Photographer: Ilvy Njiokiktjien

Child Witches | Photographer: Ilvy Njiokiktjien | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The number of churches in the Democratic Republic of Congo is growing on a daily basis. Most of them are revival churches, led by Congolese men who acclaim being priests and prophets. In return for money, they perform exorcisms on 'bewitched' children, to heal them from evil spirits. - he number of churches in the Democratic Republic of Congo is growing on a daily basis. Most of them are revival churches, led by Congolese men who acclaim being priests and prophets. In return for money, they perform exorcisms on 'bewitched' children, to heal them from evil spirits."- Ilvy Njiokiktjien

 

Ilvy Njiokiktjien is an independent photographer and multimedia journalist based in the Netherlands. She has worked in many parts of the world, with a focus on Africa.

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A.A. Mangkling’s Ngaben | Documentary photographer: Tahnia Roberts.

A.A. Mangkling’s Ngaben | Documentary photographer: Tahnia Roberts. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Hindu-Balinese believe the body is impure, a temporary shell, having no significance at all, except as a container of the soul and its anchor to the earth. All thoughts at the time of death are concentrated upon the spirit and its passage to heaven. The body is just there to be disposed of, and, instead of grieving, the Balinese prefer to throw a great celebration, in the process hastening their dead friend’s soul to oneness with god." -Tahnia Roberts

 

Ngaben is the cremation ritual/ceremony performed in Bali to send the deceased to the next life. The bodies of the deceased are placed in elaborate sarcophagi, and cremated following rituals and ceremonies that are full of simultaneous solemn and joyous pomp. The Balinese believe that the deceased will either reincarnate or find final rest known as moksha, and that the bodies are temporary shells, considered impure.

Tahnia Roberts' Ngaben is a collection of photographs she made during the cremation of the late A.A. Mangkling, an elderly Balinese. 

Tahnia Roberts is a portrait and documentary photographer, originally from New Zealand, who is currently resident in SE Asia traveling extensively to experience authentic cultural activities of the region. 

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Beards of Evil | Photographer: Andreas Jakwerth

Beards of Evil | Photographer: Andreas Jakwerth | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The series ‘Beards of Evil’ combines the beard style of some of the more evil villains of mankinds history with contemprorary, urban fashion. For us, it was interesting to see how nicely some of these styles would work with today’s fashion even though you cannot wear a beard like these nowadays.

 

I shot this series for the Austrian magazine thegap, which focuses on urban culture and music. One of their friends who had been growing a beard for about seven years, decided to finally get rid of it, so we jumped in and realized the series with the help of stylist Magdalena Vukovic and hairdresser Thomas Pavlidis. The model, a non-professional, changed his expression to fit perfectly with the style of beard he was wearing.

 

In the end the series never got published in the magazine because one of the fashion labels didn’t like the historical person we chose for their clothing.—Andreas Jakwerth

Andreas Jakwerth is a Vienna based photographer specializing in Portraiture and Documentary work.

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Myanmar, Inle Lake | Photographer: Ruben Vicente

Myanmar, Inle Lake  | Photographer: Ruben Vicente | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Ruben Vicente has just published an excellent ebook titled Myanmar: A Journey Through Time of his photographs, along with cogent and well written travel photography advice for this wonderful country, just emerging from a state of military dictatorship. I know there's a rush of travelers and photographers to Myanamr (Burma)...so do yourself a real favor, buy Ruben's ebook and drop Lonely Planet and the like.

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Ruben Vicente's comment, August 8, 2012 3:40 AM
Thank you for the shout-out =)
Photo report's comment, August 8, 2012 7:43 AM
@Ruben Vicente : you are welcome Rubens, your work is really amazing. The people have to see your travel photographs. :)
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Theyyam performers | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy

Theyyam performers  | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I've added a couple of galleries to my recently published website:www.telsawy.com. One of the galleries groups photographs of The Sufis, while the other has a grouping of Theyyam performers.

Red is the color of fire and blood, and associated with energy, war, danger, strength, power, determination as well as passion, courage, desire, and love. And it's used in many religious rituals and festivals in India, and worn by religious practitioners such as the Theyyam of Northern Malabar and theVellichapads (or Oracles) of Kodunggallur.

Theyyam is a living cult with several thousand-year-old traditions, rituals and customs, it includes many of the castes and classes of the Hindu religion in the Malabar region. The word Theyyam is a corrupt form of Devam or God. People of the region consider Theyyam itself as a god and seek blessings from them. 


