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Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui

Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Homes in the village of Denganmal in western India do not have running water. The only drinking water comes from two wells at the foot of a hill outside the village. The well is often so crowded that the walk and wait can take hours in the sweltering heat.

Photo report's insight:

"I am a television news correspondent turned photographer, working for Reuters in Mumbai. I was brought up in the Indian capital Delhi but have been posted in Mumbai since summer 2010. With Reuters, I made my foray into professional photography. I've been learning something new about photography everyday on the job. Apart from taking pictures to go with the daily news, I have a keen interest in shooting in depth features and multimedia."- Danish Siddiqui

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L’histoire de Bilji, le Hijra de Kathputli Colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe

L’histoire de Bilji, le Hijra de Kathputli Colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Les bracelets roses de Bilji s’entrechoquent lorsqu’elle allume sa deuxième cigarette. Elle tire une taffe. Engoncée dans son pashmînâ pourpre qu’elle ne porte que pendant les fraîcheurs matinales, Bilji fait figure d’un chef sioux. Un chef sioux orné de bijoux de femmes.
Des volutes de fumée de tabac remontent à la surface de ses souvenirs.

« J’appartenais à la « famille » Kinar Bhadur Gad.» raconte Bilji en tapotant de son gros index noueux sa cigarette pour en faire tomber la cendre.
« J’ai rejoint le foyer de mon guru-ji, quand j’avais 16 ans. Mes parents ne m’ont pas retenu quand je suis parti rejoindre ma nouvelle famille. »

La plupart des habitants du bidonville sont issus d’une grande famille originaire du Rajasthan. Bijli est née à New Delhi. Son père, d’origine modeste, faisait bouillir la marmite familiale en vendant du thé.

 

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Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita

Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

"Serge Bouvet first went to India in 2012 with the plan to make a photo project about the hijras – a term used in Southeast Asia to define transgender people. But while documenting this story he discovered something else: the openness and beauty of the Muslim community living in the Turkman Gate old city in Delhi. Bouvet decided to photograph the Muslim men he met. And I talked to him about this project, about how he got the idea and about the way he approaches the people he photographs."- Bianca Olivia Nita

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Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi

Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On a hot afternoon in June 2008, Italian photographer Alessandro Vincenzi jumped in to a black and yellow taxi, headed to a deserted parking lot meant for trucks. It was his last day in Mumbai. Normally accompanied by his local fixer, Anil, who was unavailable on this particular day, Vincenzi decided to spend the rest of his day wandering with his camera. After about 40 minutes in the taxi, Vincenzi reached the park and saw an old and abandoned warehouse; he asked the driver to wait outside while he went into the building.

Once inside, there was almost no light and Vincenzi was unable to see much, but he continued to walk through the rooms, following the few voices he could hear in the distance. “After few seconds I felt something strange under my feet, as if I was walking on the top of a mattress,” Vincenzi explained to me. A few moments later when Vincenzi looked at the ground, he realized that he was treading upon a bed made of condoms; in the corner, there was an actual mattress with a transgender woman standing on it. As she began to approach him, Vincenzi realized that he was mistaken for a ‘client’ and explained, using his camera, that he was only a photographer. Once she understood, they both walked away and returned to work, not minding each other’s presence...

 

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Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova

Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

The documentary was held in Norilsk between February 2012 and February 2013.
The documentary was supported by the Lagardère foundation grant for photography.

« Days of Night – Nights of Day » is about the daily life of the inhabitants of Norilsk, a mining city northernmost of the polar circle with a population of more than 170 000.  The city, its mines and metallurgical factories were constructed by prisoners of the Gulag.  With 60% of the present population involved in the industrial process, this documentary aims to investigate human adaptation to extreme climate, ecological disaster and isolation.
Norilsk is the 7th most polluted city in the world.  The average temperature is -10C, reaching lows of -55C in winter, when for two months the city is plunged into polar night.
The living conditions of the people of Norilsk are unique, making their plight incomparable. - Elena Chernyshova

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REK | Photographer: Juuke Schoorl

REK | Photographer: Juuke Schoorl | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With 'Rek' (stretch in Dutch) I explore the aesthetic possibilities of the human skin through a mixture of image capturing techniques. By manipulating this curious stretchable material with various low budget materials like nylon fishing rope and cello tape I am able to temporarily shape it into surprising textures and shapes. Highlighting not only it’s flexibility and adaptability but also it’s function as our own biological upholstery that aside from it’s protective capabilities could also serve as a medium for aesthetic expression, possibly in the form of a dress less fashion.- 

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Heidi Spencer's curator insight, February 4, 8:32 AM

I chose this website because, this photographer "Juuke Schoorl" have very clear pictures that i could use as a good example of a good picture taken by a great photographer.

