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Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui

Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Homes in the village of Denganmal in western India do not have running water. The only drinking water comes from two wells at the foot of a hill outside the village. The well is often so crowded that the walk and wait can take hours in the sweltering heat.

Photo report's insight:

"I am a television news correspondent turned photographer, working for Reuters in Mumbai. I was brought up in the Indian capital Delhi but have been posted in Mumbai since summer 2010. With Reuters, I made my foray into professional photography. I've been learning something new about photography everyday on the job. Apart from taking pictures to go with the daily news, I have a keen interest in shooting in depth features and multimedia."- Danish Siddiqui

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Bangladesh child marriage | Photojournalist: Allison Joyce

Bangladesh child marriage | Photojournalist: Allison Joyce | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of child marriage in the world. Around 29 percent of girls are married before the age of 15, and 65% of girls are already married by the time they turn 18. Families are often in a hurry to marry their daughters off, because girls are thought of as an economic burden. Education is considered unnecessary for girls, because boys get the jobs and bring the money in.

Child marriage is both physically and psychologically damaging. Girls who are forcibly married at a young age are more likely to experience domestic abuse than their unmarried peers and many girls report their first sexual experience is forced. A girl of 15 is five times more likely to die in childbirth than a woman in her twenties.

Allison Joyce, an American photojournalist based in Bangladesh, travelled to a rural area in Manikganj District, west of the capital, and photographed a wedding between a 15-year-old girl and a 32-year-old man.

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Crista K. Banks's curator insight, September 7, 2015 9:57 PM

In the larger cities of these countries child marriage and being bonded has been outlawed, however there are so many people in the rural areas continuing old "traditions." Many times, people in the rural areas do not even know the laws and the problem is compounded because there is noone from the the law there to make sure these practices are being stopped. 

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BAM – New Hope | National Geographic photographer: Elena Chernyshova

BAM – New Hope | National Geographic photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

A railway is not just tracks, trains, bridges, tunnels and stations. As with any ‘road’, it cannot function without the people who have built it, who are maintaining it and travel along it.

The legendary BAM railway (Baikal-Amur Mainline) traverses Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East about 600-700 km north of the Trans-Siberian railway. It stretches for thousands of kilometres and represents many decades of history – from its development by Gulag prisoners, followed by its construction by Komsomol (Communist Youth), through to the years of Perestroika and post-Soviet abandonment.

 

Historically BAM was unlucky. It was Brezhnev’s pet project. The Soviet government succeeded in mobilising hundreds of thousands of young people for its construction. Some were attracted by high salaries or the opportunity to get a sought-after car, whereas others came looking for adventure. The Soviet Union collapsed two years after the opening of the line. Prospects of economic and industrial development of rich deposits of Eastern Siberia got buried for decades. A newly constructed railway became “well forgotten”.

 

Currently life along the railway is stagnant. Without rail and industrial development, there is no future for its cities and villages. All hopes are being pinned on the ‘BAM-2′. The main part of the BAM railway has just a single track with many railway sidings. This limits its through capacity. The Russian Railways (RZD) is looking to double the traffic volume by 2017. The second track is crucial to the plans of industrial development of the region. This program is called ‘BAM-2′. 512 billion roubles have been allocated for its reconstruction.

Next stop? - Elena Chernyshova

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Clipping Path India's curator insight, March 9, 2016 5:32 AM

A railway is not just tracks, trains, bridges, tunnels and stations. As with any ‘road’, it cannot function without the people who have built it, who are maintaining it and travel along it.

The legendary BAM railway (Baikal-Amur Mainline) traverses Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East about 600-700 km north of the Trans-Siberian railway. It stretches for thousands of kilometres and represents many decades of history – from its development by Gulag prisoners, followed by its construction by Komsomol (Communist Youth), through to the years of Perestroika and post-Soviet abandonment.

 

Historically BAM was unlucky. It was Brezhnev’s pet project. The Soviet government succeeded in mobilising hundreds of thousands of young people for its construction. Some were attracted by high salaries or the opportunity to get a sought-after car, whereas others came looking for adventure. The Soviet Union collapsed two years after the opening of the line. Prospects of economic and industrial development of rich deposits of Eastern Siberia got buried for decades. A newly constructed railway became “well forgotten”.

