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Manu National Park | Photographer: Charlie Hamilton James

Manu National Park | Photographer: Charlie Hamilton James | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Manu was my second story for the year long National Geographic series on National Parks. Remote and inaccessible, Manu ranges from the Peruvian Andes down into lowland rainforest and is the world's most bio-diverse national park. The subject of the coverage however was predominantly Manu's indigenous people. I spent weeks inside the park living with the Machiguenga in the communities of Yomibato and Tayakome. The lead image was one of Yoina (age 9) with her pet saddleback tamarin on her head. Many of the people I met on the assignment had only come into 'contact' days before I shot their portraits (at left and others similar in the gallery). Manu was a passion project as I have been visiting it for over twenty years.

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Conférence Picturing Poverty à Sciences Po | Serge Bouvet, photographe

Conférence Picturing Poverty à Sciences Po | Serge Bouvet, photographe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Le 16 septembre 2015, le Pôle Photographie du Bureau des Arts de Sciences Po m’a invité à intervenir à une conférence portant sur le thème de la pauvreté et de la précarité. A cette occasion, je présenterai en commentant une sélection de cinq photos prises entre 2012 et 2015. J’ai intitulé cette sélection, « Cinq portraits de l’Inde divisé ».

Photo report's insight:

"Lorsque j’ai réalisé mes premiers portraits, je me souviens que l’on m’avait reproché d’ignorer la classe moyenne. Mc Kinsey Global Institute l’évalue à 20% de la population2. Cette classe moyenne, c’est 200 millions de personnes sur 1,252 milliard d’Indiens3. Est-ce que montrer ces 200 millions de personnes qui ont un toit et mange à leur faim illustre la bonne santé de l’Inde. Je ne le crois pas. L’Inde est toujours malade. Je ne suis pas allé là-bas pour photographier les pauvres. Ce n’étaient pas mon objectif de photographier les pauvres, je voulais photographier des couleurs. Mais quand vous photographiez un indien, vous avez une ou deux chances sur trois de tomber sur un pauvre." - Serge Bouvet

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Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui

Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Homes in the village of Denganmal in western India do not have running water. The only drinking water comes from two wells at the foot of a hill outside the village. The well is often so crowded that the walk and wait can take hours in the sweltering heat.

Photo report's insight:

"I am a television news correspondent turned photographer, working for Reuters in Mumbai. I was brought up in the Indian capital Delhi but have been posted in Mumbai since summer 2010. With Reuters, I made my foray into professional photography. I've been learning something new about photography everyday on the job. Apart from taking pictures to go with the daily news, I have a keen interest in shooting in depth features and multimedia."- Danish Siddiqui

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Afghanistan | Photojournalist: Altaf Qadri

Afghanistan | Photojournalist: Altaf Qadri | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Altaf Qadri is a Kashmiri-Indian photojournalist with Associated Press.He has received several awards for is photographic work. The New York Times described his work as having a "sophisticated eye and highly effective technique."

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Autoportrait | Fine art photographer: Izumi Miyazaki 未設定

Autoportrait | Fine art photographer: Izumi Miyazaki 未設定 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

18-year-old Izumi Miyazaki arranges her daydreams into surreal photographs that are filled with deadpan humor. Each photo is manipulated so that the mundane becomes a little more magical. From levitating candy hearts to snow made of rice, Miyazaki ups the mystique with a wink of the eye.

By putting herself in the spotlight as the main subject, Miyazaki frees herself to being able to play with subtle changes in expression. Her photographs also call upon themes of identity and coming of age purely based on context. Because most of her artwork is staged in everday locations, they can almost be read as a visual diary of emotions.

The pure fun of Miyazaki’s photos is that they can be interpreted any number of ways: As a teenager’s creative way to express herself — or the product of a quirky overactive imagination.

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Texas Saigon | Photographer: Hahn Hartung

Texas Saigon | Photographer: Hahn Hartung | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The Vietnam War ruled 30 years of the country’s history in the 20thcentury. US Military invaded between 1965 and 1973 and sent hundreds of thousands of US soldiers into the war. The excuse was to prevent a Communist takeover of the whole country which was divided into the communist North, and the pro-American South. In1975 the North won the war and the last Americans left the country.