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The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe

The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For The Shepherd’s Realm: Volume III, photographer Andrew Fladeboe captures New Zealand’s courageous working dogs, tracing the historical threads that connect them to the verdant farms and steep hills of the country’s South Island.

 

Fladeboe has dedicated the last few years of his career to chronicling the millennia-long bond fostered between man and dog. Canines, he explains, have been by our side for more than 30,000 years, ensuring not only our prosperity but also our survival. In New Zealand in particular, herding dogs have been a crucial part of the cultural landscape since border collies emigrated from Scotland during the 19th century, and until fifty years ago, the sheep industry was New Zealand’s leading enterprise.

 

The artist explains that although working dogs are rarely petted or allowed inside, they do share a close friendship with the farmers who have trained them. Herding dogs are most often border collies of huntaways, a breed native to New Zealand, and they are bred and raised to be deeply in tune with the farmers. They can comprehend seven whistled commands and often can anticipate the wishes of the shepherd with whom they work side-by-side.

 

 

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Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Few kilometers from the border of India, German photographer Karolin Klüppel discovered the tiny, isolated village of Mawlynnong where ‘girls rule the world’. Made up of only 92 dwellings in the East Khasi Hills, the town uniquely operates as a matrilinear society, each family’s lineage traced through the surname of the wife instead of the husband. The result is a culture where female descendants are most crucial to the continuing bloodline and the youngest daughter inherits all family property. Fascinated by this rare singularity, Klüppel spent 6 months with the Mawlynnong women to create Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls).

Along with the privilege of carrying the family name, girls are expected to take on many responsibilities at a very young age, often caring for 3 generations under one roof. As early as 8 years old, Mawlynnong females can run the entire household and tend to their younger siblings single handed. Despite their isolation from the modern world and a plethora of familial duties, the girls of Mawlynnong experience a life of freedom and reverence all their own.

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Monica Matteuzzi's curator insight, October 6, 2014 7:23 AM

For "the project "Mädchenland" Küppel spent six months in the village of Mawlynnong where people of the Khasi form the majority of the population. The Khasi are a matrilineal society. Here, traditionally it is girls who are of particularly importance and who play an exposed role in the family.

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For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay

For Fortune Cookie/Photographer: Le Pinch Martin Tremblay | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Fortune Cookie, photographer Martin Tremblay, also known as Pinch, turns the fashion world upside down, literally. As part of a shoot commissioned by London-based Schön! Magazine, he captures models floating, their heads planted on an overturned floor. Though the planet is jarringly inverted, normal life continues unchanged while fantastical female muses clad in Dolce & Gabbana, Marie Saint Pierre, and Givenchy adapt to a reverse gravitational pull. Here, the world of fashion and the mundanities of the everyday exist both in harmony and in conflict, moving in opposite directions and yet unified under a single, vibrant aesthetic.

Fortune Cookie was researched over the course of two years and created with more than one hundred and sixty hours of meticulous retouching in collaboration with Visual Box. Styling was done by Pascal & Jérémie. In this magical realm, the imaginative mind runs free, suspending rational thought if only for a moment. 

Photo report's insight:

To see Fortune Cookie  : Click on "Fashion" button, then "Editorial" and "Fortune Cookie"

 

Gear: Canon 5D MARK II

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Claudia Fano's curator insight, February 5, 3:24 PM

This is a creative way of showing conflict and unity in the world of fashion.

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Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"La photo est une trace." De mon auguste bouche, l'affirmation pourrait passer pour un truisme barbant. Le rappel d'une telle évidence est pourtant un fondamental dans la photographie. Dans le sujet que je vous propose, cette trace est celle de la rencontre. Cette dernière exprime une relation entre le photographe et son sujet. Je vous suggère donc de bien réfléchir à la pose à faire prendre que vous indiquerez à vos sympathiques sujets. Un manque d'exigence à la prise de vue risquerait de produire un portrait manquant de force affective.