 

Currently life along the railway is stagnant. Without rail and industrial development, there is no future for its cities and villages. All hopes are being pinned on the ‘BAM-2′. The main part of the BAM railway has just a single track with many railway sidings. This limits its through capacity. The Russian Railways (RZD) is looking to double the traffic volume by 2017. The second track is crucial to the plans of industrial development of the region. This program is called ‘BAM-2′. 512 billion roubles have been allocated for its reconstruction.

Next stop? - Elena Chernyshova

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LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014

LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
LIVING UNNOTICED13 February 2013

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has no law that makes homosexuality illegal in the country, but there is no societal acceptance for it, which makes the idea of equal treatment under the law a fantasy. Gay people there often choose to remain hidden to protect themselves from physical danger and social stigmatization. At this point, there is almost no legal support for the gay community outside the occasional gesture from international sources and NGOs.

 

Rainbow Sunrise was founded in 2011 by Joseph Saidi, 26, to support the gay community in the city of Bukavu in the eastern DRC. Progress is slow due to a lack of funds, but the organization plays a critical role for local gay men and women, providing free HIV testing, condoms, sexual education, and perhaps most importantly, a safe place to share their personal struggles with others, without having to feel ashamed, rejected, or judged.

 

Saidi was attacked and jailed for several days in May 2013: “When I was in prison, I spent two days without food or drink. I was tortured, and I was raped by three inmates. I suffered from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. I was discriminated against based on my sexual orientation. I was beaten by inmates. I thought I was going to die because since my birth I've never been subjected to such treatment.”

 

Photo report's insight:
TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
SHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 320F-STOP: 2.0FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mm  
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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:45 AM

agregar su visión ...

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Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti

Kiev en feu | Photos Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lorsque la capitale ukrainienne a sombré dans la violence après plusieurs semaines d'un bras de fer entre forces de l'ordre et manifestants pro-européens, le 22 janvier 2014,  les affrontements du centre-ville, notamment sur la place de l'Indépendance ont pris l'allure d'un champ de bataille cinématographique. 

 

Jamais la presse n'avait reçu des photographies aussi "belles" et "picturales". La photographie la plus emblématique qui a fait le tour du monde, est celle du photographe Andrey Stenin de l'Agence RIA Novosti.

Photo report's insight:

Autres photos sur le site du Monde : 
http://www.lemonde.fr/europe/visuel/2014/01/23/la-semaine-ou-kiev-s-est-embrasee_4353592_3214.html ;

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Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich

Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Curtis "Rebel" Rageur sits on the bow, hat backwards, eyes watchful. He gives a thumbs-down to Julius Gaudet, 62, letting him know that the line they set the day before is in the water. Julius pulls the boat to a stop near the shore of Shell Island, Louisiana as Rebel searches for the line with his gaff. He finds it, pulling hand-over-fist, as if reeling in a large fish. With a splash, the reptilian head emerges suddenly from the water and Julius leans over the edge, putting one 9mm round through it's brain. The two hunters pull their prey into the boat, tag it and toss it onto the deck, which will soon be stacked high with the rest of the day's haul. Rebel turns to me, wiping blood onto his pants, and with a smile says, "And that's how we do the gator dance." 

 

The state of Louisiana is home to the largest alligator population in the United States, estimated to be almost 2 million. Alligators are North America's largest reptiles and are considered a renewable resource in an industry that has thrived in America's deep south for centuries. The first large alligator harvests occurred during the early 1800s. During the Civil War, alligator skins were used to make shoes and saddles for confederate troops. The alligator farming industry in Louisiana alone annually harvests 140,000-170,000 gators which are valued at over $12,000,000.  - Matt Eich

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Alessandro Zanini's curator insight, February 9, 2014 9:16 AM

Cacciatori di alligatori in Louisiana. 

 

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$1.2 million jury verdict in the Morel v. AFP copyright infringement case

$1.2 million jury verdict in the Morel v. AFP copyright infringement case | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
©DANIEL MORELOne of the eight images by Daniel Morel of the aftermath of the January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake that was distributed without permission by AFP and Getty Images.

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"Photographer Daniel Morel says his decisive victory in court last week against Agence France Presse (AFP) and Getty images was not only vindication for him, but a victory for all photographers trying to eke out a living in the digital age.