Forty years after the war there are no more foreign troops in the country but platoons of tourists visiting the old battlefields and tunnels excavated by Viet-Cong guerillas. There is a market selling old military stuff and even faking it. The Defoliation Spray called “Agent Orange” is still affecting the people and causes disabilities. During the war US Airforces dropped 7 million tons of bombs on Vietnam and there are still remaining bombs and landmines below ground. Even though America lost the war, capitalism finally triumphed and the remains of the war serve its prosperity. So we are looking at a country that has just opened up and the new generation is being exposed to a growing Western influence.

Roughly 40 years after the conflict ended, the absurdity of war and its consequences are more obvious than ever. - Hahn Hartung

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Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita

Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

"Serge Bouvet first went to India in 2012 with the plan to make a photo project about the hijras – a term used in Southeast Asia to define transgender people. But while documenting this story he discovered something else: the openness and beauty of the Muslim community living in the Turkman Gate old city in Delhi. Bouvet decided to photograph the Muslim men he met. And I talked to him about this project, about how he got the idea and about the way he approaches the people he photographs."- Bianca Olivia Nita

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He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page

He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
He Led the CIA to bin Laden—and Unwittingly Fueled a Vaccine Backlash. Pakistani doctor's role in health campaign sparked local suspicions that efforts to fight polio were part of a Western plot.
Photo report's insight:

PESHAWAR, Pakistan—In his native Pakistan, Dr. Shakil Afridi is considered a traitor by many people for helping the Central Intelligence Agency track down and kill Osama bin Laden. In the United States, he is hailed as a hero.

 

In global health circles, his story is a cautionary tale about the consequences that can spiral out of control when health professionals get too close to intelligence operations.

More than three years after U.S. Navy SEALs raided bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, it remains unclear whether Afridi knew he was working for the CIA when he led a hepatitis B vaccination campaign that helped U.S. agents learn where bin Laden was hiding.

Afridi's wife and his current lawyer, Qamar Nadeem Afridi, who is the doctor's cousin, say that he didn't know of the CIA connection, and U.S. intelligence specialists say that even if he did know, Afridi almost certainly had no idea that the man whose location he helped to identify was the world's most wanted terrorist.

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BAM – New Hope | National Geographic photographer: Elena Chernyshova

BAM – New Hope | National Geographic photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

A railway is not just tracks, trains, bridges, tunnels and stations. As with any ‘road’, it cannot function without the people who have built it, who are maintaining it and travel along it.

The legendary BAM railway (Baikal-Amur Mainline) traverses Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East about 600-700 km north of the Trans-Siberian railway. It stretches for thousands of kilometres and represents many decades of history – from its development by Gulag prisoners, followed by its construction by Komsomol (Communist Youth), through to the years of Perestroika and post-Soviet abandonment.

 

Historically BAM was unlucky. It was Brezhnev’s pet project. The Soviet government succeeded in mobilising hundreds of thousands of young people for its construction. Some were attracted by high salaries or the opportunity to get a sought-after car, whereas others came looking for adventure. The Soviet Union collapsed two years after the opening of the line. Prospects of economic and industrial development of rich deposits of Eastern Siberia got buried for decades. A newly constructed railway became “well forgotten”.

 

Currently life along the railway is stagnant. Without rail and industrial development, there is no future for its cities and villages. All hopes are being pinned on the ‘BAM-2′. The main part of the BAM railway has just a single track with many railway sidings. This limits its through capacity. The Russian Railways (RZD) is looking to double the traffic volume by 2017. The second track is crucial to the plans of industrial development of the region. This program is called ‘BAM-2′. 512 billion roubles have been allocated for its reconstruction.

Next stop? - Elena Chernyshova

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Clipping Path India's curator insight, March 9, 2016 5:32 AM

A railway is not just tracks, trains, bridges, tunnels and stations. As with any ‘road’, it cannot function without the people who have built it, who are maintaining it and travel along it.

