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Transfiguration | Fine art photographer: Ben Hopper

Transfiguration | Fine art photographer: Ben Hopper | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

London-based photographer, filmmaker and artist Ben Hopper created the series 'Transfiguration' in collaboration with circus artists and dancers. Using paint and powder, photographing his subjects in almost bizarre positions, Hopper creates sculptural figures that appear more abstract than actually human.

He states: "Like a mask, the layers of body paint and powder disguise the identity and release something animalistic from within." You can see much more images of the series over on his Blog, where he is also selling some prints.

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Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco

Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Oleg Oprisco is a brilliantly talented photographer from Lviv, Ukraine, who creates stunning surreal images of elegant women in fairy-tale or dream-like settings. There’s one significant difference, however, that sets him apart from other artists who create similar work – Oprisco shoots using old-school film photography.

 

The fact that he shoots with film means that everything you see in these photos had to be created that way – it couldn’t be done digitally. “I’ve found it ideal to do everything myself. I come up with a concept, create the clothing, choose the location and direct the hair and makeup,” Oprisco explained in an interview with Bored Panda. “Before shooting, I plan the overall color scheme. According to the chosen palette, I select clothes, props, location, etc, making sure that all of it plays within a single color range.” He uses Kiev 6C and Kiev 88 cameras with medium-format film and a variety of lenses.

 

It’s clear that Oprisco is deeply passionate about his work. “Each of my photos is a scene from real life. That is the perfect source of inspiration for me as there is so much beauty to it.” Oprisco offered some inspiring advice for aspiring young photographers mixed in with some tough love as well. “Drop your job and shoot … if you feel that’s what you want,” he said. “Freedom, happiness, money… all will come after you let go and just shoot.”

 

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 13, 2014 11:52 PM

Oleg Oprisco es un fotógrafo brillante talento de Lviv, Ucrania, que crea impresionantes imágenes surrealistas de las mujeres elegantes de cuento de hadas o ajustes de ensueño. Hay una diferencia significativa, sin embargo, que lo diferencia de otros artistas que crean un trabajo similar - Oprisco dispara usando la vieja escuela de fotografía de la película. 

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Rana Plaza Collapse: Death of A Thousand Dreams | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter

Rana Plaza Collapse: Death of A Thousand Dreams | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On that day, early in the morning many garment workers walked into the factories of Rana Plaza, their working place. Within an hour everything was shattered. Nobody knows how many workers were running to save his or her lives at the end moment. Workers’ scream echoed on the walls of Rana Plaza. Many of their voices could not reach out passing through the heavy concrete walls. Over a thousand workers lost their lives in the deathtrap. They are the cheapest labors of the world. They are not only numbers; they are human beings.

 

Who could imagine the collapse that caused the most unacceptable fate for the cheapest labors from Bangladesh? 24th April 2013, 9am. Becoming a brutal incident of history, a nine-story commercial building Rana Plaza collapsed at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh and left more than 1134 workers dead, more than hundred missing and many other wounded. Around a thousand families have found dead bodies of their beloved family members. - Taslima Akhter

Photo report's insight:

About photo of two victims amid the rubble of the garment factory collapse, Taslima Akhter was selected for the 3rd prize singles of the World Press Photo of the Year 2013

TECHNICAL INFORMATIONSHUTTER SPEED: 1/40ISO: 1600F-STOP: 2.5FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mmCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II


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Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva

Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Once upon a time in Siberia, on the shores of the Arctic Ocean, in a warm bed in a small town, a little girl woke up from a dream. It was morning, but it was still dark out, for the little town was so far North that the sun would not show itself for many months. They called this the Polar Night.

The little girl rubbed the sleep from her eyes and dressed in the dark. She put on her pink jacket and red stocking cap and stepped outside. Her breath froze and she walked in the direction of school. All around her were endless fields of frozen tundra. But the fields were not white like you might think, for up above the Aurora Borealis lit up the sky. It looked like a big green breath frozen in the heavens and all around the little girl were beautiful colors. The snow was painted green. And on some mornings—if she was lucky—she’d even see bits of blue, yellow and pink on her walk to school.