A federal jury awarded Morel $1.2 million in damages after determining that both agencies willfully infringed his copyrights in 2010 by distributing eight of his exclusive news images of the Haiti earthquake without permission. 

"I hope the internet is going to be a little safer now for all artists, all photographers," he told PDN the day after the jury reached its verdict.

Morel also said he took personal satisfaction in defeating the teams of lawyers from AFP and Getty that he has been fighting for nearly four years." - PDNONLINE

- See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/news/Morel-v-AFP-Copyrig-9598.shtml#sthash.0OsQzG6D.dpuf"

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Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta

Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I went to Jakarta’s business district to find photos of middle-class workers returning to their homes. When I had finished, I realized that I had something different to shoot for the next day. I searched Google maps to find the location of the collapsed bridge but I couldn’t find the exact location. There was a blank map with only the name of the village, Sanghiang Tanjung. Surprisingly, it said the village was just 130 kms (80 miles) away from our Jakarta office – a travel time of about two hours. My estimation was it would take 4 hours.

 

3am Thursday morning, my friend and driver Soewarno and I headed to the village. We reached by 6am. But the difficulty was this village was just a blank area on the map. Also, we had to find the right direction that the students would take, so that I could take a pictures from the front, not from the back. We found many roads in the village but no one knew where the bridge was. With the help of my friends, we were able to get the name of the head of the village, Epi Sopian, who accompanied us to the location. Edi said the bridge collapsed during Saturday’s big flood when wood and bamboo hit the suspension bridge’s pillar.

 

I arrived at the location as the students were crossing. They were already in the middle of the bridge. Oh no, these could not be the children who wanted to go to school, I thought! It was more like an acrobatic show the collapsed bridge as an apparatus and without any safety device at all. They walked slowly, sometimes screaming as their shoes slipped. Suddenly the rain came. A last group of students, Sofiah and her friend, were on the bridge. Happily, all the students crossed safely. I took pictures for no more than five minutes. (...)

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Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez

Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Violence and death are always present and tangible in Guatemala. The population seems to accept it as normal, even more so when women are the victims. In many cases, society simply ignores it, sits in silence or turns a blind eye.

 

Many men treat women as if they have no rights, thinking it unusual that someone should be punished or fined for beating, raping or killing them.

In Guatemala, violence against women generally starts behind the walls of their own homes. The aggressors in most cases are the men closest to them: fathers, brothers, cousins and partners.

 

There are now laws to protect women but there is little education, information or willingness to report crimes. The male perpetrators themselves often don’t seem to understand why they are being arrested. Prosecutors told me that they often hear from men accused of such crimes: “Why am I being arrested? I only hit my wife.” - Jorge Dan Lopez 



Photo report's insight:

"I was born in Guerrero State, in southern Mexico, a depressed region with large indigenous population. I began to take photos when I moved to Mexico City in the year 2000. After several courses in the capital I traveled to Italy in 2002 to live and photograph for diverse media until 2006. That year, one of great political and social change in Mexico, I returned to work for a financial newspaper and began with Reuters in 2008. I've been in Guatemala for Reuters since June of 2011." - Jorge Dan Lopez

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Bibi Aisha | Photographer: Jodi Bieber

Bibi Aisha | Photographer: Jodi Bieber | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Bibi Aisha (Pashto: بی بی عایشه‎; Bibi is a term of respect meaning "Lady"; born Aisha Mohammadzai, legal name Aesha Mohammadzai) is an Afghan woman whose mutilated face appeared on the cover of Time magazine in summer 2010. Her story first appeared in the Daily Beast in December 2009, which prompted doctors to write in offering to help her. The Grossman Burn Foundation in California pledged to perform reconstructive surgery on her and began organizing for her visa in the early spring of 2010. Diane Sawyer of ABC News also covered her ordeal in March 2010.

 

In a practice known as baad, Aisha's father promised her to a Taliban fighter when she was 12 years old as compensation for a killing that a member of her family had committed. She was married at 14 and subjected to constant abuse. At 18, she fled the abuse but was caught by police, jailed, and returned to her family. Her father returned her to her in-laws. To take revenge on her escape, her father-in-law, husband, and three other family members took Aisha into the mountains, cut off her nose and her ears, and left her to die. Bibi was later rescued by aid workers and the U.S. military. Some sources disputed the role of any members of the Taliban in her mutilation at the time it happened.

