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Manu National Park | Photographer: Charlie Hamilton James

Manu National Park | Photographer: Charlie Hamilton James | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Manu was my second story for the year long National Geographic series on National Parks. Remote and inaccessible, Manu ranges from the Peruvian Andes down into lowland rainforest and is the world's most bio-diverse national park. The subject of the coverage however was predominantly Manu's indigenous people. I spent weeks inside the park living with the Machiguenga in the communities of Yomibato and Tayakome. The lead image was one of Yoina (age 9) with her pet saddleback tamarin on her head. Many of the people I met on the assignment had only come into 'contact' days before I shot their portraits (at left and others similar in the gallery). Manu was a passion project as I have been visiting it for over twenty years.

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He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page

He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
He Led the CIA to bin Laden—and Unwittingly Fueled a Vaccine Backlash. Pakistani doctor's role in health campaign sparked local suspicions that efforts to fight polio were part of a Western plot.
Photo report's insight:

PESHAWAR, Pakistan—In his native Pakistan, Dr. Shakil Afridi is considered a traitor by many people for helping the Central Intelligence Agency track down and kill Osama bin Laden. In the United States, he is hailed as a hero.

 

In global health circles, his story is a cautionary tale about the consequences that can spiral out of control when health professionals get too close to intelligence operations.

More than three years after U.S. Navy SEALs raided bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, it remains unclear whether Afridi knew he was working for the CIA when he led a hepatitis B vaccination campaign that helped U.S. agents learn where bin Laden was hiding.

Afridi's wife and his current lawyer, Qamar Nadeem Afridi, who is the doctor's cousin, say that he didn't know of the CIA connection, and U.S. intelligence specialists say that even if he did know, Afridi almost certainly had no idea that the man whose location he helped to identify was the world's most wanted terrorist.

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Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald

Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
MIAMI har gennem årtier været et yndet tilflugtssted for vidt forskellige befolkningsgrupper. ”A melting pot of cultures” kalder de lokale byen. Kendt for at huse ældre amerikanere, de såkaldte ”snowbirds”, som flytter hertil i alderdom- men for at få opfyldt pensionistdrømmen. Og for hvert år at indvaderes af tusindvis af unge collegestuderende, som tager hertil for at feste vildt og holde Spring Break. Miami er på mange måder en slags Latinamerikas hovedstad. Ja mange mener ikke egentlig ikke, at byen er en rigtig del af USA. 70 procent af byens befolkning er hispanics og taler spansk, mens de hvide udgør en minoritet. Med solskin og varme året rundt er denne smeltedigel en speciel og tiltrækkende magnet for mange grupper: immigran- ter, der søger politisk asyl, folk, der vil opleve den amerikanske drøm, og rige, der vil nyde livet i dette dragende paradis. En ting er fælles for alle de forskellige grupper, der søger her til: De søger det gode liv.
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Children of the Omo | Photographer: Steve Mc Curry

Children of the Omo | Photographer:  Steve Mc Curry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia. It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley, with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. "


" The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley live without clean drinking water and without medical care. It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued. " 

 

" Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer,  learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture. " - Steve McCurry

Photo report's insight:

More information: http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

agregar su visión ...

JackPreguiss's curator insight, March 12, 2015 4:42 PM

um trabalho , onde envolve sensibilidade , este fotografo STEVE MCCURRY, trabalha não só com sua câmera , mais com seus sentimentos e com o sentimento do sujeito fotografado , é maravilhoso, ele consegue registrar não só o físico ... como também a alma da pessoa.

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The life and struggle of Garment workers | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter

The life and struggle of Garment workers | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
“I wanted to be an artist by drawing and making handicraft but my dream is now ruined under the niddle of machine, under the rubble and sometimes by fire”- Lija a garment worker With a dream of living a better life million of workers from villages gather in workers barrack in cities. Lija, Modhumala, Shomapti, Masud, Brojesshwar are among them. Among more than 4 million workers 80% are women.  Surrounding the garment industries large workers barracks have grown in Bangladesh.  Workers toil from dawn to dusk for a minimum wage of BDT3000 taka a month (less than 37 $) till 2013.  Government declared a new gross minimum wage BDT 5300 ( near about $66) , which is not sufficient for them to survive. This 4 million workers are not more demanding. They don’t have any dream to have car-house, even any luxury item in life. They want only coarse rice-cloth and a little roof over the head to stay anyway. They want to send their children to school. They don’t want to send their children i
Photo report's insight:

 Taslima Akhter turned to documentary photography after many years as an activist with workers’ and women's rights organizations with whom she continues to work. She considers her documentary photography as a continuation of her activism. As a photographer, she likes to work on issues relating to gender, the environment and culture, as well as exploring spaces of social discrimination. Taslima's photo "Final Embrace" was selected as one of TIME Magazine’s top 10 photos of 2013.

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Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet

Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nothing better reflects the strangeness of a people than the environment in which he lives. So I decided to import a part of India in Europe, framed in a bus shelter or ad showcase to create an open-air museum. Sometimes it coexists funny interaction between the two dimensions. These photos are a poetry of Rajasthan." - Serge Bouvet

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Not in vain | Photographer: Christina Paige

Not in vain | Photographer: Christina Paige | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Christina is a graduate of the International Center of Photography's program in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism. She was chosen as one of Photo District News's 30 Emerging Photographers for 2008, where she was described as finding "grace and bits of humor swirling in the maelstrom of everyday life." Before becoming a photographer, she worked as a clinical social worker with Spanish-speaking communities in California and Massachusetts. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.

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Only Unity - | Photographer: Matt Lutton

Only Unity -  | Photographer: Matt Lutton | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Only Unity”: Serbia In The Aftermath of Yugoslavia has emerged from five years of living and working in the Balkans; it is my personal response to the confounding atmosphere of the region. My project presents a psychological portrait of Serbs from across the Balkans as they confront a radically changed landscape within physically contracting borders. Serbia is emerging from the hangover of the 1990s, where atrocities were carried out in their name just across newborn borders, and constructive reflection about the consequences of those years is over due.

 

I am photographing details of society that both reflect and undermine the popular Serbian creation myths. Many issues are rooted in the complicated phrase “Only Unity Saves the Serbs” which was popular in the narrative of mass political manipulation during the disintegration of Yugoslavia and the wars that took place in its vacuum. Serbia is still recovering from the post- traumatic stress of those years, leading to a national confusion about their identity and a productive path forward.

I have focused on diverse subjects within the Serbian landscape which are far removed from any reality espoused by politicians. Young men and women are being raised in a divided, uncertain atmosphere and I hope to capture that essence so that we can further consider the implications of a Balkan region that is led by this generation. It is impossible to analyze or understand any event in this region without first considering its historical roots. I am interested in exploring and understanding the parts of today’s Balkan society that the next generation will read about in their history textbooks. What is happening now in the streets and in political negotiations will have profound impact on regional stability in the future.

 

There are many elements that contribute to a hostile and sometimes desperate atmosphere in Serbia today. But there too are moments that show healing and a glimpse at a different future than many have seen for themselves in the last decade. The growing pains of this developing democracy must continue to be carefully documented and explored, as the battles of the 1990s have yet to be finally played out. I’ve experienced alarming apathy and lack of compassion from many youth across the Balkans, and I hope to confront them directly with a different picture of the countries and history they will inherit. I hope my pictures will help bridge local borders, real and imagined. - Matt Lutton

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Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva

Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Once upon a time in Siberia, on the shores of the Arctic Ocean, in a warm bed in a small town, a little girl woke up from a dream. It was morning, but it was still dark out, for the little town was so far North that the sun would not show itself for many months. They called this the Polar Night.

The little girl rubbed the sleep from her eyes and dressed in the dark. She put on her pink jacket and red stocking cap and stepped outside. Her breath froze and she walked in the direction of school. All around her were endless fields of frozen tundra. But the fields were not white like you might think, for up above the Aurora Borealis lit up the sky. It looked like a big green breath frozen in the heavens and all around the little girl were beautiful colors. The snow was painted green. And on some mornings—if she was lucky—she’d even see bits of blue, yellow and pink on her walk to school.