The legendary BAM railway (Baikal-Amur Mainline) traverses Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East about 600-700 km north of the Trans-Siberian railway. It stretches for thousands of kilometres and represents many decades of history – from its development by Gulag prisoners, followed by its construction by Komsomol (Communist Youth), through to the years of Perestroika and post-Soviet abandonment.

 

Historically BAM was unlucky. It was Brezhnev’s pet project. The Soviet government succeeded in mobilising hundreds of thousands of young people for its construction. Some were attracted by high salaries or the opportunity to get a sought-after car, whereas others came looking for adventure. The Soviet Union collapsed two years after the opening of the line. Prospects of economic and industrial development of rich deposits of Eastern Siberia got buried for decades. A newly constructed railway became “well forgotten”.

 

Currently life along the railway is stagnant. Without rail and industrial development, there is no future for its cities and villages. All hopes are being pinned on the ‘BAM-2′. The main part of the BAM railway has just a single track with many railway sidings. This limits its through capacity. The Russian Railways (RZD) is looking to double the traffic volume by 2017. The second track is crucial to the plans of industrial development of the region. This program is called ‘BAM-2′. 512 billion roubles have been allocated for its reconstruction.

Next stop? - Elena Chernyshova

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Premier contact : gérer la première impression | Photographe: Serge Bouvet

Premier contact : gérer la première impression | Photographe: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

En photographie, je dirai même plus dans la vie tout court, la première impression va se jouer dans un laps de temps fugace, le temps d’un claquement de doigt. A l’issu de cette première impression, il sera possible ou non d’établir un lien avec votre sujet si vous êtes photographe, votre client potentiel si vous êtes un businessman ou votre futur dulcinée si vous êtes amoureux. Les rouages d’une relation sont les mêmes pour tous. En quelques lignes, je vous délivre les clés d’une prise de contact réussie. 

 

Chaque étape de la vie apporte ses leçons et elles tournent toutes autour d’une rencontre. La qualité d’un service, la puissance d’une culture d’entreprise, l’importance d’une part de marché, la communication, la qualité d’une bonne photo en ce qui me concerne à plus d’un titre, dépendent de deux facteurs : les gens et votre faculté à entrer en relation avec eux. La prise de contact n’est pas si compliquée mais demande un peu de… Oh pas grand chose… Des principes très basiques. J’ai appelé ces principes de bases : les Sésames de la convivialité.

 

Ces Sésames sont les préalables nécessaires qui vont déterminer la confiance, l’accessibilité de votre interlocuteur. La création d’un lien avec une personne suit un processus simple : la confiance se développe au niveau des instincts de base, puis le lien entre les personnalité s’établit, débouchant sur une relation qui sera le Sésame d’un monde de possibilités infinis.

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Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Chances are you already know Steve McCurry as the man who took one of the most iconic photos of our time. It was of a 12-year-old Afghan refugee girl who’s piercing green eyes told us her harrowing story. The image itself was named “the most recognized photograph” in the history of the National Geographic magazine and her face became famous as the cover photograph on their June 1985 issue. Beyond just that one photo, McCurry has shot over a million images spanning 35 years. More than anything, he is one of a few that has that amazing ability to capture stories of our shared human experience. As he says,


“Most of my images are grounded in people. I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey what it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape that you could call the human condition.”


"Looking through his large body of work, we get to experience fantastic faraway places we can only dream about visiting. It’s in his incredible photos that we feel connected to the world at large, appreciating our similarities and our differences, our cultures and our histories, and our past and our present in a truly unique and inspiring way."

 

"To develop this project, the first thing I did was simply to observe the life of people in this part of the world. Through photogenic documentation, I wanted to tell what I had seen, how the farmers grow and harvest the coffee, and their lifestyle. I tried to show their daily habits, I entered their homes and went to the plantations, I wandered through the villages and let the images scroll in front of my eyes, to tell of the faces, the stories and the atmosphere." - Steve McCurry

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Claudia Fano's curator insight, February 5, 2015 3:17 PM

This imagination is rare i wish i could think outside the box like this painting.