Aisha was featured on an August 2010 cover of Time magazine and in a corresponding article, "Afghan Women and the Return of the Taliban."

The cover image generated enormous controversy.

 

 The image and the accompanying cover title, "What Happens if We Leave Afghanistan," fueled debate about the merits of the Afghan War.

The photo was taken by the South African photographer Jodi Bieber and was awarded the World Press Photo Award for 2010. The image of Aisha is sometimes compared to the 'Afghan Girl' photograph of Sharbat Gula taken by Steve McCurry.

Shortly after Time's cover ran, Aisha was flown to the United States to receive free reconstructive surgery.

 

In May 2012 CNN.com ran an article about Aisha's activity. Since coming to the United States in August 2010, surgeons concluded she is mentally incompetent to handle the patient responsibilities in the surgical recovery regimen. Her psychologist, Shiphra Bakhchi, diagnosed her with borderline personality disorder, which may have been innately pre-existing throughout her life. She was taken in by the Women for Afghan Women shelter in Queens, New York and has subsequently moved to a family situation in Maryland.

 

The May 2012 CNN article by Jessica Ravitz explored the challenges faced by Aisha during her integration into a globalized world. "[S]he's been passed around by well-meaning strangers, showcased like a star and shielded like a fragile child," Ravitz reports. Its focus on Aisha as an autonomous person, rather than a poster child, serves as a portrait of the difficulties faced by trauma survivors and those that assist them.

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Shane and Maggie | Photo story: Sara Naomi Lewkowicz

Shane and Maggie | Photo story: Sara Naomi Lewkowicz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I've been a photojournalist for several years, and currently am in my first year of graduate school at Ohio University. My first semester at Ohio University has been one of the single most challenging periods of my career, and I can safely say I have worked harder than I have ever worked in my life. One of my biggest challenges came in November, when a story I had been documenting for several months took a very dark turn.

 

I had been photographing a couple, Shane and Maggie, since September. I had originally intended the story to focus on the difficulties felons face once being released from incarceration. My intention was to paint a portrait of the catch-22 many individuals find themselves in upon release, the metaphorical prison of a stigma they can never seem to escape. The story changed dramatically when one night, Shane and Maggie got into a fight. Shane began to physically abuse Maggie, slamming her up against walls and choking her in front of her two-year-old daughter, Memphis. He had possession of our cellular phones, so I reached into his pocket and steal my phone back when he was distracted. I handed my phone to another adult who was in the house,and instructed them to call the police. I then continued to document the abuse.

 

In that moment, my instincts as a photojournalist kicked in. I knew I had to stay with the story and document it in all of its ugly truth. I have continued to follow Maggie since the abuse, and am producing a multimedia piece as well as a still series. I plan on applying for several grants to continue working on this project and broadening its scope. I've also begun working closely with Donna Ferrato, who will be including my piece in Unbeatable, a project that spans her three-decade career documenting domestic violence. 

 

The biggest part of this whole upsetting situation that has made the difference has truly been Maggie. Her courage through this whole ordeal, especially considering her age, is extraordinary. She has asked me to move forward with this project and to tell her story, because she feels that the photographs could potentially help someone escape from the same type of situation she was in. "Women need to understand this can happen to them. I never thought it could happen to me, but it could," she told me. "Shane was like a fast car. When you're driving it, you think 'I might get pulled over and get a ticket.' You never think that you're going to crash." 

 

While this story is, in part, about domestic violence, it is not a reportage on a domestic dispute—it is not a news event. It seeks to take a deeper, unflinching look into the circumstances that transform a relationship into a crucible, and what happens before, during, immediately proceeding and long after an episode of violence takes place. With this story, it is my goal to examine the effects of this type of violence on the couple, the absued, the abuser, and the children who serve as witnesses to the abuse. We typically only see victims of abuse in the hours or days after having been abused. I have been able to spend time with Maggie and her children before, during, and after the assault. My next step is to travel to Alaska, where Maggie currently resides with her husband and the father of her children, and examine the long-term effects of this incident on her current relationship, on her children, and on her own sense of self. - Sara Naomi Lewkowicz

Photo report's insight:

On June 25, 2013, Sara Naomi Lewkowicz won the 2013 Ville de Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award for her work documenting Domestic Violence, to be awarded later this year at Visa Pour l’Image in Perpignan.