She loved these colors very much. Walking through them made her imagination come alive. She liked to think of the fields as blank canvases for Mother Nature to paint upon. And what did that make her? Was she part of the painting too, in her pink jacket and red hat?

She smiled and her mind began dreaming of the days when the Polar Night would come to an end, when the first sun would light up the snowy mountains, making it look like blueberry ice cream. And then the summer would come, the snow would melt and the tundra would transform into planet Mars with it’s golden color seeming to stretch out forever in every direction.

She thought to herself, “Every season has its own colors.” She stored all these colors in her heart, and walked beneath the Aurora Borealis in this little town way up North.

The town was called Tiksi. - 

 

Photo report's insight:

Evgenia Arbugaeva is one of 50 photographers in the Critical Mass 2011 exhibition Contents: Love, Anxiety, Happiness & Everything Else atPhoto Center NW. This exhibition, juried by Darius Himes, will also travel to Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, and RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, furthering the mission of all four photography organizations to bring top emerging talent to the public.

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Chinese Sentiment | Photographer: Shen Wei 沈玮

Chinese Sentiment | Photographer: Shen Wei 沈玮 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Shen Wei’s Chinese Sentiment series was photographed from 2008 to 2010 in Mainland China. The series is the artist’s personal journey to explore the authentic China, from both public and private perspectives. The series shows a poetic and romantic side of China. Consistent with Shen Wei's sensual and emotional style, the images are loving and keenly felt. Shen Wei’s first monograph, Chinese Sentiment, with an introduction by Peter Hessler, was published by Charles Lane Press (New York) in May, 2011.

Photo report's insight:

"I am a Chinese photographer currently works in both New York and Shanghai. I am fascinated with people and culture and obsessed with travel and technology." said Shen Wei. 

 

Shen Wei 沈玮 is a Chinese artist known for his intimate portraits of others and himself, as well as his photographic exploration of contemporary China.

Born in Shanghai, China, Shen Wei lives in New York City. Having grown up in a shanty town in Yangpu District of Shanghai, he began his art training at an early age at a local Children's Palace.

Shen Wei’s work has been exhibited and published internationally. In 2007, American Photo magazine named Shen Wei one of the Top 15 Emerging Artists in the world. In 2008, he was included in the Photo District News’ 30 photographers to watch list. Shen Wei is the winner of 2012 Philadelphia Museum of Art Photography Portfolio Competition.

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David Hellard's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:05 PM

Outstanding photographic series. I would love to see more.

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Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz

Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Most people say that street photography features people photographed on the street in unposed situations. For me this definition is simply too broad as it includes portraiture, reportage and peopled cityscape, which might have nothing to do with the genre. For me this broad definition can be narrowed easily to define proper street photography by adding just one word – “a twist”. A little twist – something clever, funny, unexpected, surprising or ambiguous. Something making you scratch your head, something putting a smile on your face… And the photo does not have to be taken on the street – it can be shot indoors, on the beach or in the forest. What matters is that little “twist”.
 
What are the key elements of a good photo? In my opinion it is the content, composition and light. The content is most important for me. Sometimes a poorly composed and lit photograph still can be good, what matters is the message it conveys. The composition is the way elements are placed and related to each other in the frame. It greatly depends on the distance from the subject – usually the closer you get the more dynamic perspectives you can achieve that can make your compositions more interesting.

 

The light is what illuminates the scene and produces shadows and highglights in the image. It can be natural or artificial. It can be a direct sunlight (which can be soft or harsh depending on the time of the day), soft ambient light in the shade or flash produced by the flashgun on top of the camera. When these three elements come together nicely in one frame you most probably have a great photo."- Maciej Sakowicz

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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, October 23, 2013 11:53 AM

Another very good set of street photography

Martin Lea's curator insight, November 10, 2013 7:17 AM

that is it..........a moment or a thought or a caption ..............you just see it ior sense but of course you have to capture it !!

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BERLIN | Fine art photographer: Erwin Olaf

BERLIN | Fine art photographer: Erwin Olaf | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"My latest series, Berlin, is a multimedia presentation of photography, film and 3D work. The series is about the relationship of the child and the adult, and how that relationship is shifting. It’s unclear who is in charge, and who is directing who. I was inspired by several things for this series, by the city Berlin, but also by this changing relationship between child and adult. I tried to translate that into my work, but without giving a clear discourse." - Erwin Olaf

Photo report's insight:

Erwin Olaf (Erwin Olaf Springveld) (born June 2, 1959 Hilversum, Netherlands) is a Dutch photographer.

