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Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui

Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Homes in the village of Denganmal in western India do not have running water. The only drinking water comes from two wells at the foot of a hill outside the village. The well is often so crowded that the walk and wait can take hours in the sweltering heat.

Photo report's insight:

"I am a television news correspondent turned photographer, working for Reuters in Mumbai. I was brought up in the Indian capital Delhi but have been posted in Mumbai since summer 2010. With Reuters, I made my foray into professional photography. I've been learning something new about photography everyday on the job. Apart from taking pictures to go with the daily news, I have a keen interest in shooting in depth features and multimedia."- Danish Siddiqui

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Texas Saigon | Photographer: Hahn Hartung

Texas Saigon | Photographer: Hahn Hartung | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The Vietnam War ruled 30 years of the country’s history in the 20thcentury. US Military invaded between 1965 and 1973 and sent hundreds of thousands of US soldiers into the war. The excuse was to prevent a Communist takeover of the whole country which was divided into the communist North, and the pro-American South. In1975 the North won the war and the last Americans left the country.

Forty years after the war there are no more foreign troops in the country but platoons of tourists visiting the old battlefields and tunnels excavated by Viet-Cong guerillas. There is a market selling old military stuff and even faking it. The Defoliation Spray called “Agent Orange” is still affecting the people and causes disabilities. During the war US Airforces dropped 7 million tons of bombs on Vietnam and there are still remaining bombs and landmines below ground. Even though America lost the war, capitalism finally triumphed and the remains of the war serve its prosperity. So we are looking at a country that has just opened up and the new generation is being exposed to a growing Western influence.

Roughly 40 years after the conflict ended, the absurdity of war and its consequences are more obvious than ever. - Hahn Hartung

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Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi

Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On a hot afternoon in June 2008, Italian photographer Alessandro Vincenzi jumped in to a black and yellow taxi, headed to a deserted parking lot meant for trucks. It was his last day in Mumbai. Normally accompanied by his local fixer, Anil, who was unavailable on this particular day, Vincenzi decided to spend the rest of his day wandering with his camera. After about 40 minutes in the taxi, Vincenzi reached the park and saw an old and abandoned warehouse; he asked the driver to wait outside while he went into the building.

Once inside, there was almost no light and Vincenzi was unable to see much, but he continued to walk through the rooms, following the few voices he could hear in the distance. “After few seconds I felt something strange under my feet, as if I was walking on the top of a mattress,” Vincenzi explained to me. A few moments later when Vincenzi looked at the ground, he realized that he was treading upon a bed made of condoms; in the corner, there was an actual mattress with a transgender woman standing on it. As she began to approach him, Vincenzi realized that he was mistaken for a ‘client’ and explained, using his camera, that he was only a photographer. Once she understood, they both walked away and returned to work, not minding each other’s presence...

 

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REK | Photographer: Juuke Schoorl

REK | Photographer: Juuke Schoorl | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With 'Rek' (stretch in Dutch) I explore the aesthetic possibilities of the human skin through a mixture of image capturing techniques. By manipulating this curious stretchable material with various low budget materials like nylon fishing rope and cello tape I am able to temporarily shape it into surprising textures and shapes. Highlighting not only it’s flexibility and adaptability but also it’s function as our own biological upholstery that aside from it’s protective capabilities could also serve as a medium for aesthetic expression, possibly in the form of a dress less fashion.- 

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Heidi Spencer's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:32 AM

I chose this website because, this photographer "Juuke Schoorl" have very clear pictures that i could use as a good example of a good picture taken by a great photographer.

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BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

New York City-based photographer Mark Hartman spent most of March and April 2014 in India working on personal projects, including these images from his series “Bole Sol Nihang” portraits of Nihang Sikhs. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab Region in 1469 by the Guru Nanak. There are now 26 million Sikhs living around the world, making it the world’s fifth largest religion. Nihang Sikhs, also known as the “eternal army,” are the army of the 10th Guru of the Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind Singh.

 

The Nihangs and all Sikhs believe all people should have the right to practice any religion and follow any path they choose. Nihangs are known for their fearlessness, bravery and successful victories in battle, even when heavily outnumbered. According to Hartman, their way of life has not changed for more than 300 years, living a “nomadic, spiritual life” that is “unattached to the world.” Thanks to what he calls his “magic powers,” Hartman was granted access to this unique group of Sikhs while he was traveling in Amirtsar and Anandpursahib, in Northern India, Punjab.