As for the Oracles of Kodungallur, they celebrate both Kali and Shiva at an intense festival that lasts about a week.In their thousands, these red-clad devotees perform self mortification acts by banging on their heads with ceremonial swords repeatedly until blood trickle down their foreheads, and daub the wounds with turmeric. A photo essay titled Agony & Ecstasydocuments the Oracles religious event. 

And yes, I do like the color red." (Tewfic El-Sawy)

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The Revolution's Second Act | Photographer: Timothy Fadek

The Revolution's Second Act | Photographer: Timothy Fadek | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Egypt's Second Revolution - The revolution that began on Jan. 25 and seemed to culminate with the Feb. 11 fall of President Hosni Mubarak had begun all over again, with Egyptians rebelling on the streets of Cairo against military rule, putting the promise of the Arab Spring at risk. Young Egyptians battled security forces in and around Cairo's Tahrir Square, throwing rocks and firebombs and police and soldiers responded with tear gas, rubber bullets, live ammunition and beatings. More than 30 were killed and over a thousand injured.

Photo report's insight:

Timothy Fadek is an american photographer whose assignment work has been published in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, Le Monde...

 

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Angola | Photojournalist: Ami Vitale

Angola  | Photojournalist: Ami Vitale | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"From 1975 to 2002, war was a part of daily life for the people living in the rich African country of Angola. The beaten orange paths that zigzagged across the territory represented the displacement of more than twenty-percent of the population who had to leave their villages for government-controlled towns. Much of the population was unable to feed themselves while those that lived from the rich oil resources experienced a very different life. They were two worlds living uneasily side by side."- Ami Vitale

Photo report's insight:

ased in Montana, Vitale is a contract photographer with National Geographic magazine and is writing a book about the stories behind the images. She frequently gives workshops throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. Ami Vitale is judge of the show HTC Mission Covershot on National Geographic channel alon with Nagesh Kukunoor.

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Castro's People | Photojournalist: Susi Eggenberger (ZUMA PRESS)

Castro's People | Photojournalist: Susi Eggenberger (ZUMA PRESS) | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Ninety miles from America and roughly the size of Pennsylvania the totalitarian communist state of Cuba is home to more than eleven million people.  A multiracial society with a population of mainly Spanish origins and Catholic faith, Cuba boasts one of the best health care systems in the world with the average life expectancy comparable to the UK while it's average monthly salary is only $20.00.  Prolonged austerity and the state controlled economy's insufficiency in providing adequate services and goods have forced an estimated 40% of Cubans to turn to the black market in order to obtain necessary clothing, food and household items.  Historically, Cuban law subordinates it's people from freedom of movement, speech, assembly and the press.  However, efforts by the government for economic and social reform have recently loosened some of the constraints on travel, real estate and business creating a mixture of excitement and trepidation in the Cuban people." - Susi Eggenberger

Photo report's insight:

 

Susi Eggenberger is an independent documentary photographer based in Southern Maine and is available for assignment.

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Catalasians | Photographer: Mikel Aristregi

Catalasians | Photographer: Mikel Aristregi | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The Asian presence in Catalonia goes back to the last third of the 19thcentury when a small group of Filipinos lived in Barcelona.  Apart from a few isolated incidents, the Asian presence was not really visible to the general society until the second half of the 90s when, on par with the global trend of foreign immigrants, their number increased significantly.  F

 

rom the end of 1996 until June 2004, for example, the Asian population in Catalonia increased threefold.  However, if you count those actually coming from Asia there are only 99.454 people out of a total of 1.097.966 immigrants living in Catalonia, almost 10 per cent of the whole (IDESCAT, 2008). Even with these figures, it is not easy to determine the exact number of immigrants in Catalonia as the statistics published by the official sources do not take into account the anomalous situation of many immigrants.

 

The Chinese, the Pakistani, the Indian and the Philippine (in this order) are the most numerous communities and those that have significant establishments.- Mikel Aristregi

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SENS INTERDITS | Photographer: Wassim Ghozlani

SENS INTERDITS | Photographer: Wassim Ghozlani | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The work of Wassim Ghozlani takes the form of round images 40cm in diameter, the size of a Do Not Enter sign, which he imitates in his photographs by dressing women in red burqas and barring their eyes with a white headband, evoking their loss of sight and limited access to knowledge. This virulent series is matched by the work of eight women artists questioning their status, Patricia Triki and Héla Ammar at the White Box, as well as Amel Ben Attia, Nicène Kossentini and Mouna Jemal Siala at the Fiaf gallery.