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Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"For the past three decades as I traveled the world on assignment I
have witnessed children working in fields, factories, ditches, tunnels, mines, and ship-breaking yards. The scope of the problem is vast. Hundreds of millions of children spend their  childhood working and do not have an opportunity to play, go to school, or live in a healthy environment." - Steve McCurry

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

agregar su visión ...

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Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


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SINGH | Photographers: Amit and Naroop

SINGH | Photographers: Amit and Naroop | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Amit and Naroop are London-based photographers specialising in music and advertising, but their latest series Singh is focused on a portraits of a very different kind. Taking the most powerful symbols of the Sikh faith, the pair have photographed a group of British Sikh men from all walks of life, and focusing on the traditional turban and beard, celebrated them in all of their diverse fashions.

They explain: “Many religions determine the way their followers look, but none have such a dramatic and definite ‘look’ as Sikhism. And yet, with 30 million Sikhs in the world, there are almost as many ways to wear the turban and beard as there are Sikhs…The men who feature in this project are businessmen, boxers, IT professionals, doctors, fashion stylists, temple volunteers, magicians and a host of other occupations all adapting and interpreting the Sikh traditions in their own way.”

Photographed with all of Amit and Naroop’s characteristic bright colours, glamour and polished finish, the series is an admiring portrait of the changing face of tradition in the UK. Lovely!

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Paula Silva's comment, March 3, 2014 11:57 PM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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Made in Bangkok | Photographer: ZACKARY CANEPARI

Made in Bangkok | Photographer: ZACKARY CANEPARI | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

To kick off 2015 let's time travel back to 2014.  This is Bangkok.  The city is sinking into the flood lands it was built on.  Someday soon the roads will be rivers.  But that hasn’t stopped the expansion.  Megacity.  The exurban and suburban zones are nearly as dense as the city center.  Building and rebuilding.  Old and new structures competing for skyline.  Some resemble robots.  Some remain unfinished.  The elevated Skytrain connects them all.  Down below the infrastructure sags.  Progress and tradition.  Congestion edging towards permanent gridlock.  None of the cars, buses, trucks, tuk-tuks, motorcycles, ferry boats, river taxis, scooters and bicycles move at all. 

 

Most people wear hospital masks on the street, pulling them aside to slurp noodles or smoke a cigarette.  The air is thick with humidity and sweat and smog and sex.  Inside, everything is Megamall. Climate controlled consumption.  Medical tourism.  Sex tourism.  Drug tourism.  Displays telling you how to look and how to feel. Massive electronic billboards advertise for dental surgery.  Written in Thai.  In Chinese.  In English.  In Neon.  Screens above and screens below.  Reflections in the puddles, on the windows, in the eyes.  Projections.  Personalized.  Customized.  Individualized.  Food.  Fashion.  Eye color.  Politics.  Products.  Sex.  Gender.   This is Bangkok. - ZACKARY CANEPARI

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Weusegadgets's curator insight, July 28, 11:21 AM

Great photo!!

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Transfiguration | Fine art photographer: Ben Hopper

Transfiguration | Fine art photographer: Ben Hopper | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

London-based photographer, filmmaker and artist Ben Hopper created the series 'Transfiguration' in collaboration with circus artists and dancers. Using paint and powder, photographing his subjects in almost bizarre positions, Hopper creates sculptural figures that appear more abstract than actually human.

He states: "Like a mask, the layers of body paint and powder disguise the identity and release something animalistic from within." You can see much more images of the series over on his Blog, where he is also selling some prints.

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He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page

He Led the CIA to bin Laden | Photojournalist: Warrick Page | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
He Led the CIA to bin Laden—and Unwittingly Fueled a Vaccine Backlash. Pakistani doctor's role in health campaign sparked local suspicions that efforts to fight polio were part of a Western plot.
Photo report's insight:

PESHAWAR, Pakistan—In his native Pakistan, Dr. Shakil Afridi is considered a traitor by many people for helping the Central Intelligence Agency track down and kill Osama bin Laden. In the United States, he is hailed as a hero.