 

“I have not seen anyone set up on-location portraits of the Nihang Sikhs,” Hartman writes about the work. “My curiosity and interest in their philosophy fueled my desire to learn more about them, and inspired me to create the work. My favorite photos of them were made well-over 100 years ago. I felt a necessity to make images of them in modern times. I have always loved the portrait work of August Sander and Edward Curtis. Their work is about the subject; nothing else. I choose to photograph these people in a similar, very straightforward manner, working within my vision. I isolated the subject, set up the scene and composition while interacting with the subject, and finally photographed the subject.”

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/05/26787#gallery-6

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Steve McCurry on photography's globalised challenge | Phaidon

Steve McCurry on photography's globalised challenge |  Phaidon | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Steve McCurry, the brilliant Magnum photographer, is forever travelling the globe. So it's probably best to pay attention when he talks about how the world is changing. In an interview with the US website, American Photo, based around his latest book, Untold: The Stories Behind the Photographs, the photographer laments the planet's growing homogeneity.

He explained to the magazine that, when in Atlanta late last year, he went out looking for a high-density neighbourhood, like those found in Brooklyn or Queens, in which to shoot some pictures. "But nobody really walks there," he marveled. "It's like LA. There's virtually no pedestrian traffic unless you're somewhere like Sunset Blvd."

This narrowing of aesthetic diferences is something that Steve has noticed the world over. "When I walk through an airport, I think, 'This is the future.' All airports look the same. They're steel and glass. You walk through a shopping mall in India and it could be in Cleveland. There's almost no difference."

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In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“My first inspirations were world-changers like James Nachtwey, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry. I firmly believe that photography has a role to play in provoking thought, spurring dialogue, and prompting action—therein being a potentially potent ingredient in an antidote to social evils.

“Photographs are informative, a record of what we do and value, and contribute important subjective testimonies for history.

 

That said, worldwide trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with over 700,000 women moved across international borders annually. It is not at all realistic to imagine photos making any substantial dent to improve this situation. The photos I take will do little to directly improve the lives of women and children in Sonagachi.

 

“To do this would take massive political, economic and legal overhauls, not to mention years of reshaping social values. This was one of my hardest realizations when following apparently humanistic callings. That images can, however, give people a voice and better inform a public debate, is some journalistic consolation. What makes it immediately worthwhile for me is the experience of earning an individual’s trust, and for a while, touching lives, sharing stories and learning from each other in a dignified, respectful, curious manner. This is the only honest thing I can convince people of offering them, and surprisingly it is also what seems to open the most doors for me.” - Souvid Datta

Photo report's insight:

Mumbai-born photographer Souvid Datta is a young man of 21 whose age puts him somewhere in between the subjects he’s been documenting in the infamous red-light district of Kolkata, India and the subjects’ children. His series, In the Shadows of Kolkata, portrays a close-knit group of female sex workers, a few of their clients, and their children. Exploring the lives of sex workers as a photographic “theme” never fails to affect, and seeing children interspersed into this work adds another layer of difficult material to digest, question, process

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Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta

Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I went to Jakarta’s business district to find photos of middle-class workers returning to their homes. When I had finished, I realized that I had something different to shoot for the next day. I searched Google maps to find the location of the collapsed bridge but I couldn’t find the exact location. There was a blank map with only the name of the village, Sanghiang Tanjung. Surprisingly, it said the village was just 130 kms (80 miles) away from our Jakarta office – a travel time of about two hours. My estimation was it would take 4 hours.

 

3am Thursday morning, my friend and driver Soewarno and I headed to the village. We reached by 6am. But the difficulty was this village was just a blank area on the map. Also, we had to find the right direction that the students would take, so that I could take a pictures from the front, not from the back. We found many roads in the village but no one knew where the bridge was. With the help of my friends, we were able to get the name of the head of the village, Epi Sopian, who accompanied us to the location. Edi said the bridge collapsed during Saturday’s big flood when wood and bamboo hit the suspension bridge’s pillar.

 

I arrived at the location as the students were crossing. They were already in the middle of the bridge. Oh no, these could not be the children who wanted to go to school, I thought! It was more like an acrobatic show the collapsed bridge as an apparatus and without any safety device at all. They walked slowly, sometimes screaming as their shoes slipped. Suddenly the rain came. A last group of students, Sofiah and her friend, were on the bridge. Happily, all the students crossed safely. I took pictures for no more than five minutes. (...)