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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, September 20, 2013 11:58 AM

Real life photo work. Impressive! 

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INVISIBLES | Photojournalist: Giuseppe Carotenuto

INVISIBLES  | Photojournalist: Giuseppe Carotenuto | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Rome. In the centre of Rome on the doorstep to historical Porta Pia in a district between diplomatic bases and billionaire houses, live in a complete state of humanitarian emergency 140 somali people, for whom Italian Government has recognize a sort of international protection. Their night shelter is in the building of ex Somali embassy in via Villini, 9 where they live without drinkable water, without heating, electricity between mouses and foulness.

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1st prize singles, Paul Hansen| World Press Photo 2013

1st prize singles, Paul Hansen| World Press Photo 2013 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
GAZA BURIAL20 November 2012

Gaza City, Palestinian Territories

Two-year-old Suhaib Hijazi and his older brother Muhammad were killed when their house was destroyed by an Israeli missile strike. Their father Fouad was also killed and their mother was put in intensive care. Fouad’s brothers carry his children to the mosque for the burial ceremony as his body is carried behind on a stretcher.

Photo report's insight:
TECHNICAL INFORMATIONSHUTTER SPEED: 1/800 secISO: 400F-STOP: 5FOCAL LENGTH: 16 mmCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark III
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Photographer of the Year 2015 | Photojournalist: Jonas Gratzer

Photographer of the Year 2015 | Photojournalist: Jonas Gratzer | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Originally from Stockholm, Gratzer has been living in Bangkok with his wife and son since 2009. He has travelled throughout south-east Asia and the Indian subcontinent, focusing on rights issues such as child labour, human trafficking and women's rights, as well as environmental concerns. He has recently become a Getty Images contributor.

He said: "With my pictures I try to make people aware of what the daily struggle faced by millions of people across the continent. There are so many sides of Asia that are not pleasant. My major concern for the region is that corporations are eating up Asia and spreading like cancer. Many leaders in powerful positions turn a blind eye to what's happening in this part of the world. There is a sort of philosophy of 'money first and what happens next is not our concern.'"

Photo report's insight:

More photos of Jonas Gratzer at: http://www.jonasgratzer.com/

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BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson

BEFORE THEY PASS AWAY | Photographer: Jimmy Nelson | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The wigmen of the Huli people aren’t like Western toupee manufacturers. They are wizards who only work with people who have fine heads of hair. What a traditional wigman does is use ancient magic to make hair grow faster than normal so it can be cut off and turned into a wig. Evidently, magic – like hair restorer – doesn’t work if the hair is long gone." - Jimmy Nelson

Photo report's insight:

Jimmy Nelson is a British photojournalist and photographer known for his portraits of tribal and indigenous peoples. 

 

In 2009 Nelson started to work on his biggest project to-date, Before they Pass Away. He travelled for 3 years and photographed more than 35 indigenous tribes around the world in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, and the South Pacific, using a 50-year-old 4x5in camera.[5] Nelson said that the project was "inspired by Edward Sheriff Curtis and his great photographs of Native Americans". The tribes that Nelson photographed include the Huli and Kalam tribes of New Guinea, the Tsaatan of Mongolia and the Mursi people of the Omo River valley in southern Ethiopia. Jimmy borrowed the funds from a Dutch billionaire, Marcel Boekhoorn.

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Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


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World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST

World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
2014 PHOTO CONTEST

The World Press Photo of the Year 2013 is a picture by American photographer John Stanmeyer.

Judging
An international jury of leading professionals in the field of photojournalism worldwide began judging the entries at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam on 1 February.

Results
The results of the 2014 World Press Photo Contest were announced on 14 February. The prize-winning pictures will be presented in a year-long exhibition that travels through more than 100 cities in over 45 countries, to start in Amsterdam in De Nieuwe Kerk on 18 April 2014.