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The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe

The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For The Shepherd’s Realm: Volume III, photographer Andrew Fladeboe captures New Zealand’s courageous working dogs, tracing the historical threads that connect them to the verdant farms and steep hills of the country’s South Island.

 

Fladeboe has dedicated the last few years of his career to chronicling the millennia-long bond fostered between man and dog. Canines, he explains, have been by our side for more than 30,000 years, ensuring not only our prosperity but also our survival. In New Zealand in particular, herding dogs have been a crucial part of the cultural landscape since border collies emigrated from Scotland during the 19th century, and until fifty years ago, the sheep industry was New Zealand’s leading enterprise.

 

The artist explains that although working dogs are rarely petted or allowed inside, they do share a close friendship with the farmers who have trained them. Herding dogs are most often border collies of huntaways, a breed native to New Zealand, and they are bred and raised to be deeply in tune with the farmers. They can comprehend seven whistled commands and often can anticipate the wishes of the shepherd with whom they work side-by-side.

 

 

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A DAY WITH PATIENCE | Photographer: Lisa Weatherbee

A DAY WITH PATIENCE | Photographer: Lisa Weatherbee | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lisa Weatherbee’s series, 'A Day with Patience', is a record of just that: one day spent with a twelve year old girl, Patience, in her village in Ghana.

Having joined Photographers Without Borders, she arranged to spend a day with a young woman that the organisation put her in touch with, and the results are an open-hearted study of a day in the life of someone with whom, outwardly, the photographer had little in common. Weatherbee uses natural light, and her palette is bright and fresh: at times, the images almost recall fashion photography in their easy movement and the clean lines of Patience’s school uniform. 


Throughout the series, Weatherbee’s gaze is unobtrusive; Patience meets the lens’s eye with steadiness and maturity, and it is her world that we find ourselves in. While meditative moments are duly recorded, however, the viewer cannot forget that Patience is still a child: in one image, she plays on a slide with abandon, a carefree moment that almost comes as a surprise after the seriousness and composure that is recorded in the rest of the series.

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I'am French photographer - YouTube

Photos & Vidéos: Serge Bouvet Cities: Jodhpur, Delhi, Jaisalmer, Varanasi, Pushkar, Bikaner, Jaipur Mixed by: Serge Bouvet More photos at: sergebouvet.com
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Clipping Path India's comment, March 9, 2016 5:23 AM
Its nice!
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Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu

Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As smoking regulations in North America get stricter, the number of smokers, especially among younger generations, are in decline. If Mad Men taught us anything, it’s that smoking is not nearly as common as it used to be. In some circles, it can even be seen as taboo. Considering these changing habits of North Americans, it’s incredibly startling to see the recent series by Toronto based photographer Michelle Siu. For Marlboro Boys, she travelled to Indonesia to document the shocking reality of young smokers.

It’s easy to begin smoking when it’s presence is everywhere. As the fifth largest tobacco market in the world, Indonesians are bombarded with ever-present advertising targeting youth and easy access to cheap cigarettes (about one dollar a pack). The industry is closely tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. What’s most alarming, is that the habit is forming early. According to a recent study, the number of children smokers aged 10 to 14 has doubled over the past 20 years, and has tripled for those ages five to nine.

Photo report's insight:

"Indonesia’s relationship with tobacco is complex. Cheap cigarettes, ubiquitous advertising, a powerful lobby with tight political connections and lack of law enforcement fuels a national addiction. 

 

Indonesia holds one of the world’s highest rates of male smokers and it often begins at a young age. Boys are growing up in an environment where demand for tobacco is strong and foreign tobacco giants such as Marlboro maker Philip Morris, are establishing themselves as smoking rates decline in other countries. 

 

With the fifth largest tobacco market internationally, the industry is tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. Indonesia remains one of the few countries that has not joined the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control of the World Health Organization which aims “to protect present and future generations from the devastating health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke.” 