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La transfiguration du banal dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet

La transfiguration du banal dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dans le domaine du business, ne perdons pas de vue que la vente d’un magazine est surtout régie dans nos sociétés occidentales par un levier marketing singulier : l’idéal de beauté. Cela ne date pas d’hier. Je ne souscris pas totalement à cette analyse, mais force est de constater que dans le jeu de la séduction, l’artifice est roi. Dans le secteur du business, il coexiste deux cas d’écoles : l’une prône l’artifice dans la communication visuelle quand la seconde cultive la sobriété. A vous d’en estimer le potentiel selon la charte de la société pour laquelle vous travaillez.

 

"On est comme ça. Nous témoignons par nos aspirations naïves vers la majesté superlative des formes artificielles, d’une certaine répugnance à ce qui est trop réel.

Je considère les artifices comme l’indice d’une appétence pour l’idéal évoluant dans notre esprit au-dessus de tout ce que la vie naturelle y accumule de trop terre à terre, comme une déformation sublime de la nature.

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Façonner la lumière avec des filtres de couleur | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet

Façonner la lumière avec des filtres de couleur | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Un petit retour d’expérience

Ah que l’automne parisien est… terne ! Il est 13h00 ou 18h00, on ne sait plus. Quand on a un ciel de suie pareil en début d’après-midi, notre horloge biologique part en sucette. Alors, quand la voûte céleste est si plombée, pommelée, ou d’ardoise, que faire ? Eh bien, à défaut de prendre un ticket pour le soleil de la côte d’azur avec votre sujet, on s’adapte. On sort les flashs et les boîtes à lumière4 et on tente de faire au mieux.


Pour la photographie, j’utilise deux types d’ampoules : à spirale 5000K BIG ou halogène.  Remontons dans le temps. Par le passé, j’avais acheté des boîtes à lumière qui utilisaient des lampes halogène dit « studio-projection »  de la marque OSRAM, 1000Watts, une température de couleur (T°=3400 K)  assez proche de celle du Tungstène (T°=3200 K).  Au début, malgré ma balance des blancs, mes photos étaient toutes orangées et j’en était fort désappointé. C’est dans le domaine de la vidéo que j’ai compris l’origine de cette anomalie5. J’ai appris que lorsque la température de couleur diffère pour deux sources d’éclairage ou entre une source d’éclairage et le médium utilisé pour enregistrer les images.  Il fallait le savoir.


L’éclairage tungstène affiche une température de couleur inférieur à celle de la lumière du jour. La lampe produit une dominante orangée que je dois alors compenser en y plaçant un filtre bleu devant la source d’éclairage. 

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Les Visages des Puces | Photographer: Andrew Kovalev

Les Visages des Puces | Photographer: Andrew Kovalev | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen, located in the suburbs of Paris, is the biggest and one of the oldest flea markets in the world. It is said, that the expression “flea market” itself originates from here. It is a conglomerate of 14 smaller markets, each with its own features and speciality. It is a part of the cultural and historical heritage of France and a place of great touristic interest. Most importantly, it is a sophisticated social organism, a vast community of people who are passionate about their very special craft.

 

The goal of this project is to document the look and the spirit of the place in showing its face and soul. To show incredible diversity of its parts, which are merging together in one entity, while remaining the separate worlds.

 

This series portrays the people of The Market. Those, who live and work there, who actually create, preserve and change the place throughout its years and decades.



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LETTER FROM AFGHANISTAN | Photojournalist: AARON HUEY

LETTER FROM AFGHANISTAN | Photojournalist: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"In the main square in Tirin Kot, the capital of Uruzgan Province, in central Afghanistan, a large billboard shows a human skeleton being hanged. The rope is not a normal gallows rope but the stem of an opium poppy. Aside from this jarring image, Tirin Kot is a bucolic-seeming place, a market town of flat-topped adobe houses and little shops on a low bluff on the eastern shore of the Tirinrud River, in a long valley bounded by open desert and jagged, treeless mountains.

 

About ten thousand people live in the town. The men are bearded and wear traditional robes and tunics and cover their heads with turbans or sequinned skullcaps. There are virtually no women in sight, and when they do appear they wear all-concealing burkas. A few paved streets join at a traffic circle in the center of town, but within a few blocks they peter out to dirt tracks.