She loved these colors very much. Walking through them made her imagination come alive. She liked to think of the fields as blank canvases for Mother Nature to paint upon. And what did that make her? Was she part of the painting too, in her pink jacket and red hat?

She smiled and her mind began dreaming of the days when the Polar Night would come to an end, when the first sun would light up the snowy mountains, making it look like blueberry ice cream. And then the summer would come, the snow would melt and the tundra would transform into planet Mars with it’s golden color seeming to stretch out forever in every direction.

She thought to herself, “Every season has its own colors.” She stored all these colors in her heart, and walked beneath the Aurora Borealis in this little town way up North.

The town was called Tiksi. - 

 

Photo report's insight:

Evgenia Arbugaeva is one of 50 photographers in the Critical Mass 2011 exhibition Contents: Love, Anxiety, Happiness & Everything Else atPhoto Center NW. This exhibition, juried by Darius Himes, will also travel to Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, and RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, furthering the mission of all four photography organizations to bring top emerging talent to the public.

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Sumedha and Sapan: a story of an Indian wedding | Photographer: Isabella De Maddalena

Sumedha and Sapan: a story of an Indian wedding | Photographer: Isabella De Maddalena | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Sumedha and Sapan is a present day story, but tied to tradition. 
Sumedha Sood, 30, is an Indian woman from New Delhi. Sapan Basnett, 29, is an Indian man born in Gangtok, the Indian state of Sikkim. Sumedha and Sapan graduated from the same school: the National Institute of Fashion Technology, in New Delhi.


This is where they met for the first time, through mutual friends. After completing his studies, Sapan moved to Bangalore to work as a fashion designer. In February of 2008, Sumedha moved to Milan to study for her Masters at the European Institute of Design. One evening in October 2010, surfing on facebook, Sumedha found Sapan through "People You May Know", and sent him a friend request.


Sapan accepted the invitation and they started a chat online. In the following days they were constantly chatting, and then they started talking on Skype. Shortly after, Sapan sent Sumedha an airline ticket from Delhi to Bangalore for her next trip to India. A few days after their meeting in Bangalore, Sapan was presented to Sumedha's family.
In January 2011, they celebrated their marriage. - Isabella De Maddalena

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Found | Archives of National Geographic

Found | Archives of National Geographic | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.

We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location.

This is just the beginning of a great adventure. We will be adding new voices, stories, and artifacts as we go. We look forward to sharing this experience with everyone, and hope you make FOUND your home for inspiration and wonder.”

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I used to be you | Photographer: Kyoko Hamada

I used to be you | Photographer: Kyoko Hamada | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Kyoko Hamada’s Self Portraits Imagine What Her Life Will be Like in 30 Years

 

"When I first tried on her gray wig, the latex makeup, and her clothes, I gazed at the mirror for a long time. My initial reaction was to chuckle, but I started feeling a little uneasy soon after. The wrinkled face staring back at me resembled my own with thirty-plus years added to it. When I smiled, she smiled back at me. When I pouted, she pouted too."

"It was the first time I had met her, but she was simultaneously someone I already knew quite well and someone I knew nothing about. It has been a year and half since I started photographing Kikuchiyo-san and I have gotten used to dressing up as her. However, when I think of what could happen if we ran into each other in a crowded train station or during a walk in the park, I get uneasy imagining her say, “I used to be you.”—Kyoko Hamada

Photo report's insight:

Brooklyn-based photographer Kyoko Hamada steps out of her comfort zone in her latest series I Used to be You. Her work often consists of ordinary people and objects that she stages into quiet moments that explore various metaphors, but this time around Hamada turns the camera on herself to capture Kikuchiyo-san, the future version of herself. The series was born after Hamada spent time volunteering as a visitor to various seniors in NYC. When she discovered that none of the seniors she was working with were interested in being photographed, she decided to experiment on herself. The project turned into an exploration of aging, memory, and the different phases of life.

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Passenger Side Window | Photographer: Johnny Tergo

Passenger Side Window | Photographer: Johnny Tergo | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Out of all the clever photo hacks we’ve seen, this one may be the most creative. Johnny Tergo, a Los Angeles photographer, has built an over-the-top camera and lighting setup in his Chevy Silverado that he uses to take studio-quality portraits of pedestrians.