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Divided soul | Photographer: David Alan Harvey

Divided soul | Photographer: David Alan Harvey | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
David Alan Harvey is a Magnum Photographer based in New York City. He has published three major books, Cuba, Divided Soul and Living Proof. He is publisher and editor of BURN Magazine.

 

"I have two aspects to my work. One is that I'm a magazine photographer, by trade, by profession, by career. In that sense, I'm trying to communicate things to viewers—readers of a magazine, but namely National Geographic, because they probably are not going to go to these places. So there's a basic desire just to communicate on a basic level. Then there's another side, where I'm trying to communicate on a more subliminal level with the subtleties of light, moment, and emotional experience."- Alan Harvey

Photo report's insight:

For much of his career, David Alan Harvey, a National Geographic staff photographer from 1978 to 1986, has trained his lens on the Hispanic world. He's traveled and photographed extensively in Spain, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, and nearly every other country in the Latin American Diaspora. Various assignments have also brought Harvey to Southeast Asia, Germany, France, and Italy, among other places. His work has appeared in a wide array of publications, including National Geographic, National Geographic Traveler, Life, The New York Times, and Sports Illustrated.

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De l'or dans les égouts | Photographes: Bruno Valentin & Julien Pannetier (ZEPPELIN)

De l'or dans les égouts |  Photographes: Bruno Valentin & Julien Pannetier (ZEPPELIN) | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Les égouts ne sont pas réputés pour leur convivialité, mais en Asie du Sud, leur contenu est une invitation aux plus dégourdis. Personne ne prête attention à cette poignée d'hommes crottés de la tête aux pieds, mais c'est pourtant de l'or qu'ils cherchent. De la poussière d'or que des joailliers trop pressés évacuent avec leurs eaux usées. Pas de quoi ameuter les foules, mais suffisamment pour faire vivre quelques familles bengalies. Tous les matins, ils profitent que les rues soient désertes pour faire vomir les canalisations. Ils écument méticuleusement les boues avant d'en extraire l'or à l'abri des regards indiscrets. 


Dhaka s'est endormie, ventre à l'air. La grande malade de l'Asie du Sud a péniblement trouvé le sommeil. Tous ses enfants l'ont rejoint, mais cette nuit, il fait si chaud que les sans abris sont encore les mieux lotis. Recroquevillés sous les jupons de la ville-mère, ils profitent des deux heures d'accalmie qui précèdent l'appel à la prière pour s'enfoncer dans un coin de trottoir moelleux. Dhaka transpire et pour cette nuit sans électricité, mieux vaut être dehors sous la caresse d'une brise moite que dans une chambre aveugle sous un ventilateur inanimé. " - ©ZEPPELIN


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Passenger Side Window | Photographer: Johnny Tergo

Passenger Side Window | Photographer: Johnny Tergo | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Out of all the clever photo hacks we’ve seen, this one may be the most creative. Johnny Tergo, a Los Angeles photographer, has built an over-the-top camera and lighting setup in his Chevy Silverado that he uses to take studio-quality portraits of pedestrians.

The photos document moments that can’t be shot any other way. Try lugging studio lights down the street and capturing the same scenes. Tergo, 35, says he commutes a lot as a freelancer he wanted to exploit his time behind the wheel.

 

“What I’ve tried to do is bring the studio lighting aspect to everyday real life on the streets,” he says.

Inside the truck on the passenger side, Tergo bolted a platform that holds a Canon 1D Mark IV with a 16-35 mm lens, a computer, an iPad mini and a studio light. Outside near the tailgate he’s attached a second studio light and reflector to a boom that extends 10 feet above the ground. Two gas generators in the bed of the truck pump out 4,000 watts for the lights, including a third that’s rigged under the bumper (photos of his setup are included at the end of the gallery).

As Tergo drives in neighborhoods with high foot traffic, he sets his exposure using an app called Capture Pilot on the iPad mini. He also adjusts the strobes for the ambient light using the strobe controls positioned in the cab. When he spots a subject, he drives around the block while he frames up the shot.

He’s learned a few tricks to get the best results. He leads moving subjects by pulling forward slightly, waiting for them to enter the frame. He’s also not above honking the horn and pretending to be angry with another driver to get people to look toward the camera.

 

The whole apparatus is triggered with a PocketWizard. Images are sent to Tergo’s dash-mounted iPhone via on-board wifi so he can review them. If he likes the photo he moves on. If not he tries to get another frame off before the subject figures out what’s going on. He says on a normal day he takes between 40 and 50 pictures with about five that are actually usable.