 

Almost everything around Tirin Kot is some shade of brown. The river is a khaki-colored wash of silt and snowmelt that flows out of the mountain range to the north, past mud-walled family compounds. On either side of the river, however, running down the valley, there is a narrow strip of wheat fields and poppy fields, and for several weeks in the spring the poppies bloom: lovely, open-petalled white, pink, red, and magenta blossoms, the darker colors indicating the ones with the most opium."


Full text of article: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/07/09/070709fa_fact_anderson

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Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu

Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As smoking regulations in North America get stricter, the number of smokers, especially among younger generations, are in decline. If Mad Men taught us anything, it’s that smoking is not nearly as common as it used to be. In some circles, it can even be seen as taboo. Considering these changing habits of North Americans, it’s incredibly startling to see the recent series by Toronto based photographer Michelle Siu. For Marlboro Boys, she travelled to Indonesia to document the shocking reality of young smokers.

It’s easy to begin smoking when it’s presence is everywhere. As the fifth largest tobacco market in the world, Indonesians are bombarded with ever-present advertising targeting youth and easy access to cheap cigarettes (about one dollar a pack). The industry is closely tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. What’s most alarming, is that the habit is forming early. According to a recent study, the number of children smokers aged 10 to 14 has doubled over the past 20 years, and has tripled for those ages five to nine.

Photo report's insight:

"Indonesia’s relationship with tobacco is complex. Cheap cigarettes, ubiquitous advertising, a powerful lobby with tight political connections and lack of law enforcement fuels a national addiction. 

 

Indonesia holds one of the world’s highest rates of male smokers and it often begins at a young age. Boys are growing up in an environment where demand for tobacco is strong and foreign tobacco giants such as Marlboro maker Philip Morris, are establishing themselves as smoking rates decline in other countries. 

 

With the fifth largest tobacco market internationally, the industry is tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. Indonesia remains one of the few countries that has not joined the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control of the World Health Organization which aims “to protect present and future generations from the devastating health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke.” 

 

Young smokers begin the cycle of addiction but at a health cost for generations to come. The juxtaposition of young boys smoking like seasoned addicts is jarring yet this project is intended to not only shock and inform viewers but to demonstrate the lack of enforcement of national health regulations and to question the country’s dated relationship with tobacco." - MICHELLE SIU

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WOMEN | Fashion photographer: Greg Kadel

WOMEN | Fashion photographer: Greg Kadel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Greg Kadel is a US born fashion photographer and filmmaker based in New York. Born and raised in Pennsylvania, Kadel moved to NY to study marine biology and fine art. Upon completion of his studies, he discovered his passion for photography and film making and for nearly a decade, Greg has been creating influential images that have graced the pages of Allure, Harper's Bazaar, i-D, Italian Vogue, Japanese Vogue, L'uomo Vogue, Numero, Visionaire and Vogue China. He has also been an image maker for the likes of Biotherm, Diane Von Furstenburg, Elie Tahari, Hermes, H&M, Lancome, Loewe, Louis Vuitton, L’Oreal, Max Mara, Oscar de la Renta, Shiseido, Valentino, Victoria’s Secret, and Salvatore Ferragamo.


His images have been described as “classic with a modern flair” and he is respected for his unique ability to bring the best out of his subjects. He currently spends his time working between New York, Paris and Los Angeles.

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He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page

He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
He Led the CIA to bin Laden—and Unwittingly Fueled a Vaccine Backlash. Pakistani doctor's role in health campaign sparked local suspicions that efforts to fight polio were part of a Western plot.
Photo report's insight:

PESHAWAR, Pakistan—In his native Pakistan, Dr. Shakil Afridi is considered a traitor by many people for helping the Central Intelligence Agency track down and kill Osama bin Laden. In the United States, he is hailed as a hero.

 

In global health circles, his story is a cautionary tale about the consequences that can spiral out of control when health professionals get too close to intelligence operations.

More than three years after U.S. Navy SEALs raided bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, it remains unclear whether Afridi knew he was working for the CIA when he led a hepatitis B vaccination campaign that helped U.S. agents learn where bin Laden was hiding.

Afridi's wife and his current lawyer, Qamar Nadeem Afridi, who is the doctor's cousin, say that he didn't know of the CIA connection, and U.S. intelligence specialists say that even if he did know, Afridi almost certainly had no idea that the man whose location he helped to identify was the world's most wanted terrorist.

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Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova

Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

The documentary was held in Norilsk between February 2012 and February 2013.
The documentary was supported by the Lagardère foundation grant for photography.