The photos document moments that can’t be shot any other way. Try lugging studio lights down the street and capturing the same scenes. Tergo, 35, says he commutes a lot as a freelancer he wanted to exploit his time behind the wheel.

 

“What I’ve tried to do is bring the studio lighting aspect to everyday real life on the streets,” he says.

Inside the truck on the passenger side, Tergo bolted a platform that holds a Canon 1D Mark IV with a 16-35 mm lens, a computer, an iPad mini and a studio light. Outside near the tailgate he’s attached a second studio light and reflector to a boom that extends 10 feet above the ground. Two gas generators in the bed of the truck pump out 4,000 watts for the lights, including a third that’s rigged under the bumper (photos of his setup are included at the end of the gallery).

As Tergo drives in neighborhoods with high foot traffic, he sets his exposure using an app called Capture Pilot on the iPad mini. He also adjusts the strobes for the ambient light using the strobe controls positioned in the cab. When he spots a subject, he drives around the block while he frames up the shot.

He’s learned a few tricks to get the best results. He leads moving subjects by pulling forward slightly, waiting for them to enter the frame. He’s also not above honking the horn and pretending to be angry with another driver to get people to look toward the camera.

 

The whole apparatus is triggered with a PocketWizard. Images are sent to Tergo’s dash-mounted iPhone via on-board wifi so he can review them. If he likes the photo he moves on. If not he tries to get another frame off before the subject figures out what’s going on. He says on a normal day he takes between 40 and 50 pictures with about five that are actually usable.

Some people are not so stoked to get their photo taken without consent. Tergo says there’s been a lot of yelling.

“A lot of people think I’m up to something nefarious,” he says. “But there have also been a couple times where someone has been really cool and I’ve pulled over and explained what I was doing.”

Tergo wants to add a second truck and more lights to the mix. Ideally, he’d have the extra truck pull up somewhere off to the side or behind the subject so it could uses it’s flashes as a rim light, which would help define the body of the person in the frame.

“I enjoy the rigging as much as the image making and anything that I find that will take it to the next level, I add it,” he says. “I don’t want to stop with good enough, I want it to be awesome.”

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The Sound of Rain | Photographer: Christophe Jacrot

The Sound of Rain | Photographer: Christophe Jacrot | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

In my opinion, there are two ways of capturing the world for a photographer; on the one hand grasping its horror, and on the other sublimating it. I have chosen the second. More specifically, I like the way rain, snow and “bad weather” awaken a feeling of romantic fiction within me, mainly in the big cities. (climatic excesses are another topic).

I see these elements as a fabulous ground for photography, an under-used visual universe with a strong evocative power, and with a richness of subtle lights. This universe escapes most of us, since we are too occupied getting undercover. Man becomes a ghostly silhouette wandering and obeying the hazards of rain or of snow, into the eternity of the climate …
My approach is deliberately pictorial and emotional.-CHRISTOPHE JACROT

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bremont Alfredo's curator insight, March 8, 2013 6:38 AM

arts and means of creation

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National Geographic: The Last Roll of Kodachrome

In 2009, when Kodak announced that production of Kodachrome film would be coming to an end, legendary photographer Steve McCurry saw an opportunity, and asked if the company would give him the final roll. Given his reputation and the many famed photographs he’s taken on Kodachrome, it’s no surprise Kodak said yes.

As a tribute to this final roll, a crew from National Geographic decided to follow McCurry and document the momentous last 36 frames that would ever be shot on that film — the video above is the result.

The video is much more than just a chronicling of how McCurry spent that last roll of film. As with any great artist, when the NatGeo crew put McCurry on camera he inevitably managed to spout some phenomenal advice. It really makes you appreciate digital (or perhaps miss film) to see McCurry being so careful with his shots, making sure that each one did the Kodachrome roll justice.

In reality, the days already came and went when that roll was shot and developed; the last lab to process Kodachrome stopped at the end of 2010 and you can see the gallery of those final shots on McCurry’s website. But this documentary acts as yet another farewell to a film so loved there are plans for a movie about its demise.