 

In global health circles, his story is a cautionary tale about the consequences that can spiral out of control when health professionals get too close to intelligence operations.

More than three years after U.S. Navy SEALs raided bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, it remains unclear whether Afridi knew he was working for the CIA when he led a hepatitis B vaccination campaign that helped U.S. agents learn where bin Laden was hiding.

Afridi's wife and his current lawyer, Qamar Nadeem Afridi, who is the doctor's cousin, say that he didn't know of the CIA connection, and U.S. intelligence specialists say that even if he did know, Afridi almost certainly had no idea that the man whose location he helped to identify was the world's most wanted terrorist.

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BAM – New Hope | National Geographic photographer: Elena Chernyshova

BAM – New Hope | National Geographic photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

A railway is not just tracks, trains, bridges, tunnels and stations. As with any ‘road’, it cannot function without the people who have built it, who are maintaining it and travel along it.

The legendary BAM railway (Baikal-Amur Mainline) traverses Eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East about 600-700 km north of the Trans-Siberian railway. It stretches for thousands of kilometres and represents many decades of history – from its development by Gulag prisoners, followed by its construction by Komsomol (Communist Youth), through to the years of Perestroika and post-Soviet abandonment.

 

Historically BAM was unlucky. It was Brezhnev’s pet project. The Soviet government succeeded in mobilising hundreds of thousands of young people for its construction. Some were attracted by high salaries or the opportunity to get a sought-after car, whereas others came looking for adventure. The Soviet Union collapsed two years after the opening of the line. Prospects of economic and industrial development of rich deposits of Eastern Siberia got buried for decades. A newly constructed railway became “well forgotten”.

 

Currently life along the railway is stagnant. Without rail and industrial development, there is no future for its cities and villages. All hopes are being pinned on the ‘BAM-2′. The main part of the BAM railway has just a single track with many railway sidings. This limits its through capacity. The Russian Railways (RZD) is looking to double the traffic volume by 2017. The second track is crucial to the plans of industrial development of the region. This program is called ‘BAM-2′. 512 billion roubles have been allocated for its reconstruction.

Next stop? - Elena Chernyshova

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Premier contact : gérer la première impression | Photographe: Serge Bouvet

Premier contact : gérer la première impression | Photographe: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

En photographie, je dirai même plus dans la vie tout court, la première impression va se jouer dans un laps de temps fugace, le temps d’un claquement de doigt. A l’issu de cette première impression, il sera possible ou non d’établir un lien avec votre sujet si vous êtes photographe, votre client potentiel si vous êtes un businessman ou votre futur dulcinée si vous êtes amoureux. Les rouages d’une relation sont les mêmes pour tous. En quelques lignes, je vous délivre les clés d’une prise de contact réussie. 

 

Chaque étape de la vie apporte ses leçons et elles tournent toutes autour d’une rencontre. La qualité d’un service, la puissance d’une culture d’entreprise, l’importance d’une part de marché, la communication, la qualité d’une bonne photo en ce qui me concerne à plus d’un titre, dépendent de deux facteurs : les gens et votre faculté à entrer en relation avec eux. La prise de contact n’est pas si compliquée mais demande un peu de… Oh pas grand chose… Des principes très basiques. J’ai appelé ces principes de bases : les Sésames de la convivialité.

 

Ces Sésames sont les préalables nécessaires qui vont déterminer la confiance, l’accessibilité de votre interlocuteur. La création d’un lien avec une personne suit un processus simple : la confiance se développe au niveau des instincts de base, puis le lien entre les personnalité s’établit, débouchant sur une relation qui sera le Sésame d’un monde de possibilités infinis.

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Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Brazil | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Chances are you already know Steve McCurry as the man who took one of the most iconic photos of our time. It was of a 12-year-old Afghan refugee girl who’s piercing green eyes told us her harrowing story. The image itself was named “the most recognized photograph” in the history of the National Geographic magazine and her face became famous as the cover photograph on their June 1985 issue. Beyond just that one photo, McCurry has shot over a million images spanning 35 years. More than anything, he is one of a few that has that amazing ability to capture stories of our shared human experience. As he says,


“Most of my images are grounded in people. I look for the unguarded moment, the essential soul peeking out, experience etched on a person’s face. I try to convey what it is like to be that person, a person caught in a broader landscape that you could call the human condition.”