Olaf is most famous for his commercial and personal work. He has been commissioned to photograph advertising campaigns for large international companies such as Levi's, Microsoft and Nokia. Some of his most famous photographic series include "Grief", "Rain", and "Royal Blood". Never one to shy away from controversy, Olaf's work is often daring and provocative. Humorously however, one of his early photographs was once expelled from a show on the basis of not containing nudity.

His work has received many awards and he has held exhibitions around the world.

Olaf studied journalism in the School of Journalism in Utrecht. His work is shown in galleries and museums all around the world, for example at Flatland Gallery, Utrecht; Hasted Hunt, New York; Hamiltons Gallery, London; Galerie Magda Danysz, Paris; Gallery Espacio Minimo, Madrid ; and many others.

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Martin Lea's curator insight, November 10, 2013 7:20 AM

uncertain about this .............maybe that is the point though ........

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Street photography | Photographer: Frédéric Le Mauff

I’m in my late 30’s and live in Lyon, France.

I lived my first 20 years far away from any crowded life. However, when I moved in a big city, I immediately enjoyed wandering the streets for hours.

By a combination of circumstances, I laid a hand on a camera. It was in 2006. I then dabbled in photography for a while, and some years later I figured out that it was possible to wander the streets and take pictures. I still remember my very first candid shot at a close distance. It was on December 2, 2008. Since then, I am trying to shoot street photography.

I have no moral consideration, no mission, no defined project. I’m not documenting anything. I only try to put in images my fascination for strangers.- 

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County Fair | Photographer: Greg Miller

County Fair | Photographer: Greg Miller | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Greg Miller’s large format photography has appeared in numerous publications including The New York Times Magazine, New York Magazine, TIME, Esquire, Fortune, LIFE, and more. 

 

Predominantly using an 8×10 view camera, Greg Miller‘s photography utilizes street photography, found moments and portraiture to capture human relationships and a sense of suspended reality. In 2008, he received a Fellowship in photography from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. 

 

 

"I had the good fortune of starting early. I got into photography taking pictures for my high school yearbook and working for a photographer in Nashville, my hometown. There is a long string of people who influenced me early on but it all really started with my dad who was an amateur photographer.

When I came to New York in 1986 I studied at The School of Visual Arts. One of my first teachers there was Lois Conner who later introduced me to Andrea Modica and Judith Joy Ross. The three of them have been and continue to be really big influences on me. Lois shoots with 7×17 and 8×10 view cameras and Andrea and Judith shoot 8×10." - GREG MILLER

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BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson

BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The wigmen of the Huli people aren’t like Western toupee manufacturers. They are wizards who only work with people who have fine heads of hair. What a traditional wigman does is use ancient magic to make hair grow faster than normal so it can be cut off and turned into a wig. Evidently, magic – like hair restorer – doesn’t work if the hair is long gone." - Jimmy Nelson

Photo report's insight:

Jimmy Nelson is a British photojournalist and photographer known for his portraits of tribal and indigenous peoples. 

 

In 2009 Nelson started to work on his biggest project to-date, Before they Pass Away. He travelled for 3 years and photographed more than 35 indigenous tribes around the world in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, and the South Pacific, using a 50-year-old 4x5in camera.[5] Nelson said that the project was "inspired by Edward Sheriff Curtis and his great photographs of Native Americans". The tribes that Nelson photographed include the Huli and Kalam tribes of New Guinea, the Tsaatan of Mongolia and the Mursi people of the Omo River valley in southern Ethiopia. Jimmy borrowed the funds from a Dutch billionaire, Marcel Boekhoorn.

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AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte

AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

This is Habib Manzah Iddi’s first motorcycle. He is part of a growing new generation of youth that is aware of the surrounding world and strives towards their dreams. They are determined not to live like their parents did, but wish to assimilate to the modern world.