« Days of Night – Nights of Day » is about the daily life of the inhabitants of Norilsk, a mining city northernmost of the polar circle with a population of more than 170 000.  The city, its mines and metallurgical factories were constructed by prisoners of the Gulag.  With 60% of the present population involved in the industrial process, this documentary aims to investigate human adaptation to extreme climate, ecological disaster and isolation.
Norilsk is the 7th most polluted city in the world.  The average temperature is -10C, reaching lows of -55C in winter, when for two months the city is plunged into polar night.
The living conditions of the people of Norilsk are unique, making their plight incomparable. - Elena Chernyshova

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Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Few kilometers from the border of India, German photographer Karolin Klüppel discovered the tiny, isolated village of Mawlynnong where ‘girls rule the world’. Made up of only 92 dwellings in the East Khasi Hills, the town uniquely operates as a matrilinear society, each family’s lineage traced through the surname of the wife instead of the husband. The result is a culture where female descendants are most crucial to the continuing bloodline and the youngest daughter inherits all family property. Fascinated by this rare singularity, Klüppel spent 6 months with the Mawlynnong women to create Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls).

Along with the privilege of carrying the family name, girls are expected to take on many responsibilities at a very young age, often caring for 3 generations under one roof. As early as 8 years old, Mawlynnong females can run the entire household and tend to their younger siblings single handed. Despite their isolation from the modern world and a plethora of familial duties, the girls of Mawlynnong experience a life of freedom and reverence all their own.

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Monica Matteuzzi's curator insight, October 6, 2014 7:23 AM

For "the project "Mädchenland" Küppel spent six months in the village of Mawlynnong where people of the Khasi form the majority of the population. The Khasi are a matrilineal society. Here, traditionally it is girls who are of particularly importance and who play an exposed role in the family.

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Children of the Omo | Photographer: Steve Mc Curry

Children of the Omo | Photographer:  Steve Mc Curry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia. It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley, with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. "


" The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley live without clean drinking water and without medical care. It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued. " 

 

" Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer,  learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture. " - Steve McCurry

Photo report's insight:

More information: http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

agregar su visión ...

JackPreguiss's curator insight, March 12, 2015 4:42 PM

um trabalho , onde envolve sensibilidade , este fotografo STEVE MCCURRY, trabalha não só com sua câmera , mais com seus sentimentos e com o sentimento do sujeito fotografado , é maravilhoso, ele consegue registrar não só o físico ... como também a alma da pessoa.

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Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich

Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Curtis "Rebel" Rageur sits on the bow, hat backwards, eyes watchful. He gives a thumbs-down to Julius Gaudet, 62, letting him know that the line they set the day before is in the water. Julius pulls the boat to a stop near the shore of Shell Island, Louisiana as Rebel searches for the line with his gaff. He finds it, pulling hand-over-fist, as if reeling in a large fish. With a splash, the reptilian head emerges suddenly from the water and Julius leans over the edge, putting one 9mm round through it's brain. The two hunters pull their prey into the boat, tag it and toss it onto the deck, which will soon be stacked high with the rest of the day's haul. Rebel turns to me, wiping blood onto his pants, and with a smile says, "And that's how we do the gator dance." 

 

The state of Louisiana is home to the largest alligator population in the United States, estimated to be almost 2 million. Alligators are North America's largest reptiles and are considered a renewable resource in an industry that has thrived in America's deep south for centuries. The first large alligator harvests occurred during the early 1800s. During the Civil War, alligator skins were used to make shoes and saddles for confederate troops. The alligator farming industry in Louisiana alone annually harvests 140,000-170,000 gators which are valued at over $12,000,000.  - Matt Eich

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Alessandro Zanini's curator insight, February 9, 2014 9:16 AM

Cacciatori di alligatori in Louisiana. 

 

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1503 | Fine art photographer: CHRISTIAN TAGLIAVINI

1503 | Fine art photographer: CHRISTIAN TAGLIAVINI | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With his already legendary series »1503« Christian Tagliavini invites the viewer to a time travel to the 16th century. His protagonists bear names such as Cecilia, Lucrezia or Bartolomeo, they are gracile, graceful or mighty and all of them express the pride of the Renaissance. In the style of the Florentine Agnolo di Cosimo, in art history better known as Bronzino, Tagliavini gives the patina of Mannerism to his modern sitters. The title of the series »1503« is also a reference to Bronzino’s year of birth.

