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Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu

Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As smoking regulations in North America get stricter, the number of smokers, especially among younger generations, are in decline. If Mad Men taught us anything, it’s that smoking is not nearly as common as it used to be. In some circles, it can even be seen as taboo. Considering these changing habits of North Americans, it’s incredibly startling to see the recent series by Toronto based photographer Michelle Siu. For Marlboro Boys, she travelled to Indonesia to document the shocking reality of young smokers.

It’s easy to begin smoking when it’s presence is everywhere. As the fifth largest tobacco market in the world, Indonesians are bombarded with ever-present advertising targeting youth and easy access to cheap cigarettes (about one dollar a pack). The industry is closely tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. What’s most alarming, is that the habit is forming early. According to a recent study, the number of children smokers aged 10 to 14 has doubled over the past 20 years, and has tripled for those ages five to nine.

Photo report's insight:

"Indonesia’s relationship with tobacco is complex. Cheap cigarettes, ubiquitous advertising, a powerful lobby with tight political connections and lack of law enforcement fuels a national addiction. 

 

Indonesia holds one of the world’s highest rates of male smokers and it often begins at a young age. Boys are growing up in an environment where demand for tobacco is strong and foreign tobacco giants such as Marlboro maker Philip Morris, are establishing themselves as smoking rates decline in other countries. 

 

With the fifth largest tobacco market internationally, the industry is tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. Indonesia remains one of the few countries that has not joined the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control of the World Health Organization which aims “to protect present and future generations from the devastating health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke.” 

 

Young smokers begin the cycle of addiction but at a health cost for generations to come. The juxtaposition of young boys smoking like seasoned addicts is jarring yet this project is intended to not only shock and inform viewers but to demonstrate the lack of enforcement of national health regulations and to question the country’s dated relationship with tobacco." - MICHELLE SIU

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Asilo | Photographer: Greg Miller

Asilo | Photographer: Greg Miller | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Greg Miller is a photographer of human beings. Fine art, magazine and advertising photographer specializing in narrative portraiture and photography workshops.

Photo report's insight:

"30 years ago in the small Brazillian town of Caconde, in the state of Sao Paulo, construction on a large home for the elderly (asilo) was started by a local priest to alleviate conditions in the town’s already crowded facility. The structure was abandoned when the priest moved to another town. (…)

These simultaneously occurring stories are the history of small town." - GREG MILLER 

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Shannon Castor's curator insight, August 4, 2015 12:19 AM

"30 years ago in the small Brazillian town of Caconde, in the state of Sao Paulo, construction on a large home for the elderly (asilo) was started by a local priest to alleviate conditions in the town’s already crowded facility. The structure was abandoned when the priest moved to another town. (…)

These simultaneously occurring stories are the history of small town." - GREG MILLER 

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The Forgotten | Photographer: Hahn Hartung

The Forgotten | Photographer: Hahn Hartung | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

EXAMPLE OF AN AFRICAN MIDDLE-CLASS

Images from Africa in the Western media show mostly terrible misery, war, hunger and poverty. According to UN figures more than ninety percent of all Africans live neither in war nor crisis-areas and the economic growth of some African countries is among the largest in the world.

Kenya‘s economic growth is annually between five and six percent which is three times higher than the growth in Germany. This is above all to the credit of the middle class, which is probably the most crucial potential for the development of the country. Nevertheless you hardly notice anything about the lives of african middle class people. We traveled to the capital city of Kenya, Nairobi to meet and create a portray of people belonging to the middle class.

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Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi

Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On a hot afternoon in June 2008, Italian photographer Alessandro Vincenzi jumped in to a black and yellow taxi, headed to a deserted parking lot meant for trucks. It was his last day in Mumbai. Normally accompanied by his local fixer, Anil, who was unavailable on this particular day, Vincenzi decided to spend the rest of his day wandering with his camera. After about 40 minutes in the taxi, Vincenzi reached the park and saw an old and abandoned warehouse; he asked the driver to wait outside while he went into the building.

Once inside, there was almost no light and Vincenzi was unable to see much, but he continued to walk through the rooms, following the few voices he could hear in the distance. “After few seconds I felt something strange under my feet, as if I was walking on the top of a mattress,” Vincenzi explained to me. A few moments later when Vincenzi looked at the ground, he realized that he was treading upon a bed made of condoms; in the corner, there was an actual mattress with a transgender woman standing on it. As she began to approach him, Vincenzi realized that he was mistaken for a ‘client’ and explained, using his camera, that he was only a photographer. Once she understood, they both walked away and returned to work, not minding each other’s presence...