Photo report's insight:

Steve McCurry Photographs with the Last Roll of Kodachrome Film

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Portraits | Steve McCurry

Portraits | Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

http://stevemccurry.com/galleries/portraits

"Most of us have seen Steve McCurry's National Geographic portrait of the Afghan girl pictured above. McCurry has the rare ability to capture extremely powerful images that stay branded in our minds, never to be forgotten.

The Philadelphia-born photographer has covered many areas of international and civil conflict, including the Iran-Iraq war, the disintegration of the former Yugoslavia, Beirut, Cambodia, the Philippines, the Gulf War, and continuing coverage of Afghanistan. He focuses on the human consequences of war, not only showing what war impresses on the landscape, but rather, on the human face.

McCurry is driven by an innate curiosity and sense of wonder about the world and everyone in it. He has an uncanny ability to cross boundaries of language and culture to capture stories of human experience. “Most of my images are grounded in people," he says. "I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey what it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape that you could call the human condition.”

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Steve McCurry goes to Brazil for Pirelli | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Steve McCurry goes to Brazil for Pirelli | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Having had a steady stream of fashion photographers shoot its calendar for the past decade or so, Pirelli has switched things up for next year’s edition by tapping Steve McCurry. A Robert Capa Gold Medal winner, the American photojournalist is best known for his 1985 National Geographic cover “Afghan Girl.” 

That credential was enough to win over Liya Kebede, one of the 11 models who posed for McCurry. Kebede said, “That made it really interesting because who doesn’t know the photograph of that Afghan girl?” 

The fact that she, Karlie Kloss, Adriana Lima and the other eight models featured in the 2013 “Cal,” as it is called, are each involved with a humanitarian project or nongovernmental organization made for a winning combination. 

The whole arrangement was not a stretch for McCurry, a Philadelphia-born, Pennsylvania State University graduate, who said, “Much of what I have done in my career is portraiture, and I have done various things in fashion, including a few shows in Milan...”

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Silent Dialog 2012 | Fine art photographer: Viktoria Sorochinski

Silent Dialog 2012 | Fine art photographer: Viktoria Sorochinski | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“Silent Dialog” is my most recent ongoing project that I have started to work on in 2011. It talks about the complex and psychologically charged mother-son relationships, depicting several families from various generations. This project dwells in between documentary and fiction, where all the subject are real people in real relationships, but the scenes are moderately orchestrated in order to bring out the essence of their particular bond. This work is based on my personal observations and my previous projects on familial bonds, as well as on works of psychoanalysts /philosophers such as Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Carl Jung, Julia Kristeva, and Micheal Gurian. - Viktoria Sorochinski

 

Viktoria Sorochinski is a Ukrainian-born artist who has lived and studied in Russia, Israel, and Canada prior to settling in New York City.

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Texas Saigon | Photographer: Hahn Hartung

Texas Saigon | Photographer: Hahn Hartung | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The Vietnam War ruled 30 years of the country’s history in the 20thcentury. US Military invaded between 1965 and 1973 and sent hundreds of thousands of US soldiers into the war. The excuse was to prevent a Communist takeover of the whole country which was divided into the communist North, and the pro-American South. In1975 the North won the war and the last Americans left the country.

Forty years after the war there are no more foreign troops in the country but platoons of tourists visiting the old battlefields and tunnels excavated by Viet-Cong guerillas. There is a market selling old military stuff and even faking it. The Defoliation Spray called “Agent Orange” is still affecting the people and causes disabilities. During the war US Airforces dropped 7 million tons of bombs on Vietnam and there are still remaining bombs and landmines below ground. Even though America lost the war, capitalism finally triumphed and the remains of the war serve its prosperity. So we are looking at a country that has just opened up and the new generation is being exposed to a growing Western influence.

Roughly 40 years after the conflict ended, the absurdity of war and its consequences are more obvious than ever. - Hahn Hartung

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OCCUPIED PLEASURES | Photojournalist: Tanya Habjouqa - Award-winning photographer 2014 photo contest

OCCUPIED PLEASURES | Photojournalist: Tanya Habjouqa - Award-winning photographer 2014 photo contest | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

OCCUPIED PLEASURES

03 June 2013

A woman in Gaza without a travel permit marches through the silent dark of an underground tunnel on her way to a party in Egypt, clutching a bouquet of flowers.

