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PURE | Photographer: HUANG JUNYUAN

PURE | Photographer: HUANG JUNYUAN | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Guangzhou based fashion photographer Huang Junyuan brings us a very mysterious and solemn series called “Pure”. Although the red and white sets of images are both mysterious and solemn, they each convey a very different tone and mood.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 23, 2015 9:58 PM

UNA SERIE DE FOTOGRAFÍAS LLAMADA "PURE" DONDE EL ROJO Y EL BLANCO DE LAS IMÁGENES SON A LA VEZ  MISTERIOSAS Y SOLEMNES CADA UNO DE ELLOS TRANSMITEN UN TONO Y EL ESTADO DE ÁNIMO MUY DIFERENTE.

Guangzhou fotógrafo de moda basada Huang Yuan

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Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Chances are you already know Steve McCurry as the man who took one of the most iconic photos of our time. It was of a 12-year-old Afghan refugee girl who’s piercing green eyes told us her harrowing story. The image itself was named “the most recognized photograph” in the history of the National Geographic magazine and her face became famous as the cover photograph on their June 1985 issue. Beyond just that one photo, McCurry has shot over a million images spanning 35 years. More than anything, he is one of a few that has that amazing ability to capture stories of our shared human experience. As he says,


“Most of my images are grounded in people. I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey what it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape that you could call the human condition.”


"Looking through his large body of work, we get to experience fantastic faraway places we can only dream about visiting. It’s in his incredible photos that we feel connected to the world at large, appreciating our similarities and our differences, our cultures and our histories, and our past and our present in a truly unique and inspiring way."

 

"To develop this project, the first thing I did was simply to observe the life of people in this part of the world. Through photogenic documentation, I wanted to tell what I had seen, how the farmers grow and harvest the coffee, and their lifestyle. I tried to show their daily habits, I entered their homes and went to the plantations, I wandered through the villages and let the images scroll in front of my eyes, to tell of the faces, the stories and the atmosphere." - Steve McCurry

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Claudia Fano's curator insight, February 5, 2015 3:17 PM

This imagination is rare i wish i could think outside the box like this painting.

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Bonnie, a life in prostitution | Photojournalist: Marie Hald

Bonnie, a life in prostitution | Photojournalist: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
39-year old Bonnie is a danish mother of three. Since the age of 18, she has been working as a prostitute. Her first time having sex for money was at a visit at a brothel in a small town. Bonnie and her friend were in need of money and tried it out.

 

The experience was unpleasant and Bonnie was shy and ashamed of her body. But because of the money, she kept working. Bonnie has a house In a small village in Sealand. Here she works everyday from 9-4. When her day is over she picks up her kids and goes home to her real house in another nearby village. Her oldest daughter Michella (16) has her own apartment and her son Oliver (14) lives at home. 6-year old Noa, Bonnies youngest son, thinks his mother has a job as a cleaning lady.

 

The older children know what her profession is, and so does their school, the community and so on. It is not easy for Oliver and Michella and Michella has been called names and asked how much her mother costs. That made her very upset. Bonnie pays taxes and is registered as a business. Although she is in trouble with the IRS and has been to prison more than once. The single most important thing in Bonnie's life is her children." - MARIE HALD

 

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Rana Plaza Collapse: Death of A Thousand Dreams | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter

Rana Plaza Collapse: Death of A Thousand Dreams | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On that day, early in the morning many garment workers walked into the factories of Rana Plaza, their working place. Within an hour everything was shattered. Nobody knows how many workers were running to save his or her lives at the end moment. Workers’ scream echoed on the walls of Rana Plaza. Many of their voices could not reach out passing through the heavy concrete walls. Over a thousand workers lost their lives in the deathtrap. They are the cheapest labors of the world. They are not only numbers; they are human beings.