Prizes
The jury awarded first, second and third prizes in nine categories. First-prize winners receive a cash prize of €1,500. The premier award carries a cash prize of €10,000. In addition, Canon will donate a professional DSLR camera and lens kit to the author of the World Press Photo of the Year 2013. The annual Awards Days, a two-day celebration of the prizewinners, takes place in Amsterdam on 24 and 25 April 2014.

Photo report's insight:
View the entire collection of winning images from the 57th World Press Photo Contest. The winners were selected from more than 90,000 images submitted to the contest. 
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Seven minutes only for portrait of François Hollande | Photographer :Marco Grob

Seven minutes only for portrait of François Hollande | Photographer :Marco Grob | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On Friday, January 31, we arrived at the Élysée Palace in Paris to photograph the French President François Hollande for TIME’s cover. We prepared four different set ups: A black background, a white background and two locations within the palace that would make for strong environmental shots. The key on a shoot like this is to be really well prepared. My crew moves like a ballet, so the portrait session kind of has this flow.

When the president walked in, he was pressed for time. After initial introductions, I normally don’t interact much, so the relationship is between the subject and the camera. This gives me a much more authentic picture.

 

We only had seven minutes to make the two different studio portraits, one of those ended up on the cover of TIME International. I was also able to sneak in the two environmental pictures, which both ran in the magazine.

There are different ways to get a good portrait. There are a lot of photographers who have a much different approach. But my subjects often don’t have time to get used to the fact that they’re being photographed. Which probably adds some immediacy.



Read more: Meeting François Hollande: Behind TIME’s Cover with Marco Grob - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2014/02/06/francois-hollande-time-cover/#ixzz2suxaeGU9


Photo report's insight:

More about great job of Marco Grob: http://www.marcogrob.com/work

Marco Grob is a contract photographer for TIME. He previously photographed major figures from the civil rights movement for One Dream, TIME’s multimedia commemoration of the 1963 March on Washington and the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. 


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Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com

Iconic photo of Afghan girl almost wasn’t published | Video on TODAY.com | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Vidéo about Steve McCurry. Photographer Steve McCurry is known for his dramatic pictures, but the most famous shot he’s ever taken, a striking image of an Afghan girl, almost never got seen.

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Lighted Path's curator insight, December 13, 2013 9:48 PM

The story behind the image of the iconic Afghan girl and the photographer who took the shot.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, December 15, 2013 12:31 PM

Historias detrás de las fotografías en un libro del escritor Steve McCurry como por ejemplo la tan conocida de la chica Afgana de ojos claros.

Michel Prisca's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:46 PM

do I remember this Picture from the national geograpic Magazine??

 

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Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.

Photo report's insight:

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 13, 2014 5:09 AM

Police corruption in india

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Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez

Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The clock on the wall marked four in the morning. It was a cold and wet Saturday in July, but I was sitting in the warm offices of El Salvador’s Red Cross. Suddenly, the relative calm and silence in the emergency unit was interrupted when the phone rang. The loud noise made me jump. The phone operator said: “What is your name? If you don’t identify yourself, we can’t help you.”

 

I went to the operator and asked him what was happening. He said that there had been a report of a woman who had been beaten, raped several times and then left for dead in a ditch. He said that they would take her to hospital because of the severity of her injuries and I asked to go along.

 

When I got to where she had been found, I saw a woman dressed in a baby blue dress that was dirty all over, with a face disfigured by the blows she had received. She was disoriented and her gaze seemed lost in a void. She kept on repeating that her name was Claudia (...) - Ulises Rodriguez

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India stray dogs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

India stray dogs | Photographer:  Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

English:
"No country has as many stray dogs as India, and no country suffers as much from them. Free-roaming dogs number in the tens of millions and bite millions of people annually, including vast numbers of children. An estimated 20,000 people die every year from rabies infections — more than a third of the global rabies toll."

