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Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez

Opening a blind eye to femicide | Photojournalist: Jorge Dan Lopez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Violence and death are always present and tangible in Guatemala. The population seems to accept it as normal, even more so when women are the victims. In many cases, society simply ignores it, sits in silence or turns a blind eye.

 

Many men treat women as if they have no rights, thinking it unusual that someone should be punished or fined for beating, raping or killing them.

In Guatemala, violence against women generally starts behind the walls of their own homes. The aggressors in most cases are the men closest to them: fathers, brothers, cousins and partners.

 

There are now laws to protect women but there is little education, information or willingness to report crimes. The male perpetrators themselves often don’t seem to understand why they are being arrested. Prosecutors told me that they often hear from men accused of such crimes: “Why am I being arrested? I only hit my wife.” - Jorge Dan Lopez 



Photo report's insight:

"I was born in Guerrero State, in southern Mexico, a depressed region with large indigenous population. I began to take photos when I moved to Mexico City in the year 2000. After several courses in the capital I traveled to Italy in 2002 to live and photograph for diverse media until 2006. That year, one of great political and social change in Mexico, I returned to work for a financial newspaper and began with Reuters in 2008. I've been in Guatemala for Reuters since June of 2011." - Jorge Dan Lopez

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GANGSTERISM the coloured hidden subculture – Photographer: Gianmarco Panucci

GANGSTERISM the coloured hidden subculture – Photographer: Gianmarco Panucci | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Gangs in the Cape Flats started to appear in 1966, when District Six and other zones situated in the center of the town were declared "whites-only" areas, due to the apartheid regime. Coloured people living in those areas were forced to move to the Cape Flats after their houses had been destroyed.

Double and three storey flats, overcrowding, poverty, high crime rates, drugs and alchol abuse are some of the elements that started to charaterize these communities. Beacuse of the poverty many young people join the gangs by the attraction of money and power, and many times also for protection.

Innocent men, women and children have knowingly or not become entangled with gangsters, most have suffered dearly as a result. Many still bear the scars of their involvement. Countless others have lost their lives, usually in a savage manner and sometimes caught in a crossfire.

There are about 20 coloured townships in Cape Town, situated between 10 and 20 kilometers from the center of town, all of them are dangerous. Each area could have more than one gang, then the area becomes divided into territories. The gang fights happen over the control of those territories and for the drug sale.

Sometimes youth who are friends at school are enemies outside because of the gangs of the territory were they are living. Gangsterism between coloured people is considered as a culture, so strongly rooted within these communities.

Photo report's insight:

Although gangsters and slums have been photographed often, the photographer managed to get so close to the people of this world that they become more than just gangsters. They become vulnerable people, just like any of us. 
– Ineke Smits & Thomas Dworzak

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Living proof | Photographer: David Alan Harvey

Living proof | Photographer: David Alan Harvey | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

 

 

Hip hop, which first began on the streets of the South Bronx in the early 1970s, has traveled the globe, finding a home in every corner of the planet. Remade by local cultures in their own language and regional style, hip hop's versatility speaks to its accessibility and universality. The lyrics, the look, and the lifestyle could easily be a cultural anthropologist's best example-or worst nightmare-of America's influence and cultural dominance.

In 2005, Magnum Photographer David Alan Harvey began photographing local emcees in the Bronx River Projects, home of hip hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa, whose legendary Zulu Nation parties of the 70s inspired a new generation of b-boys and b-girls. It is their descendants that Harvey has captured in Living Proof, a glimpse into hip hop in its many forms.

Boogie Down thugs Uptown and Ruckus, unsigned artists whose lyrics are presented here, became Harvey's trusted friends and self-appointed guides, bringing him inside their homes, their families, and their lives. Harvey soon realized that the code of the streets would bring one of three fates: jail, death, or success. And so he traveled from the ''hood" to Hollywood, gaining access to Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, and Nelly-artists who went through the system and came out kings. Keepin' it real becomes a little surreal when gold records and semi-automatics mix like gin and tonics. 

Going global to document the regional manifestations of a culture a mere three decades in existence, Harvey discovered conversations with DAM in East Jerusalem sounded just like the ramble with Uptown and Ruckus. Hip hop, for all its pop-pop-pop, for all it's and ya don't stop, for all its rise to the top, has always been about speaking to the guy on the corner and the girl at the club-because skills and styls come from a hard love.

Photo report's insight:

David Alan Harvey is a Magnum Photographer based in New York City. He has published three major books, Cuba, Divided Soul and Living Proof. He is publisher and editor of BURN Magazine.

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Yakuza | Photographer: Anton Kusters

Yakuza | Photographer: Anton Kusters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"YAKUZA is a personal visual account of the life inside an inaccessible subculture: a traditional Japanese crime family that controls the streets of Kabukicho, in the heart of Tokyo, Japan.

Through 10 months of negotiations with the Shinseikai, my brother Malik and I became one of the only westerners ever to be granted this kind of access to the closed world of Japanese organized crime."

"With a mix of photography, film, writing and graphic design, I try to share not only their complex relationship to Japanese society, but also to show the personal struggle of being forced to live in two different worlds at the same time; worlds that often have conflicting morals and values. It turns out not to be a simple ‘black’ versus ‘white’ relationship, but most definitely one with many, many, many shades of grey." (Anton Kusters)

 

Anton Kusters is a Belgium-based photographer specializing in long-term projects. In 2011, he published his first photobook on the Yakuza, the Japanese organized crime families, that he photographed for two years.

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