 

Who could imagine the collapse that caused the most unacceptable fate for the cheapest labors from Bangladesh? 24th April 2013, 9am. Becoming a brutal incident of history, a nine-story commercial building Rana Plaza collapsed at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh and left more than 1134 workers dead, more than hundred missing and many other wounded. Around a thousand families have found dead bodies of their beloved family members. - Taslima Akhter

Photo report's insight:

About photo of two victims amid the rubble of the garment factory collapse, Taslima Akhter was selected for the 3rd prize singles of the World Press Photo of the Year 2013

TECHNICAL INFORMATIONSHUTTER SPEED: 1/40ISO: 1600F-STOP: 2.5FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mmCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II


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Portrait d’entreprise : se montrer sous son meilleur jour | Photographe : Serge Bouvet

Portrait d’entreprise : se montrer sous son meilleur jour |  Photographe : Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Une bonne photo, c’est un bel emballage

Envisagez les bénéfices d’un portrait d’entreprise comme on envisagerait ceux d’un emballage

Avec le boom des réseaux sociaux en ligne, il devient presque impératif d’avoir un profil complété à 100 % et d’afficher un rendu professionnel de votre image et par conséquent de votre société. La photo est devenue incontournable. J’en vois au fond de la salle qui soulève le sujet de la discrimination. Les faits sont les faits : l’image sera toujours prédominante dans un flot de texte.

Ainsi quand un prospect avise un profil en ligne, sur internet, sur les réseaux sociaux tel que Viadeo ou LinkedIn, la première chose qui attire ses yeux sont indéniablement la photo du sujet.

 

Peut-on encore négliger la force de frappe d’une photographie corporate ? Non, bien sûr que non. Envisagez les bénéfices d’un portrait d’entreprise comme on envisagerait ceux d’un emballage : L’emballage est toujours la première vision que l’on a d’un produit.

 

L’emballage est porteur de sens, riche en connotation, véhicule une valeur. Le portrait d’entreprise va dans le même sens en stimulant l’attraction pour le sujet photographié, il capte l’attention avec efficacité et, pour rester dans l’évocation de l’emballage produit, devient moteur de la vente. La photo devient un outil indispensable de séduction pour dynamiser l’intérêt de ceux qui se penchent sur votre profil. Ceci est valable pour n’importe quel autre support média : presse, TV, etc. (...) - Serge Bouvet

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Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.

Photo report's insight:

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 13, 2014 5:09 AM

Police corruption in india

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Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez

Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Violence and death are always present and tangible in Guatemala. The population seems to accept it as normal, even more so when women are the victims. In many cases, society simply ignores it, sits in silence or turns a blind eye.

 

Many men treat women as if they have no rights, thinking it unusual that someone should be punished or fined for beating, raping or killing them.

In Guatemala, violence against women generally starts behind the walls of their own homes. The aggressors in most cases are the men closest to them: fathers, brothers, cousins and partners.

 

There are now laws to protect women but there is little education, information or willingness to report crimes. The male perpetrators themselves often don’t seem to understand why they are being arrested. Prosecutors told me that they often hear from men accused of such crimes: “Why am I being arrested? I only hit my wife.” - Jorge Dan Lopez 



Photo report's insight:

"I was born in Guerrero State, in southern Mexico, a depressed region with large indigenous population. I began to take photos when I moved to Mexico City in the year 2000. After several courses in the capital I traveled to Italy in 2002 to live and photograph for diverse media until 2006. That year, one of great political and social change in Mexico, I returned to work for a financial newspaper and began with Reuters in 2008. I've been in Guatemala for Reuters since June of 2011." - Jorge Dan Lopez

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Dark Isolation, Tokyo | Photographer: Salvi Danes

Dark Isolation, Tokyo | Photographer: Salvi Danes | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

There is an undeniable nucleus of initial interest, a question that from the occidental perspective is easy to think about. How does a society really live, each of its members, in a human and social organization which is apparently exemplary and with an enviable lifestyle? There is a feeling that despite enjoying all the comforts of a modern society, the inhabitants of Tokyo are far away from what was, conventionally, understood as an ideal of happiness.

It is easy to find oneself isolated and alone among a crowd. Enjoying the comfort and economic safety is not a synonym of complete personal realization. A frenetic pace of life can ruin any personal initiative and any possibility of creative life.

From this clash, I could observe a dislocation of the people of this huge metropolis, as if they did not strike a balance between feeling isolated and alone among the crowd.

To sum up, the paradox was solved in a manifestation of solitude, in a great distress, in a sensation of individual frustration. Was that possible to detect and turn it into images? A difficulty due to the fact that I had to face up a perception of a completely subjective and debatable reality. It is not easy to show the breathlessness of the Taboo, the passive attitude or the nightmare of routine.—Salvi Danes

Photo report's insight:

Salvi Danes is a Spanish photographer based in Barcelona, Spain. His work has been honored by the Lucie Foundation, Sony World Photography, IPA, and many others. This work is from his series, Dark Isolation: Tokyo.