 - Serge BouvetFrançais: 
"Chaque année, 30.000 personnes meurent chaque année de la rage en Inde (70% des décès dans le monde) à cause de la morsure de chiens parias. Il est estimé qu’en Inde, une personne meurt de la rage à tous les 30 minutes. Environ 70% des victimes sont des enfants de moins de 15 ans."- Serge Bouvet

 

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:34 PM

So sad to see and hear how many stray dogs there are. I was very surprised when I read that India has more stray dogs than most. I would have thought differently, but even with the number of stray dogs I would definitely want to be cautious about knowing the boundaries in abusing/wanting to stop rabies from spreading. Although no one can really stop dogs from breeding and having more puppies, it would be important to maybe start a free vet clinic for the dogs that are in need. I mean by looking at the photo right there, its very sad to see what is going on. Although, I know that it is a struggle already for people in India to feed there families, imagine how the animals are trying to feed for there own. So sad. 

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Witness to a Massacre in a Nairobi Mall | Photojournalist: Tyler Hicks

Witness to a Massacre in a Nairobi Mall | Photojournalist: Tyler Hicks | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Tyler Hicks, a Times photographer, was nearby when gunmen opened fire on an upscale Kenyan mall.
Photo report's insight:

" I was at a framing shop in an adjacent mall picking up some photographs that had been given to me as gifts by photojournalists who attended my wedding. I was very close. I didn’t have all of my equipment, just had a small camera that I always have with me in case something happens.

I ran over to the mall and I was able to photograph until my wife [Nichole Sobecki], who is also a photojournalist and was at our house, was able to collect my Kevlar helmet and professional cameras before she came to cover the news herself.

Tyler Hicks/The New York TimesPolice and soldiers swept through the mall to pursue the assailants and to help civilians escape to safety.

When I left the framing shop, I could see right away that there was something serious going on, because there were lots of people running away from the mall. I ran over there and within minutes I could see people who had been shot in the leg or stomach from what appeared to be small arms fire being helped by other civilians. This went on for about 30 minutes.

The mall is Nairobi’s most high-end shopping center, completely up to Western standards, with movie theaters, nice cafes, supermarkets and a casino. Pretty much anything you need. I’ve been there, so I knew the layout inside.

From the beginning I wanted to get with some security forces inside the mall.

Tyler Hicks/The New York TimesGlass was shattered inside the mall.

We managed to find an entrance where people who were hiding inside the mall were coming out. We ran into that service entrance and we hooked up with some police who let us stay with them as they did security sweeps clearing different stores — very much like what you see when the military enters a village. Shop to shop and aisle to aisle, looking for the shooters who were still inside." - Tyler Hicks

 
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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, September 24, 2013 9:55 AM

Photos from Nairobi Mall. Not easy to watch, but the photos are good.

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Life for Rent | Photojournalist: Gmb Akash

Life for Rent | Photojournalist: Gmb Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Night is the meaning of life here. Don’t dare to feel I am talking about moonlit night. It’s about a place where fluorescent bulbs hesitate to light up the great darkness.  You have to go step by s...
Photo report's insight:

'Fighting over getting men at night does not change relationship between themselves on the day. An unknown bonding for each other has tied them up and takes care of them in dear need. That’s why, when a girl out of frustration cut her full hand with blade just to torture herself, her roommate wipe it off and put medicine on it. A six feet by six feet room is world for 3-4 girls, so when customer leave they decorate the bed with flowery bed sheet or place artificial flower for adding beauty of it. Knowing a home never will come in their life still they care for their small room as like their house' - GMB Akash 

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Voodoonville | Photojournalist: Paolo Marchetti

Voodoonville | Photojournalist: Paolo Marchetti | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Haiti, Port-au-Prince, at the end of Cite Soleil (the heart of PAP) is one of Haiti’s largest landfill, Here, a slum named Warf Jeremy was born, the final frontier of humanity for the Haitian people. There is no reliable census to calculate the exact number of the inhabitants of Waff, but the logistical support of many NGOs in recent years have counted hundreds of thousands of people living in precarious style, without any support from the state. The desperation and the great faith of this people reflect the value of life, a final bulwark in support of such suffering.

 

The Voodoo is a religion with African American characters syncretic and highly esoteric, one of the oldest in the world. The current religion Vuduista combines elements taken from the bustling traditional African practiced before colonialism, with concepts drawn from Catholicism. Today, Voodoo is practiced by about sixty million people around the world. In Haiti it is practiced by almost the entire population. The Voodoo tradition has gone through three centuries of persecution and misinformation and has been strongly discredited, many rumors and misinformation have promoted a general vision that is very distorted. - Paolo Marchetti

 

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