More than four million Palestinians live in the West Bank, Gaza, and East Jerusalem, where the political situation regularly intrudes upon the most mundane of moments. People’s movements are circumscribed and the threat of violence often hangs overhead. This is an exploration of the small moments of pleasure where ordinary men and women demonstrate a desire to live, not just simply survive.

Photo report's insight:

Tanya Habjouqa was born in Jordan and educated in the United States, receiving her masters in Global Media and Middle East Politics from the University of London SOAS. Beginning her career in Texas, she documented Mexican migrant communities and urban poverty before returning to the Middle East.

Tanya is known for gaining unique access to sensitive gender, social, and human rights stories in the Middle East. She is a freelance photographer, features writer, and a founding member of the Rawiya photo collective (founded by five female photographers from across the Middle East).

She is a recipient of the Magnum Foundation 2013 Emergency Fund for her project ‘Occupied Pleasures’.

Habjouqa has worked on the front lines in Iraq, Lebanon, Darfur, and Gaza. Her series ‘Women of Gaza’ is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Based in East Jerusalem, she is working on personal projects that explore socio-political dynamics, identity politics, occupation, and subcultures of the Levant.

 WORLD PRESS PHOTO INVOLVEMENTAward-winning photographer 2014 photo contest
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Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti

Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lorsque la capitale ukrainienne a sombré dans la violence après plusieurs semaines d'un bras de fer entre forces de l'ordre et manifestants pro-européens, le 22 janvier 2014,  les affrontements du centre-ville, notamment sur la place de l'Indépendance ont pris l'allure d'un champ de bataille cinématographique. 

 

Jamais la presse n'avait reçu des photographies aussi "belles" et "picturales". La photographie la plus emblématique qui a fait le tour du monde, est celle du photographe Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti.

Photo report's insight:

Autres photos sur le site du Monde : 
http://www.lemonde.fr/europe/visuel/2014/01/23/la-semaine-ou-kiev-s-est-embrasee_4353592_3214.html ;

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Monsoon | Photojournalism: Steve McCurry

Monsoon | Photojournalism: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I was eleven years old when I saw a photo essay on the monsoon in India in Life Magazine by Brian Brake, the New Zealand-born Magnum photographer.

His work established his reputation as a master color photoessayist. Twenty years later, I proposed a story to National Geographic to photograph the monsoon. The next year I joined Magnum Photos.

People have often asked me what it was like spending almost a year photographing the monsoon. I spent several months following the monsoon which affects half the people on the planet.

Weather is often my best ally as I try to capture the perfect mood for my pictures, but photographing the monsoon was an experience that taught me a lot about patience and humility.

 

Photographing in heavy rain is difficult because you have to constantly wipe the rain drops from the camera lens. That takes about a third of the time. Monsoon rain is accompanied by winds that try to wrestle away the umbrella that is wedged between my head and shoulders.

I spent four days, in a flooded city in Gujarat, India, wading around the streets in waist-deep water that was filled with bloated animal carcasses and other waste material. The fetid water enveloped me leaving a greasy film over my clothes and body. Every night when I returned to my flooded hotel, empty except for a nightwatchman, I bathed my shriveled feet in disinfectant.

 

Once I was almost sucked down into one of the holes in the street in Bombay into which water was rushing. It took every bit of my strength to keep from losing my balance. After that close call, I shuffled along, inch by inch, yard by yard, until I had to abandon my cautious instincts.

I had to see the monsoon as a predictable yearly event, and not the disaster it seemed to my western eyes. The farmers experience the monsoon as an almost religious experience as they watch their fields come back to life after being parched for half the year.

 

When I was in Porbundar, the historic birthplace of Gandhi, I came upon a dog. There he was, locked out of the house, standing on a tiny piece of concrete as the flood waters rose. His expression betrayed his emotions. You can tell by the picture that he realizes his predicament and hope his owner opens the door soon.