 

Young smokers begin the cycle of addiction but at a health cost for generations to come. The juxtaposition of young boys smoking like seasoned addicts is jarring yet this project is intended to not only shock and inform viewers but to demonstrate the lack of enforcement of national health regulations and to question the country’s dated relationship with tobacco." - MICHELLE SIU

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Bangladesh child marriage | Photojournalist: Allison Joyce

Bangladesh child marriage | Photojournalist: Allison Joyce | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of child marriage in the world. Around 29 percent of girls are married before the age of 15, and 65% of girls are already married by the time they turn 18. Families are often in a hurry to marry their daughters off, because girls are thought of as an economic burden. Education is considered unnecessary for girls, because boys get the jobs and bring the money in.

Child marriage is both physically and psychologically damaging. Girls who are forcibly married at a young age are more likely to experience domestic abuse than their unmarried peers and many girls report their first sexual experience is forced. A girl of 15 is five times more likely to die in childbirth than a woman in her twenties.

Allison Joyce, an American photojournalist based in Bangladesh, travelled to a rural area in Manikganj District, west of the capital, and photographed a wedding between a 15-year-old girl and a 32-year-old man.

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Crista K. Banks's curator insight, September 7, 2015 9:57 PM

In the larger cities of these countries child marriage and being bonded has been outlawed, however there are so many people in the rural areas continuing old "traditions." Many times, people in the rural areas do not even know the laws and the problem is compounded because there is noone from the the law there to make sure these practices are being stopped. 

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Corporates | Photographer: Ritam Banerjee

Corporates | Photographer: Ritam Banerjee | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Ritam Banerjee is an Indian photographer, specialising in a variety of fields such as travel, fashion, photojournalism, advertising, interiors, portraits and automobiles, among others. He started pursuing photography in 1996. A freelance photographer, Ritam also works with and is globally represented by Getty Images.

Photo report's insight:

Based out of Mumbai, Ritam has never quite understood the need to create a niche. Shooting extensively across categories—travel, photojournalism, advertising, interiors, portraits, automobiles, fashion, food—he has always sought inspiration and challenge in variety. From training his lens at the blazing dome of the Taj Palace & Tower when Mumbai was under siege in 2008 to documenting the placid course of the middle and lower Ganges, Ritam has framed things as disparate as spas and slums, ketchup and cars. Over the last decade, Ritam has worked with corporates and publications across continents, and has also been associated with the global agency, Getty Images. Apart from stills, he shoots commercial AVs, and has recently worked as a cinematographer for a feature film. Ritam has also been in the news for his theme-based calendars and his exhibitions. - Ritam Banerjee

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Hamburg, stage theater an der elbe | Fine Art Photographer: ERWIN OLAF

Hamburg, stage theater an der elbe | Fine Art Photographer: ERWIN OLAF | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Erwin Olaf Springveld , professionally known as Erwin Olaf, is a Dutch photographer.

Erwin Olaf Springveld was born on 2 June 1959 in Hilversum in the Netherlands. Springveld is most famous for his commercial and personal work. He has been commissioned to photograph advertising campaigns for large international companies such as Levi's, Microsoft and Nokia.

 

Some of his most famous photographic series include "Grief", "Rain", and "Royal Blood". Never one to shy away from controversy, Springveld's work is often daring and provocative. Humorously however, one of his early photographs was once expelled from a show on the basis of not containing nudity.

 

His work has received many awards[4] and he has held exhibitions around the world. Springveld studied journalism in the School of Journalism in Utrecht.

 

His work is shown in galleries and museums all around the world, for example at Wagner + Partner, Berlin; Flatland Gallery, Utrecht; Hamiltons Gallery, London; Galerie Magda Danysz, Paris; Gallery Espacio Minimo, Madrid ; and many others. Springveld designed the 2014 Dutch euro coins with the portrait of King Willem-Alexander.

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PURE | Photographer: HUANG JUNYUAN

PURE | Photographer: HUANG JUNYUAN | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Guangzhou based fashion photographer Huang Junyuan brings us a very mysterious and solemn series called “Pure”. Although the red and white sets of images are both mysterious and solemn, they each convey a very different tone and mood.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 23, 2015 9:58 PM

UNA SERIE DE FOTOGRAFÍAS LLAMADA "PURE" DONDE EL ROJO Y EL BLANCO DE LAS IMÁGENES SON A LA VEZ  MISTERIOSAS Y SOLEMNES CADA UNO DE ELLOS TRANSMITEN UN TONO Y EL ESTADO DE ÁNIMO MUY DIFERENTE.