 

The artist does not only stages the image space or places the light. The accurate spadework of each portrait is an inalienable foundation for the accomplished work that attracts the recipient. From the casting over the design of the dresses through to the makeup, Tagliavini is the indicatory player in every single operating procedure. The universal artist creates a piece of art that is the result of this creative process – the traces of them meet up in the final work and culminate in something sublime.

 

By doing so, the artist perfectly succeeds in the challenge of citing art history without simply copying it. Finally, with a productive period of more than 13 months the series »1503« has become an impressive testament of the visionary creative richness of the avant-gardist Christian Tagliavini. 

Photo report's insight:

Born in 1971, Christian Tagliavini grew up in Italy and Switzerland. He had studied graphic design and worked as an architect and graphic artist before he focused on photography art in 2000. Additional fine arts such as architecture, graphic design or drawing have influenced his art until today. His biographic background also shaped his understanding of art to invent and construct works. His works cannot only be seen as images, they are complex pieces of art, which have their roots in different materials. Tagliavini’s creative work is mostly mirrored in series that tell stories, offer multifaceted quotes or which are the result of an unusual contemporary concept. His works have been exhibited in numerous exhibitions and art fairs worldwide. Christian Tagliavini, who was honoured with the Hasselblad Masters Award in 2012, lives and works in Switzerland today.

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Rob Vonmeulen's curator insight, January 8, 2014 8:08 AM

Back to 1500 .... 

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Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez

Courage in the face of brutality | Photournalist: Ulises Rodriguez | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The clock on the wall marked four in the morning. It was a cold and wet Saturday in July, but I was sitting in the warm offices of El Salvador’s Red Cross. Suddenly, the relative calm and silence in the emergency unit was interrupted when the phone rang. The loud noise made me jump. The phone operator said: “What is your name? If you don’t identify yourself, we can’t help you.”

 

I went to the operator and asked him what was happening. He said that there had been a report of a woman who had been beaten, raped several times and then left for dead in a ditch. He said that they would take her to hospital because of the severity of her injuries and I asked to go along.

 

When I got to where she had been found, I saw a woman dressed in a baby blue dress that was dirty all over, with a face disfigured by the blows she had received. She was disoriented and her gaze seemed lost in a void. She kept on repeating that her name was Claudia (...) - Ulises Rodriguez

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Dark Isolation, Tokyo | Photographer: Salvi Danes

Dark Isolation, Tokyo | Photographer: Salvi Danes | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

There is an undeniable nucleus of initial interest, a question that from the occidental perspective is easy to think about. How does a society really live, each of its members, in a human and social organization which is apparently exemplary and with an enviable lifestyle? There is a feeling that despite enjoying all the comforts of a modern society, the inhabitants of Tokyo are far away from what was, conventionally, understood as an ideal of happiness.

It is easy to find oneself isolated and alone among a crowd. Enjoying the comfort and economic safety is not a synonym of complete personal realization. A frenetic pace of life can ruin any personal initiative and any possibility of creative life.

From this clash, I could observe a dislocation of the people of this huge metropolis, as if they did not strike a balance between feeling isolated and alone among the crowd.

To sum up, the paradox was solved in a manifestation of solitude, in a great distress, in a sensation of individual frustration. Was that possible to detect and turn it into images? A difficulty due to the fact that I had to face up a perception of a completely subjective and debatable reality. It is not easy to show the breathlessness of the Taboo, the passive attitude or the nightmare of routine.—Salvi Danes

Photo report's insight:

Salvi Danes is a Spanish photographer based in Barcelona, Spain. His work has been honored by the Lucie Foundation, Sony World Photography, IPA, and many others. This work is from his series, Dark Isolation: Tokyo.

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Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet

Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nothing better reflects the strangeness of a people than the environment in which he lives. So I decided to import a part of India in Europe, framed in a bus shelter or ad showcase to create an open-air museum. Sometimes it coexists funny interaction between the two dimensions. These photos are a poetry of Rajasthan." - Serge Bouvet

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Not in vain | Photographer: Christina Paige

Not in vain | Photographer: Christina Paige | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Christina is a graduate of the International Center of Photography's program in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism. She was chosen as one of Photo District News's 30 Emerging Photographers for 2008, where she was described as finding "grace and bits of humor swirling in the maelstrom of everyday life." Before becoming a photographer, she worked as a clinical social worker with Spanish-speaking communities in California and Massachusetts. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.

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