According to the UN site World’s Best News, every third African is now considered middle class, around 33% of the population having up to $20 dollars to spend a day. With the extreme poverty of the last few decades slowly dissipating, people in places like Ghana can afford more than just food for survival. Across the continent, Africans are spending more money on education, healthcare and entrepreneurial endeavors, creating a landscape of rapid cultural, economic and social change. Danish photographer Ulrik Tofte documents the young people in the middle of this transformative upheaval, their lives a constant balance of old traditions and new possibilities.

The Key Is Not To Blink presents a different vision of Africa than we are used to. Tofte focused on youth in Northern Ghana, determined to capture images contrasting the typical photos of war and starving children so familiar to us. The growing middle class has created a culture more focused on the individual – people now more free to have dreams, desires and personal goals. Torn between issues of religion, pop culture, familial expectations and consumerism, young Africans have an uncertain and limitless world in which to navigate their lives. Though progress can be slow, Ghana and other countries like it continue to move forward while trying to preserve some sense of their past.

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OCCUPIED PLEASURES | Photojournalist: Tanya Habjouqa - Award-winning photographer 2014 photo contest

OCCUPIED PLEASURES | Photojournalist: Tanya Habjouqa - Award-winning photographer 2014 photo contest | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

OCCUPIED PLEASURES

03 June 2013

A woman in Gaza without a travel permit marches through the silent dark of an underground tunnel on her way to a party in Egypt, clutching a bouquet of flowers.

More than four million Palestinians live in the West Bank, Gaza, and East Jerusalem, where the political situation regularly intrudes upon the most mundane of moments. People’s movements are circumscribed and the threat of violence often hangs overhead. This is an exploration of the small moments of pleasure where ordinary men and women demonstrate a desire to live, not just simply survive.

Photo report's insight:

Tanya Habjouqa was born in Jordan and educated in the United States, receiving her masters in Global Media and Middle East Politics from the University of London SOAS. Beginning her career in Texas, she documented Mexican migrant communities and urban poverty before returning to the Middle East.

Tanya is known for gaining unique access to sensitive gender, social, and human rights stories in the Middle East. She is a freelance photographer, features writer, and a founding member of the Rawiya photo collective (founded by five female photographers from across the Middle East).

She is a recipient of the Magnum Foundation 2013 Emergency Fund for her project ‘Occupied Pleasures’.

Habjouqa has worked on the front lines in Iraq, Lebanon, Darfur, and Gaza. Her series ‘Women of Gaza’ is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Based in East Jerusalem, she is working on personal projects that explore socio-political dynamics, identity politics, occupation, and subcultures of the Levant.

 WORLD PRESS PHOTO INVOLVEMENTAward-winning photographer 2014 photo contest
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In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“My first inspirations were world-changers like James Nachtwey, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry. I firmly believe that photography has a role to play in provoking thought, spurring dialogue, and prompting action—therein being a potentially potent ingredient in an antidote to social evils.

“Photographs are informative, a record of what we do and value, and contribute important subjective testimonies for history.

 

That said, worldwide trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with over 700,000 women moved across international borders annually. It is not at all realistic to imagine photos making any substantial dent to improve this situation. The photos I take will do little to directly improve the lives of women and children in Sonagachi.

 

“To do this would take massive political, economic and legal overhauls, not to mention years of reshaping social values. This was one of my hardest realizations when following apparently humanistic callings. That images can, however, give people a voice and better inform a public debate, is some journalistic consolation. What makes it immediately worthwhile for me is the experience of earning an individual’s trust, and for a while, touching lives, sharing stories and learning from each other in a dignified, respectful, curious manner. This is the only honest thing I can convince people of offering them, and surprisingly it is also what seems to open the most doors for me.” - Souvid Datta

Photo report's insight:

Mumbai-born photographer Souvid Datta is a young man of 21 whose age puts him somewhere in between the subjects he’s been documenting in the infamous red-light district of Kolkata, India and the subjects’ children. His series, In the Shadows of Kolkata, portrays a close-knit group of female sex workers, a few of their clients, and their children. Exploring the lives of sex workers as a photographic “theme” never fails to affect, and seeing children interspersed into this work adds another layer of difficult material to digest, question, process

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Les Visages des Puces | Photographer: Andrew Kovalev

Les Visages des Puces | Photographer: Andrew Kovalev | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen, located in the suburbs of Paris, is the biggest and one of the oldest flea markets in the world. It is said, that the expression “flea market” itself originates from here. It is a conglomerate of 14 smaller markets, each with its own features and speciality. It is a part of the cultural and historical heritage of France and a place of great touristic interest. Most importantly, it is a sophisticated social organism, a vast community of people who are passionate about their very special craft.