Guangzhou fotógrafo de moda basada Huang Yuan

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Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Usually, in India, the Muslim segregated areas are seen as ghettos. However, these should be seen as cultural pockets, where group solidarity is strong. Turkman Gate is the old city around which the New Delhi city has come up. It would be wrong to brand whole of Turkman Gate as a ghetto, as it houses various wholesale markets and different communities as well. Ghettos are usually formed by new migrants to the city to hold on to their culture in an alien environment. People have been living here since centuries; they are the real residents of Delhi city and still follow age-old ‘Delhi culture." Serge Bouvet

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BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson

BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The wigmen of the Huli people aren’t like Western toupee manufacturers. They are wizards who only work with people who have fine heads of hair. What a traditional wigman does is use ancient magic to make hair grow faster than normal so it can be cut off and turned into a wig. Evidently, magic – like hair restorer – doesn’t work if the hair is long gone." - Jimmy Nelson

Photo report's insight:

Jimmy Nelson is a British photojournalist and photographer known for his portraits of tribal and indigenous peoples. 

 

In 2009 Nelson started to work on his biggest project to-date, Before they Pass Away. He travelled for 3 years and photographed more than 35 indigenous tribes around the world in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, and the South Pacific, using a 50-year-old 4x5in camera.[5] Nelson said that the project was "inspired by Edward Sheriff Curtis and his great photographs of Native Americans". The tribes that Nelson photographed include the Huli and Kalam tribes of New Guinea, the Tsaatan of Mongolia and the Mursi people of the Omo River valley in southern Ethiopia. Jimmy borrowed the funds from a Dutch billionaire, Marcel Boekhoorn.

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Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova

Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

The documentary was held in Norilsk between February 2012 and February 2013.
The documentary was supported by the Lagardère foundation grant for photography.

« Days of Night – Nights of Day » is about the daily life of the inhabitants of Norilsk, a mining city northernmost of the polar circle with a population of more than 170 000.  The city, its mines and metallurgical factories were constructed by prisoners of the Gulag.  With 60% of the present population involved in the industrial process, this documentary aims to investigate human adaptation to extreme climate, ecological disaster and isolation.
Norilsk is the 7th most polluted city in the world.  The average temperature is -10C, reaching lows of -55C in winter, when for two months the city is plunged into polar night.
The living conditions of the people of Norilsk are unique, making their plight incomparable. - Elena Chernyshova

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REK | Photographer: Juuke Schoorl

REK | Photographer: Juuke Schoorl | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With 'Rek' (stretch in Dutch) I explore the aesthetic possibilities of the human skin through a mixture of image capturing techniques. By manipulating this curious stretchable material with various low budget materials like nylon fishing rope and cello tape I am able to temporarily shape it into surprising textures and shapes. Highlighting not only it’s flexibility and adaptability but also it’s function as our own biological upholstery that aside from it’s protective capabilities could also serve as a medium for aesthetic expression, possibly in the form of a dress less fashion.- 

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Heidi Spencer's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:32 AM

I chose this website because, this photographer "Juuke Schoorl" have very clear pictures that i could use as a good example of a good picture taken by a great photographer.

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India | Photographer: Jason Wallis

India | Photographer: Jason Wallis | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jason Wallis is an editorial and advertising photographer based in Birmingham, Alabama. He recently returned from a trip to Northern India to document, through portraits, the work ofNever Thirst, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing clean water to those who have none. Of the series, he says: “India is such a paradoxical place for me. It’s one of the dirtiest places I have ever been, with the most vibrant colors and people I have ever met. I met villagers that had never seen white men before. The Indian people are a curious sort, so we drew crowds every time we showed up in a village and pulled out our gear. I can only imagine what they were thinking seeing these ghosts of men pulling out their flashing lights!”

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 2014 4:44 PM

I was fascinated by looking at some of the pictures that this amazing photographer took. You can really get a sense of what the photographer was trying to capture and the sense of feel throughout the pictures.