Actually, a moment after I took the picture, the door opened and he ran inside."- Steve Mccurry

Photo report's insight:

Order Monsoon by Steeve Mccurry:

http://www.amazon.com/Monsoon-Steve-McCurry/dp/0500541353/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1318962167&sr=8-1 ;

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Living Periferia | Photographer: Alejandro Olivares -

Living Periferia | Photographer: Alejandro Olivares - | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The people captured in “Living Periferia” live with it every day of their lives. The violence, the drugs, the weapons, the lost bullets, which take dozens of lives every year… The fights, the battles with the police. Some barely escape. Others fall in the street law and to save them from oblivion their friends and family draw enormous pictures of them on the walls of the shantytown. It’s a posthumous tribute to their courage, their way to remember them as local heroes.

This work dives in a forgotten world, where many times not even mailmen are allowed in. It’s a world that goes beyond poverty. Wide ghettos in the further corners of Santiago where the State has managed for years to dump what they would rather not see. What investments must never see. What rich people should better keep ignoring.

Chile is now one of the richest countries in South America. The government celebrates the 4.4% economical growth in the last year and everyone claps when they say the international crisis hasn’t reached yet. But no one looks at this face of Chile when they receive the applauses. Derelict that generates more derelict. Violence that generates more violence. The toughest and more efficient school of crime. A society inside the society whit their own codes and mechanics that result inconceivable for the rest of the world. The order inside the chaos, where only the one who yells louder, the one who hits harder or the one who shoots faster can emerge. Or survive.

These photos are a personal puzzle about fragmented social representations. The foreign eyes of someone that, of all the going round, ended up being a local. But who’s look reflects the beauty of an ugly and shocking world to the eyes of whom looks from across the street.

Photo report's insight:

Alejandro Olivares (1981) is a Chilean photographer currently living in Santiago, Chile. He is the photo editor of The Clinic Magazine; correspondent for foreign agencies, several international agencies and photographer for “Felicidad” Design Agency in Chile. His work is divided between press coverage and documentary essay.

He has won multiple awards including; National Hall of Press Photo (Chile), Photo of the Year in the bicentenary version of the National Hall of Press Photo (Chile), Photo of the Year in Querétaro Photo Fest in Mexico, along with the second place in documentary essay in the same festival. He was nominated for the Rodrigo Rojas de Negri award in the years 2009, 2011, and 2012 and he was selected for the briefcase visionary PhotoEspaña 2011 in República Dominicana.

His work has been featured in exhibitions in Chile, Spain and the United States and has been published in several Chilean magazines and journals including “Qué Pasa”, “Joia”, “Pound”, “Guamá”, “Artishock” and “La Nación”. He has also published in foreign medias like “Soho” (Colombia), “Internazionale” (Italy), “Focus” (Italy), “10×15″ (Spain), “Piel de Foto” (Spain).

He has been honorably mentioned in the Zoom-In Poverty Contest, from the Agence Xinhua, China.

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Alessandro Zanini's curator insight, May 24, 2013 9:01 AM

Vita quotidiana nelle periferie di Santiago del Cile. 

 

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Christ’s Hospital | Photographer: Martin Parr

Christ’s Hospital | Photographer: Martin Parr | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Christ’s Hospital is one of the oldest schools in the country, they still wear Tudor uniforms and yellow socks.

They also have the biggest number of free/subsidised places, which are given to kids from London, as the school was originallyunder the juristrisction of the City of London."- Martin Parr 
Photo report's insight:

Martin Parr is a British documentary photographer, photojournalist and photobook collector. He is known for his photographic projects that take a critical look at aspects of modern life, in particular provincial and suburban life in England. He is a member of Magnum Photos.

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The evasion studie | Fine art photographer: Stevens Brahms

The evasion studie | Fine art photographer: Stevens Brahms | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

These images were taken by American photographer Steven Brahms, for his project titled “The Evasion Studies”. Simply put they are dramatic run-for-your-life style portraits in rather unfavourable everyday places. A very simple idea and beautifully executed. In recent news Steven was one of the 2012 recipients of the Aaron Siskind Foundation — Individual Photographer’s Fellowship. Check out his work, it’s all gold.

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Omo Valley | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Omo Valley | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

It was a privilege to go to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their work to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued.