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Les Visages des Puces | Photographer: Andrew Kovalev

Les Visages des Puces | Photographer: Andrew Kovalev | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen, located in the suburbs of Paris, is the biggest and one of the oldest flea markets in the world. It is said, that the expression “flea market” itself originates from here. It is a conglomerate of 14 smaller markets, each with its own features and speciality. It is a part of the cultural and historical heritage of France and a place of great touristic interest. Most importantly, it is a sophisticated social organism, a vast community of people who are passionate about their very special craft.

 

The goal of this project is to document the look and the spirit of the place in showing its face and soul. To show incredible diversity of its parts, which are merging together in one entity, while remaining the separate worlds.

 

This series portrays the people of The Market. Those, who live and work there, who actually create, preserve and change the place throughout its years and decades.



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In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY

In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
After 150 years of broken promises, the Oglala Lakota people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota are nurturing their tribal customs, language, and beliefs. A rare, intimate portrait shows their resilience in the face of hardship. 

Almost every historical atrocity has a geographically symbolic core, a place whose name conjures up the trauma of a whole people: Auschwitz, Robben Island, Nanjing. For the Oglala Lakota of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that place is a site near Wounded Knee Creek, 16 miles northeast of the town of Pine Ridge. From a distance the hill is unremarkable, another picturesque tree-spotted mound in the creased prairie. But here at the mass grave of all those who were killed on a winter morning more than a century ago, it’s easy to believe that certain energies—acts of tremendous violence and of transcendent love—hang in the air forever and possess a forever half-life.

 

Alex White Plume, a 60-year-old Oglala Lakota activist, lives with his family and extended family on a 2,000-acre ranch near Wounded Knee Creek. White Plume’s land is lovely beyond any singing, rolling out from sage-covered knolls to creeks bruised with late summer lushness. From certain aspects, you can see the Badlands, all sun-bleached spires and scoured pinnacles. And looking another way, you can see the horizon-crowning darkness of the Black Hills of South Dakota.

 

One hot and humid day in early August, I drove out to interview White Plume in a screened outdoor kitchen he had just built for his wife. Hemp plants sprouted thickly all over their garden. “Go ahead and smoke as much as you like,” White Plume offered. “I always tell people that: Smoke as much as you want, but you won’t get very high.” The plants are remnants from a plantation of industrial hemp—low-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) Cannabis sativa—cultivated by the White Plume family in 2000.

Fuller text: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/08/pine-ridge/fuller-text ;
Photo report's insight:

Aaron Huey is a National Geographic photographer and a Contributing Editor for Harper's Magazine. He is based in Seattle, WA.

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“Gaia,The Birth Of An End” | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell

“Gaia,The Birth Of An End” | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Tonight it’s dark in the studio, and I’m curled up in my chair staring at this blank page, about to write the first Wonderland diary entry in 9 long months.. Outside its raining, and this morning brought the first frost I have noticed since last winter. Earlier, as I walked to work I stopped and watched a flutter of yellow leaves circle my boots, reminding me fondly of the cloak I made for ‘The Journey Home’ almost one year ago to the day. These fragments of seasons have become like old friends I find myself silently greeting, one by one as they return unannounced, blown by the autumn wind.


The landscape is changing in colour and I’m hoping for snow, as there is still one last picture I need to create before I can let the story complete. But for now, after months of work I am finally ready to let this last chapter unfold, of what has since become the last 4.5 years of my life.  I still can’t imagine the day I write the words ‘The End’ but it is slowly becoming a palpable reality, which leaves a bitter sweet emotion in my gut. The pictures I have created over the last few months have at times pushed me to my limit, and I know I have learnt so much about myself in the process.