Some people are not so stoked to get their photo taken without consent. Tergo says there’s been a lot of yelling.

“A lot of people think I’m up to something nefarious,” he says. “But there have also been a couple times where someone has been really cool and I’ve pulled over and explained what I was doing.”

Tergo wants to add a second truck and more lights to the mix. Ideally, he’d have the extra truck pull up somewhere off to the side or behind the subject so it could uses it’s flashes as a rim light, which would help define the body of the person in the frame.

“I enjoy the rigging as much as the image making and anything that I find that will take it to the next level, I add it,” he says. “I don’t want to stop with good enough, I want it to be awesome.”

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Artscape | Al Jazeera English Channel

Artscape | Al Jazeera English Channel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Announced last week, Al Jazeera English has now premiered its new 6-episode series on Artscape, titled The New African Photography, which documents changes across the continent through the eyes of its photographers, in an effort to "take back control" of images of Africa with more nuanced, varied depictions of the continent, instead of the extremes we often get. Expect nods to pioneers like Malick Sidibé and autodidact Seydou Keïta.  The first of six episodes (one of which was executive produced by Viva Riva director Djo Munga) premiered onApril 22, and is available to watch online. Titled Invisible Borders, I've embedded it below for you to check out. It's 25 minutes long.

Photo report's insight:

The New African Photography is a documentary series which profiles six African artists determined to take back control of how their continent is portrayed. This six-part series showcases how a new generation of African photographers are keen to celebrate what is unique about the region, while remaining unflinching about the real problems facing their countries. Ultimately, it shows their optimism about Africa's future.

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Yemen: A fine balance | Photojournalist: Alex Potter

Yemen: A fine balance | Photojournalist: Alex Potter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Yemen is entering a transition period. After a year of bloody protests, a new President reigns and is faced with restructuring and rebuilding the broken country. Yemen is faced with internal conflict, Al Qaeda, a looming famine, and water shortage in addition to rooting out the corruption planted by the former regime. Yet with this work-in-progress I hope to show that the driving force in Yemen is in the beating heart of its people, in the undeniable hope of freedom.—Alex Potter

Alex Potter is an emerging photojournalist who has worked primarily in Minneapolis, MN and Yemen. After graduating university with a nursing degree she decided to follow her calling rather than the advice of others and turned to a life in photography.

She has been selected as a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar, shortlisted by the Lucie Foundation Emerging Photographer scholarship, and has been published by Reuters, JO Magazine, Boreal Collective, and a variety of small Midwest features. She is currently in Minneapolis finishing a long term project and hopes to return to Yemen in August.

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Brides of Xtabay | Fashion photographer: Holly Andres

Brides of Xtabay | Fashion photographer: Holly Andres | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

MAYPOLE BRIDES, commissioned by Xtabay Vintage Clothing Boutique as a conceptual fashion shoot depicting young brides preparing for the Maypole ceremony. The Maypole Dance originated as an ancient pagan fertility ceremony associated with the end of winter and the rebirth of the land. The pole itself is suggestive of the phallus.

Shot on location at Sauvie Island, near Portland Oregon.
Photography and concept by Holly Andres
Wardrobe and styling by Liz Gross/Xtabay
Hair and Makeup by Terri Lodge
Flowers provided by Fieldwork
Models: Krystal South, Jennafer Furniss, Kate Rocker, Nicole Marie Milchak, Lisa DeClercque, Pearl Essence, Kara Jean Caldwell, Rachel and Doni the goat.

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Running | Photographer: Tabitha Soren

Running | Photographer: Tabitha Soren | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Tabitha Soren began her series called Running with a chance discovery after photographing her daughter by the headlights of a car, in the act of running. Upon seeing the images, Soren had the sense she was trapping her daughter inside the frame. “I started thinking about panic, resilience, and the role of accident in life,” she says. “Also, when people are running their bodies contort and we get to glimpse emotions that are normally kept hidden.”

 

Soren’s Running series, along with the work by five other photographers (Martin Bogren, Barbara Ciurej & Lindsay Lochman, Monika Merva, and Shawn Rocco) is included in Fresh, the annual summer exhibition at Klompching Gallery. The artists were selected by Darren Ching (owner of the Klompching Gallery) and distinguished collector, Fred Bidwell (Bidwell Projects), for their consistency of vision, originality, craftsmanship and strong viewpoint. In addition to the gallery show, which opens tomorrow night, the artists’ works will be published in Blink magazine, and showcased online by Flak Photo.

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