"Looking through his large body of work, we get to experience fantastic faraway places we can only dream about visiting. It’s in his incredible photos that we feel connected to the world at large, appreciating our similarities and our differences, our cultures and our histories, and our past and our present in a truly unique and inspiring way."

 

"To develop this project, the first thing I did was simply to observe the life of people in this part of the world. Through photogenic documentation, I wanted to tell what I had seen, how the farmers grow and harvest the coffee, and their lifestyle. I tried to show their daily habits, I entered their homes and went to the plantations, I wandered through the villages and let the images scroll in front of my eyes, to tell of the faces, the stories and the atmosphere." - Steve McCurry

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Claudia Fano's curator insight, February 5, 3:17 PM

This imagination is rare i wish i could think outside the box like this painting.

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10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

La photographie est le meilleur moyen d’apprécier l’exotisme de nos voyages. A en juger d’après les photos sur les réseaux sociaux, le voyage est devenu un sujet incontournable. On n’affiche pas avec la même fierté d’évasion notre dernier voyage réalisé et le dernier achat de bien effectué. La photographie de voyage connaît malheureusement quelques écueils comme les lieux communs. La banalité n’est pas inévitable. Voici donc 20 conseils pour afficher une vision plus personnelle de la photographie de voyage.

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BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

New York City-based photographer Mark Hartman spent most of March and April 2014 in India working on personal projects, including these images from his series “Bole Sol Nihang” portraits of Nihang Sikhs. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab Region in 1469 by the Guru Nanak. There are now 26 million Sikhs living around the world, making it the world’s fifth largest religion. Nihang Sikhs, also known as the “eternal army,” are the army of the 10th Guru of the Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind Singh.

 

The Nihangs and all Sikhs believe all people should have the right to practice any religion and follow any path they choose. Nihangs are known for their fearlessness, bravery and successful victories in battle, even when heavily outnumbered. According to Hartman, their way of life has not changed for more than 300 years, living a “nomadic, spiritual life” that is “unattached to the world.” Thanks to what he calls his “magic powers,” Hartman was granted access to this unique group of Sikhs while he was traveling in Amirtsar and Anandpursahib, in Northern India, Punjab.

 

“I have not seen anyone set up on-location portraits of the Nihang Sikhs,” Hartman writes about the work. “My curiosity and interest in their philosophy fueled my desire to learn more about them, and inspired me to create the work. My favorite photos of them were made well-over 100 years ago. I felt a necessity to make images of them in modern times. I have always loved the portrait work of August Sander and Edward Curtis. Their work is about the subject; nothing else. I choose to photograph these people in a similar, very straightforward manner, working within my vision. I isolated the subject, set up the scene and composition while interacting with the subject, and finally photographed the subject.”

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/05/26787#gallery-6

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LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan

LIKE MY FATHER | Photographer: Maika Elan | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Mortality is an irrevocable fact of life, yet when inevitable reminders of it surface it can be earth shattering. When Hanoi-based photographer Maika Elan‘s father was in treatment for cancer, Elan was suddenly thrust into the role of adult during his treatment. In order to keep his spirits up during this process, Elan took her father to the same park he took her to as a child, photographing him and even playing with him as he used to with her. In her World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass project statement, Elan says, “I think it’s my turn to do something for my father, as he has done for me in the past. We both went back to the same park and played like old days. I hope these pictures I make will be a big motivation for him. I hope they let him see that he is not as sick as he feels. In my heart, he is always a happy person and full of optimism.” As of now, Elan’s father has recovered enough that he has been able to return to work. That he gets a kick out of seeing his daughter’s photos of him disseminating through the ether seems to indicate her ploy to brighten his spirits worked.

Photo report's insight:

Maika Elan (Nguyen Thanh Hai) was born in Vietnam, and lives and works in Hanoi. After taking a BA in sociology at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in 2006, Maika started to use the camera to document her daily and private life. She soon turned to professional photography, working for editorial clients and fashion firms in Vietnam. In 2010, she took up documentary photography.