I have had days when I have never felt to so happy to be alive, standing in the woods with my camera, so grateful for every precious moment ….. and others where my own crushing lack of self confidence has made me sick with worry, as to whether or not I have created something good enough. It is always the same with me …. all or nothing, the highest highs and lowest lows, but throughout it all I can say I have tried my hardest. I faced challenges I was genuinely scared of, but forced myself through as they were the only way to produce the ending I always dreamt of. So I just wanted to say how thankful I am to the people who have been on this journey with me and taken Wonderland into their hearts, both the followers of the project and the irreplaceable tiny team I work so closely with."- Kirsty Mitchell 

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Martin Lea's curator insight, November 25, 2013 6:52 AM

More digital imaging than photography but really creative and beautiful.........

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LAST BEST HIDING PLACE | Photographer: Tim Richmond

LAST BEST HIDING PLACE | Photographer: Tim Richmond | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Tim Richmond‘s American West – depicted in Last Best Hiding Place – can be placed anywhere onto the continuum that has the myth at one end and the artist’s unique vision at the other end. It’s a place filled with characters and locations that manage to be specific and completely generic at the same time, with a rough, somewhat hurt, tenderness underneath. I can’t help but think that the photographer is very much aware of what he is taking pictures of, given there appears to be a balancing act at play: Every stereotype is depicted, to be subverted right away or elsewhere. There are cowboys, sure, but they have baby faces underneath their stubble.


Richmond’s West ends up throwing stereotypes and preconceived ideas back at us, reminding us that what we’d like to think of as real is really of our own choosing. What we find is what we’re looking for. Here, photography comes full circle, because it is always at least that: A quest for that, which we already know. And as long as we’re not deluding ourselves into thinking there’s more, we’re in good shape.

 

I’ve written many times that photography really only excels when it’s being done with its own limitations in mind. These limitations arise from the technical nature of the medium in more ways than one. The properties of the camera have as much to do with it as the fact that a photographer is pointing the camera into some direction, at something in the world.

 

A long time ago, photographers were able to point their cameras at the world, a world not weighed down by preconceived ideas and earlier photographs. Now, when you point your camera at the world, you’re really pointing it more at all those images in our minds than at the world itself.

The secret then is to make this work, to produce photographs that can still stand on their own, while acknowledging all the ones that came before them. Tim Richmond‘sLast Best Hiding Place does just that, and it does it well.

All photographs © and kindly provided by Tim Richmond 


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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, October 9, 2013 3:39 PM

Depressing America...

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The Magical Streets Of Raghu Rai's India | Photographer: Raghu Rai

The Magical Streets Of Raghu Rai's India | Photographer: Raghu Rai | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

When I go to a situation, I see something interesting, and I see the enormity and the size of it, and the complexity of it, and I say “Yes God, you’ve shown me this but it’s not enough for me.” So he says “Alright.” Then I keep walking, then he shows me something more complex and bigger. I say “Yes God, It’s nice. But it’s still not enough for me.” So I go on and on and I don’t accept it, and then he knows this child of his is very demanding and restless. And then he opens up and shows me something I have never experienced before. Then I take a picture and say “Thank you God.”


Indian Photographer Raghu Rai is one of those rare photographers who never left home, choosing to focus his lens decisively on his motherland since the early 1960′s, a decision that has seen him document the changing socialscape and history of India over 4 decades, from the Sadhus of Kumbh Mela to Mrs Gandhi and Mother Teresa to the victims of Bhopal.

 

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He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page

He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
He Led the CIA to bin Laden—and Unwittingly Fueled a Vaccine Backlash. Pakistani doctor's role in health campaign sparked local suspicions that efforts to fight polio were part of a Western plot.
Photo report's insight:

PESHAWAR, Pakistan—In his native Pakistan, Dr. Shakil Afridi is considered a traitor by many people for helping the Central Intelligence Agency track down and kill Osama bin Laden. In the United States, he is hailed as a hero.

 

In global health circles, his story is a cautionary tale about the consequences that can spiral out of control when health professionals get too close to intelligence operations.

More than three years after U.S. Navy SEALs raided bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, it remains unclear whether Afridi knew he was working for the CIA when he led a hepatitis B vaccination campaign that helped U.S. agents learn where bin Laden was hiding.

Afridi's wife and his current lawyer, Qamar Nadeem Afridi, who is the doctor's cousin, say that he didn't know of the CIA connection, and U.S. intelligence specialists say that even if he did know, Afridi almost certainly had no idea that the man whose location he helped to identify was the world's most wanted terrorist.