 

The goal of this project is to document the look and the spirit of the place in showing its face and soul. To show incredible diversity of its parts, which are merging together in one entity, while remaining the separate worlds.

 

This series portrays the people of The Market. Those, who live and work there, who actually create, preserve and change the place throughout its years and decades.



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In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY

In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
After 150 years of broken promises, the Oglala Lakota people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota are nurturing their tribal customs, language, and beliefs. A rare, intimate portrait shows their resilience in the face of hardship. 

Almost every historical atrocity has a geographically symbolic core, a place whose name conjures up the trauma of a whole people: Auschwitz, Robben Island, Nanjing. For the Oglala Lakota of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that place is a site near Wounded Knee Creek, 16 miles northeast of the town of Pine Ridge. From a distance the hill is unremarkable, another picturesque tree-spotted mound in the creased prairie. But here at the mass grave of all those who were killed on a winter morning more than a century ago, it’s easy to believe that certain energies—acts of tremendous violence and of transcendent love—hang in the air forever and possess a forever half-life.

 

Alex White Plume, a 60-year-old Oglala Lakota activist, lives with his family and extended family on a 2,000-acre ranch near Wounded Knee Creek. White Plume’s land is lovely beyond any singing, rolling out from sage-covered knolls to creeks bruised with late summer lushness. From certain aspects, you can see the Badlands, all sun-bleached spires and scoured pinnacles. And looking another way, you can see the horizon-crowning darkness of the Black Hills of South Dakota.

 

One hot and humid day in early August, I drove out to interview White Plume in a screened outdoor kitchen he had just built for his wife. Hemp plants sprouted thickly all over their garden. “Go ahead and smoke as much as you like,” White Plume offered. “I always tell people that: Smoke as much as you want, but you won’t get very high.” The plants are remnants from a plantation of industrial hemp—low-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) Cannabis sativa—cultivated by the White Plume family in 2000.

Fuller text: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/08/pine-ridge/fuller-text ;
Photo report's insight:

Aaron Huey is a National Geographic photographer and a Contributing Editor for Harper's Magazine. He is based in Seattle, WA.

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Translations | Photographer: Sofie Knijff

Translations | Photographer: Sofie Knijff | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Over the past years, Sofie Knijff has travelled across South Africa, India, Mali, Brazil, Iceland and Greenland to portray children and their fantasy worlds & dreams. Her aim was to isolate them from their surroundings, and daily lives, and focus their attention to reveal their own “dream character”. By using the same backdrop, she created a stage on which the dreams could come to life. The challenge was to build a subtle and yet sustained level concentration to capture the moment of transformation. At the same time, she took images of the empty spaces in which the same children live; allowing to create a set of images where the inside and outside mirror and influence one another. The impact of time underpins this project." - Sophie Knijff 

Photo report's insight:

Belgian-born photographer Sofie Knijff has spent the last three years traveling the world making portraits of children and asking them one question: what do you want to be when you grow up? With limitless imagination the children answer, dressing up as their future selves in a series she calls Translations. By using similar backdrops for each child, Knijff strips them of their current surroundings in order to focus more intimately on their “dream characters.”

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Portraitlandia | Photographer: Kirk Crippens

Portraitlandia | Photographer: Kirk Crippens | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

When Kirk Crippens went on a five-week residency at Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, Ore., he welcomed the opportunity to shift gears a bit. The residency allowed him to work without distraction from life’s daily grind, and he was able to take a break from his long-term project about the recession toward something more whimsical. The result was a portrait-based series, “Portraitlandia,” in which he turned his camera on the people of Portland.