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Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters

Portraits | Photographer: Dan Winters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dan Winters is an American photojournalist, illustrator, filmmaker and writer.

 

He was born in Ventura County, California on October 21, 1962. He first studied photography and the darkroom process starting in 1971 while a member of his local 4-H club. In 1979, while still a high school senior, he began working full time in the motion picture special effects industry in the area of miniature construction and design. He went on to study photography at Moorpark College, in California. After receiving an associates arts degree there, he entered the documentary studies program atLudwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany, focusing mainly on narrative photojournalism.

 

In 1986, he began his career in photography as a photojournalist in his home town in Ventura County, at the Thousand Oaks News Chronicle. After winning several local awards for his work, he moved to New York City, where magazine assignments came rapidly. In 1991, he moved to Los Angeles and married Kathryn Fouts, who became his photo rep and studio manager. In 1993, his son Dylan was born in Los Angeles. In 2000, while maintaining a home in LA, he moved to Austin, Texas. There he set up a studio outside Austin in a historic building built in 1903, that had originally served as a general store, gas station and post office for nearly 100 years before he arrived.

 

Known for the broad range of subject matter he is able to interpret, he is widely recognized for his iconic celebrity portraiture, his scientific photography, his photojournalistic stories and more recently his drawings and illustrations. He has created portraits of luminaries such as Bono, Neil Young, Barack Obama, Tupac Shakur, the Dalai Lama, Stephen Hawking, Leonardo DiCaprio, Helen Mirren, Johnny Depp, Kate Winslet, Angelina Jolie, Sandra Bullock, Brad Pitt, Steven Spielberg and Al Gore.

 

He has won over one hundred national and international awards from American Photography, Communication Arts, The Society of Publication Designers, Photo District News, The Art Directors Club of New York and Life, among others. In 1998, he was awarded the prestigious Alfred Eisenstadt Award for Magazine Photography. In 2003, he won a 1st place World Press Photo Award in the portrait category. In 2003, he was also honored by Kodak as a photo "Icon" in their biographical "Legends" series.

 

 

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Selfportrait | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Selfportrait | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On dit que la photographie et plus récemment le téléphone portable ont favorisé le boom de l’autoportrait. Sans aucun doute. Ce que moi je peux vous affirmer, c’est que l’autoportrait peut-être une agréable récréation à laquelle j’aimerai vous convier. 

Je me plais dans une photo quand j’en suis le photographe.  J’aime me photographier en très gros plan, en plan moyen, couché, assis, debout. Que l’on ne se méprenne pas sur mes intentions. Je vous vois venir avec vos gros sabots pour me sermonner sur l’égocentrisme. On se trompe sur l’autoportrait. Il se trouve à mille lieux de l’exercice narcissique. D’aucuns, bourrés de poncifs comme une dinde de Noël l’est de marrons, envisageraient l’approche de l’autoportrait comme l’avatar du divan freudien. Je ne l’ai pas assez gros sur la patate pour m’éplucher le nombril à ce point.  Faut se détendre. L’autoportrait, c’est aussi un jeu. Un moyen sympa pour s’affranchir de l’authenticité. Pour s’évader de soi. Comment ?

 

Depuis que je suis môme, j’ai toujours eu tendance à faire des grimaces devant mon miroir. Quelque part, je raillais mon image. C’est ainsi que j’aborde la pratique de l’autoportrait : comme une déconstruction ludique de soi. Un pur jeu visuel qui pousse la représentation de soi-même jusqu’à l’ironie.

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Children of the Omo | Photographer: Steve Mc Curry

Children of the Omo | Photographer:  Steve Mc Curry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia. It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley, with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. "


" The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley live without clean drinking water and without medical care. It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued. " 

 

" Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer,  learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture. " - Steve McCurry

Photo report's insight:

More information: http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

agregar su visión ...

JackPreguiss's curator insight, March 12, 4:42 PM

um trabalho , onde envolve sensibilidade , este fotografo STEVE MCCURRY, trabalha não só com sua câmera , mais com seus sentimentos e com o sentimento do sujeito fotografado , é maravilhoso, ele consegue registrar não só o físico ... como também a alma da pessoa.