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The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe

The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For The Shepherd’s Realm: Volume III, photographer Andrew Fladeboe captures New Zealand’s courageous working dogs, tracing the historical threads that connect them to the verdant farms and steep hills of the country’s South Island.

 

Fladeboe has dedicated the last few years of his career to chronicling the millennia-long bond fostered between man and dog. Canines, he explains, have been by our side for more than 30,000 years, ensuring not only our prosperity but also our survival. In New Zealand in particular, herding dogs have been a crucial part of the cultural landscape since border collies emigrated from Scotland during the 19th century, and until fifty years ago, the sheep industry was New Zealand’s leading enterprise.

 

The artist explains that although working dogs are rarely petted or allowed inside, they do share a close friendship with the farmers who have trained them. Herding dogs are most often border collies of huntaways, a breed native to New Zealand, and they are bred and raised to be deeply in tune with the farmers. They can comprehend seven whistled commands and often can anticipate the wishes of the shepherd with whom they work side-by-side.

 

 

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Children of the Omo | Photographer: Steve Mc Curry

Children of the Omo | Photographer:  Steve Mc Curry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia. It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley, with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. "


" The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley live without clean drinking water and without medical care. It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued. " 

 

" Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer,  learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture. " - Steve McCurry

Photo report's insight:

More information: http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

agregar su visión ...

JackPreguiss's curator insight, March 12, 2015 4:42 PM

um trabalho , onde envolve sensibilidade , este fotografo STEVE MCCURRY, trabalha não só com sua câmera , mais com seus sentimentos e com o sentimento do sujeito fotografado , é maravilhoso, ele consegue registrar não só o físico ... como também a alma da pessoa.

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In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“My first inspirations were world-changers like James Nachtwey, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry. I firmly believe that photography has a role to play in provoking thought, spurring dialogue, and prompting action—therein being a potentially potent ingredient in an antidote to social evils.

“Photographs are informative, a record of what we do and value, and contribute important subjective testimonies for history.

 

That said, worldwide trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with over 700,000 women moved across international borders annually. It is not at all realistic to imagine photos making any substantial dent to improve this situation. The photos I take will do little to directly improve the lives of women and children in Sonagachi.

 

“To do this would take massive political, economic and legal overhauls, not to mention years of reshaping social values. This was one of my hardest realizations when following apparently humanistic callings. That images can, however, give people a voice and better inform a public debate, is some journalistic consolation. What makes it immediately worthwhile for me is the experience of earning an individual’s trust, and for a while, touching lives, sharing stories and learning from each other in a dignified, respectful, curious manner. This is the only honest thing I can convince people of offering them, and surprisingly it is also what seems to open the most doors for me.” - Souvid Datta

Photo report's insight:

Mumbai-born photographer Souvid Datta is a young man of 21 whose age puts him somewhere in between the subjects he’s been documenting in the infamous red-light district of Kolkata, India and the subjects’ children. His series, In the Shadows of Kolkata, portrays a close-knit group of female sex workers, a few of their clients, and their children. Exploring the lives of sex workers as a photographic “theme” never fails to affect, and seeing children interspersed into this work adds another layer of difficult material to digest, question, process

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1503 | Fine art photographer: CHRISTIAN TAGLIAVINI

1503 | Fine art photographer: CHRISTIAN TAGLIAVINI | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With his already legendary series »1503« Christian Tagliavini invites the viewer to a time travel to the 16th century. His protagonists bear names such as Cecilia, Lucrezia or Bartolomeo, they are gracile, graceful or mighty and all of them express the pride of the Renaissance. In the style of the Florentine Agnolo di Cosimo, in art history better known as Bronzino, Tagliavini gives the patina of Mannerism to his modern sitters. The title of the series »1503« is also a reference to Bronzino’s year of birth.

 

The artist does not only stages the image space or places the light. The accurate spadework of each portrait is an inalienable foundation for the accomplished work that attracts the recipient. From the casting over the design of the dresses through to the makeup, Tagliavini is the indicatory player in every single operating procedure. The universal artist creates a piece of art that is the result of this creative process – the traces of them meet up in the final work and culminate in something sublime.

 

By doing so, the artist perfectly succeeds in the challenge of citing art history without simply copying it. Finally, with a productive period of more than 13 months the series »1503« has become an impressive testament of the visionary creative richness of the avant-gardist Christian Tagliavini. 