 

Although he was only in Portland for about a month, Crippens spent close to a year preparing for the residency, acting a bit like a tourist and scouting out possible portrait subjects through word of mouth. He decided to follow his subjects’ lead regarding locations for the shoot, and he asked them also to give him two hours of their time to create the portrait—an unusually long commitment for Crippens. “I wanted to do something that had authenticity while being aware I was new to Portland and didn’t have the time to build the relationships I would normally have,” he said.

 

Crippens also decided to work outside of his comfort zone and shot the entire series with a 4-by-5 view camera using film. It was the first time for him using the camera, and he practiced using it before heading to Portland. He said it allowed him to slow down his process, and it broke the ice a bit with his subjects who were curious about the camera. “Working in a slow, analog medium really leant itself to having an opportunity to get to know the folks,” he said. “It gave an expansiveness to their sessions.”

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Some Fox Trails In Virginia | Photographer: Susan Worsham

Some Fox Trails In Virginia | Photographer: Susan Worsham | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

    This series of photographs is taken in and around Virginia, the place in which I grew up. The title comes from a book written by my father's ancestor, to show the lineage of the Fox family in Virginia. For my own purpose, it acts as a metaphorical map, of the rediscovered paths of my childhood home.

           At the age of 34, I came back to Virginia to care for my mother, who died shortly after my return. As the last of my family passed, I turned my lens to old friends, and their new families. I photographed the house in which I grew up. The man that lives there now houses snakes in my father's old office, and rests them in my old bedroom, while he changes their cages. My mother always promised that there were no snakes in my room, and now that she is gone, there are.

These photographs are not meant to be purely autobiographical, but rather representations of how I view things, based on my own experiences, and those of the people that I have met along the way. My boyfriend Michael, stands on the street I grew up on, bridging the gap between past and present. Lynn, the first stranger that ever sat for me, continues to pose for me, along with her son Max. 
I have been photographing her for seventeen years now.

Photo report's insight:

Susan Worsham  was born in Richmond Virginia. She took her first photography class while studying graphic design in college.  In 2009 Susan was nominated for the Santa Fe Prize For Photography, and her book ” Some Fox Trails In Virginia” won first runner up in the fine art category of  the Blurb Photography Book Now International Competition. In 2010 Susan was awarded the first TMC / Kodak Film Grant, and was an artist in residence at Light Work in Syracuse, New York. Her work has been shown at the Corcoran Museum during FotoWeek D.C, LOOK3 Festival Of The Photograph, The Lishui Photo Festival in China, and most recently at the Danville Museum in Virginia. Susan was named one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers To Watch in 2011, and was included in Photolucida's Critcal Mass Top 50.

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The Staff Club in Cardiff | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz

The Staff Club in Cardiff | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Glamorgan County Council Staff Club was a pub in the city centre of Cardiff, on Westgate street. That old red brick corner building just in front of the Millennium Stadium. We called it the Staff Club. You could go there and always see someone you know. A special place and a second home for many of its customers.

 

The pub was suddenly closed in October 2007 after almost 50 years of operation. At that time, the club was selected by the Cardiff branch of the Campaign for Real Ale as the club of the year and had about 6000 members, the vast majority employees and ex-employees of the city council. All attempts and hopes to reopen it failed and in the end of 2008, a year from its closure, the building was sold to a company that planned to open a trendy club or music venue there.

 

In 2012 the place reopened finally and now it hosts a modern fashionable bar".- Maciej Dakowicz

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Poagao | Street photographer: TC Lin

Poagao | Street photographer: TC Lin | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
照相因為太簡單, 所以並不容易...Taking pictures is hard, not because there's so little beauty in the world, but because it's everywhere, in all scales, sizes, shapes and colors, up and down, front and...
Photo report's insight:

I was born on Christmas, more or less raised in the US, and immigrated to Taiwan in 1989. I've been a shoe inspector in Chinese factories, a TV news cameraman, and a conscripted soldier in the Taiwanese army. I write books, make films and play trumpet in a jug band. At present I'm an editor.

Throughout all of this I also take pictures, though I don't go out of my way to shoot any certain thing; my photos are simply things I see. But I would go insane if I didn't have photography to bring me and the world into some kind of understanding.- 

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