I met John in Burma a few years ago. He is a photographer and successful businessman who has founded companies which develop software for digital media and the entertainment industry. 
He has also devoted a tremendous amount of time, energy, and financial assistance to the work of Omo Child. Lale was born into the Kara Tribe in the Omo River Valley.  He was one of the first of his tribe to receive a formal education.

 

That opportunity led him to realize the critical importance of ending the tribal ritual of Mingi. Lale lost two sisters to Mingi. Outlawing and stopping this devastating practice of Mingi is his life’s mission. - Steve Mccurry

Photo report's insight:

Please join me to help John and Lale rescue and care for these children.
http://www.omochild.org

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I'm The One Who... | Photographer: Alireza Fani

I'm The One Who... | Photographer: Alireza Fani | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"This series introduces a man whose eccentric glories belong to a remote, ambiguous past. His convictions are just a cover-up for the absurdity of his everyday life. 
… He is the embodiment of the spirit and aspirations of a nation. This heroic figure is not history as it occurred; he is the history as it was desired. He is more articulate than an account of wars and massacres, revealing the convictions of a nation that has long held such a vision ...

I was born in 1975 in Tehran-Iran. I received diploma in graphic design from Chamran technical high school of Gorgan, in 1994 I entered Azad university of art and architecture and studied graphic design , I resigned in 2000.  
I've been working as graphic designer, art director and freelance photographer since 1997 and started to focus on fine art photography since 2007." - Alireza Fani

Photo report's insight:

"...He is an embodiment of the spirit and aspirations of a nation. This heroic figure is not the history as it occurred; he is the history as it was desired. He is more articulate than an account of wars and massacres, revealing convictions of a nation that has long held such a vision...

An introduction to Rostam and Esfandiyar, p. 5, Shahrokh Meskoob

This series introduces a man whose eccentric glories belong to a remote, ambiguous past. His convictions were just a cover-up for the absurdity of his everyday life." - Alireza Fani

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Chandraprabhu temple of Jaisalmer | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Chandraprabhu temple of Jaisalmer | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Serge Bouvet was invited to photograph the Chandraprabhu temple of Jaisalmer. He have an appointment with jaïn monks at 5.30am. inside temple, it was very dark. He uses 4 flashes Canon Speedlite 580EX II, a reflector, a tripod and 50 rupees tip for priests.

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Living with the Hamer Tribe - Photographer | Mitchell Kanashkevich

Living with the Hamer Tribe - Photographer | Mitchell Kanashkevich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Around the middle of the road between two of Southern Ethiopia's larger towns - Arba Minch and Jinka, there is a signboard that reads "Welcome to Hamer." The sign marks a dusty road that continues for almost to 100 km, through African bush, towards the region of Turmi, the heart of the Hamer tribe.

The Hamers are one of the majority tribes in Ethiopia's ethnically diverse Omo Valley. They are proud and self-reliant, depending only on nature, their animals and their land for survival. Virtually everything about their world has a strong connection to the world of their ancestors, very little has been accepted from the outside. - Mitchell Kanashkevich


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Pavel Gospodinov's curator insight, January 13, 2013 1:31 PM

amazing photography and story really....

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A Better Tomorrow: Poonam's Tale of Hope in Bhopal | Documentary Photographer: Alex Masi -

A Better Tomorrow: Poonam's Tale of Hope in Bhopal | Documentary Photographer: Alex Masi - | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
A Better Tomorrow: Poonam's Tale of Hope in Bhopal: Poonam Jatev is a lively 8-year-old Indian girl from Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. Wide shiny eyes match a sweet cheeky smile, some attitude, and a lot of hope and trust in the future.

 

Alex Masi is an Italian documentary photographer and multimedia journalist based in London. His first-ever book “Bhopal Second Distaster” is a witness to the aftermath of the 1984 gas leak, widely thought to be one of the word’s most severe chemical disasters. The book is the stunning and heartbreaking product of the 2012 FotoEvidence Book Award, with an introduction by writer Indra Sinh, full-page color images, and an interview in the back by Svetlana Bachevanova, photographer and publisher at FotoEvidence. The images show the complex reality of lives affected by acute tragedy. “In Bhopal, once I began visiting disabled children, to see the way they and their families lived, it led to looking at how others were coping. I also wanted to show that there was life behind disaster.

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