Photo report's insight:

Born in 1971, Christian Tagliavini grew up in Italy and Switzerland. He had studied graphic design and worked as an architect and graphic artist before he focused on photography art in 2000. Additional fine arts such as architecture, graphic design or drawing have influenced his art until today. His biographic background also shaped his understanding of art to invent and construct works. His works cannot only be seen as images, they are complex pieces of art, which have their roots in different materials. Tagliavini’s creative work is mostly mirrored in series that tell stories, offer multifaceted quotes or which are the result of an unusual contemporary concept. His works have been exhibited in numerous exhibitions and art fairs worldwide. Christian Tagliavini, who was honoured with the Hasselblad Masters Award in 2012, lives and works in Switzerland today.

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Rob Vonmeulen's curator insight, January 8, 2014 8:08 AM

Back to 1500 .... 

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Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez

Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The clock on the wall marked four in the morning. It was a cold and wet Saturday in July, but I was sitting in the warm offices of El Salvador’s Red Cross. Suddenly, the relative calm and silence in the emergency unit was interrupted when the phone rang. The loud noise made me jump. The phone operator said: “What is your name? If you don’t identify yourself, we can’t help you.”

 

I went to the operator and asked him what was happening. He said that there had been a report of a woman who had been beaten, raped several times and then left for dead in a ditch. He said that they would take her to hospital because of the severity of her injuries and I asked to go along.

 

When I got to where she had been found, I saw a woman dressed in a baby blue dress that was dirty all over, with a face disfigured by the blows she had received. She was disoriented and her gaze seemed lost in a void. She kept on repeating that her name was Claudia (...) - Ulises Rodriguez

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La transfiguration du banal dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet

La transfiguration du banal dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dans le domaine du business, ne perdons pas de vue que la vente d’un magazine est surtout régie dans nos sociétés occidentales par un levier marketing singulier : l’idéal de beauté. Cela ne date pas d’hier. Je ne souscris pas totalement à cette analyse, mais force est de constater que dans le jeu de la séduction, l’artifice est roi. Dans le secteur du business, il coexiste deux cas d’écoles : l’une prône l’artifice dans la communication visuelle quand la seconde cultive la sobriété. A vous d’en estimer le potentiel selon la charte de la société pour laquelle vous travaillez.

 

"On est comme ça. Nous témoignons par nos aspirations naïves vers la majesté superlative des formes artificielles, d’une certaine répugnance à ce qui est trop réel.

Je considère les artifices comme l’indice d’une appétence pour l’idéal évoluant dans notre esprit au-dessus de tout ce que la vie naturelle y accumule de trop terre à terre, comme une déformation sublime de la nature.

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Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet

Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nothing better reflects the strangeness of a people than the environment in which he lives. So I decided to import a part of India in Europe, framed in a bus shelter or ad showcase to create an open-air museum. Sometimes it coexists funny interaction between the two dimensions. These photos are a poetry of Rajasthan." - Serge Bouvet

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LETTER FROM AFGHANISTAN | Photojournalist: AARON HUEY

LETTER FROM AFGHANISTAN | Photojournalist: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"In the main square in Tirin Kot, the capital of Uruzgan Province, in central Afghanistan, a large billboard shows a human skeleton being hanged. The rope is not a normal gallows rope but the stem of an opium poppy. Aside from this jarring image, Tirin Kot is a bucolic-seeming place, a market town of flat-topped adobe houses and little shops on a low bluff on the eastern shore of the Tirinrud River, in a long valley bounded by open desert and jagged, treeless mountains.

 

About ten thousand people live in the town. The men are bearded and wear traditional robes and tunics and cover their heads with turbans or sequinned skullcaps. There are virtually no women in sight, and when they do appear they wear all-concealing burkas. A few paved streets join at a traffic circle in the center of town, but within a few blocks they peter out to dirt tracks.

 

Almost everything around Tirin Kot is some shade of brown. The river is a khaki-colored wash of silt and snowmelt that flows out of the mountain range to the north, past mud-walled family compounds. On either side of the river, however, running down the valley, there is a narrow strip of wheat fields and poppy fields, and for several weeks in the spring the poppies bloom: lovely, open-petalled white, pink, red, and magenta blossoms, the darker colors indicating the ones with the most opium."


Full text of article: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/07/09/070709fa_fact_anderson

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Only Unity - | Photographer: Matt Lutton

Only Unity -  | Photographer: Matt Lutton | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Only Unity”: Serbia In The Aftermath of Yugoslavia has emerged from five years of living and working in the Balkans; it is my personal response to the confounding atmosphere of the region. My project presents a psychological portrait of Serbs from across the Balkans as they confront a radically changed landscape within physically contracting borders. Serbia is emerging from the hangover of the 1990s, where atrocities were carried out in their name just across newborn borders, and constructive reflection about the consequences of those years is over due.

 

I am photographing details of society that both reflect and undermine the popular Serbian creation myths. Many issues are rooted in the complicated phrase “Only Unity Saves the Serbs” which was popular in the narrative of mass political manipulation during the disintegration of Yugoslavia and the wars that took place in its vacuum. Serbia is still recovering from the post- traumatic stress of those years, leading to a national confusion about their identity and a productive path forward.

I have focused on diverse subjects within the Serbian landscape which are far removed from any reality espoused by politicians. Young men and women are being raised in a divided, uncertain atmosphere and I hope to capture that essence so that we can further consider the implications of a Balkan region that is led by this generation. It is impossible to analyze or understand any event in this region without first considering its historical roots. I am interested in exploring and understanding the parts of today’s Balkan society that the next generation will read about in their history textbooks. What is happening now in the streets and in political negotiations will have profound impact on regional stability in the future.

 

There are many elements that contribute to a hostile and sometimes desperate atmosphere in Serbia today. But there too are moments that show healing and a glimpse at a different future than many have seen for themselves in the last decade. The growing pains of this developing democracy must continue to be carefully documented and explored, as the battles of the 1990s have yet to be finally played out. I’ve experienced alarming apathy and lack of compassion from many youth across the Balkans, and I hope to confront them directly with a different picture of the countries and history they will inherit. I hope my pictures will help bridge local borders, real and imagined. - Matt Lutton

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Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz

Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Most people say that street photography features people photographed on the street in unposed situations. For me this definition is simply too broad as it includes portraiture, reportage and peopled cityscape, which might have nothing to do with the genre. For me this broad definition can be narrowed easily to define proper street photography by adding just one word – “a twist”. A little twist – something clever, funny, unexpected, surprising or ambiguous. Something making you scratch your head, something putting a smile on your face… And the photo does not have to be taken on the street – it can be shot indoors, on the beach or in the forest. What matters is that little “twist”.
 
What are the key elements of a good photo? In my opinion it is the content, composition and light. The content is most important for me. Sometimes a poorly composed and lit photograph still can be good, what matters is the message it conveys. The composition is the way elements are placed and related to each other in the frame. It greatly depends on the distance from the subject – usually the closer you get the more dynamic perspectives you can achieve that can make your compositions more interesting.

 

The light is what illuminates the scene and produces shadows and highglights in the image. It can be natural or artificial. It can be a direct sunlight (which can be soft or harsh depending on the time of the day), soft ambient light in the shade or flash produced by the flashgun on top of the camera. When these three elements come together nicely in one frame you most probably have a great photo."- Maciej Sakowicz

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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, October 23, 2013 11:53 AM

Another very good set of street photography

Martin Lea's curator insight, November 10, 2013 7:17 AM

that is it..........a moment or a thought or a caption ..............you just see it ior sense but of course you have to capture it !!

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Des yeux qui en disent long | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Des yeux qui en disent long | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Le paysan au turban vermeil était adossé à l’ombre d’un mur jaune œuf, dégustant sonmasala tea. Il était 12h30. Je demandais à mon chauffeur de s’arrêter. Les notes de bleus, jaunes rouge et ocre m’avait singulièrement captivé. Dans mon fors intérieur, j’entrevis la possibilité d’un portrait très vivant et lorsque je vis ces yeux brillants, je pensais qu’il y avait là, une histoire intérieur à saisir. Mais avant de l’importuner, pour commencer une conversation en douceur, j’ai commandé moi aussi un masala tea et j’ai profité de ce havre de paix lénifiant et silencieux où l’on converse par le regard.

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