 

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Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald

Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
MIAMI har gennem årtier været et yndet tilflugtssted for vidt forskellige befolkningsgrupper. ”A melting pot of cultures” kalder de lokale byen. Kendt for at huse ældre amerikanere, de såkaldte ”snowbirds”, som flytter hertil i alderdom- men for at få opfyldt pensionistdrømmen. Og for hvert år at indvaderes af tusindvis af unge collegestuderende, som tager hertil for at feste vildt og holde Spring Break. Miami er på mange måder en slags Latinamerikas hovedstad. Ja mange mener ikke egentlig ikke, at byen er en rigtig del af USA. 70 procent af byens befolkning er hispanics og taler spansk, mens de hvide udgør en minoritet. Med solskin og varme året rundt er denne smeltedigel en speciel og tiltrækkende magnet for mange grupper: immigran- ter, der søger politisk asyl, folk, der vil opleve den amerikanske drøm, og rige, der vil nyde livet i dette dragende paradis. En ting er fælles for alle de forskellige grupper, der søger her til: De søger det gode liv.
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Children of the Omo | Photographer: Steve Mc Curry

Children of the Omo | Photographer:  Steve Mc Curry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia. It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley, with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. "


" The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley live without clean drinking water and without medical care. It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued. " 

 

" Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer,  learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture. " - Steve McCurry

Photo report's insight:

More information: http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

agregar su visión ...

JackPreguiss's curator insight, March 12, 2015 4:42 PM

um trabalho , onde envolve sensibilidade , este fotografo STEVE MCCURRY, trabalha não só com sua câmera , mais com seus sentimentos e com o sentimento do sujeito fotografado , é maravilhoso, ele consegue registrar não só o físico ... como também a alma da pessoa.

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Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich

Trouble In The Water | Photographer: Matt Eich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Curtis "Rebel" Rageur sits on the bow, hat backwards, eyes watchful. He gives a thumbs-down to Julius Gaudet, 62, letting him know that the line they set the day before is in the water. Julius pulls the boat to a stop near the shore of Shell Island, Louisiana as Rebel searches for the line with his gaff. He finds it, pulling hand-over-fist, as if reeling in a large fish. With a splash, the reptilian head emerges suddenly from the water and Julius leans over the edge, putting one 9mm round through it's brain. The two hunters pull their prey into the boat, tag it and toss it onto the deck, which will soon be stacked high with the rest of the day's haul. Rebel turns to me, wiping blood onto his pants, and with a smile says, "And that's how we do the gator dance." 

 

The state of Louisiana is home to the largest alligator population in the United States, estimated to be almost 2 million. Alligators are North America's largest reptiles and are considered a renewable resource in an industry that has thrived in America's deep south for centuries. The first large alligator harvests occurred during the early 1800s. During the Civil War, alligator skins were used to make shoes and saddles for confederate troops. The alligator farming industry in Louisiana alone annually harvests 140,000-170,000 gators which are valued at over $12,000,000.  - Matt Eich

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Alessandro Zanini's curator insight, February 9, 2014 9:16 AM

Cacciatori di alligatori in Louisiana. 

 

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In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY

In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON HUEY | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
After 150 years of broken promises, the Oglala Lakota people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota are nurturing their tribal customs, language, and beliefs. A rare, intimate portrait shows their resilience in the face of hardship. 

Almost every historical atrocity has a geographically symbolic core, a place whose name conjures up the trauma of a whole people: Auschwitz, Robben Island, Nanjing. For the Oglala Lakota of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that place is a site near Wounded Knee Creek, 16 miles northeast of the town of Pine Ridge. From a distance the hill is unremarkable, another picturesque tree-spotted mound in the creased prairie. But here at the mass grave of all those who were killed on a winter morning more than a century ago, it’s easy to believe that certain energies—acts of tremendous violence and of transcendent love—hang in the air forever and possess a forever half-life.

 

Alex White Plume, a 60-year-old Oglala Lakota activist, lives with his family and extended family on a 2,000-acre ranch near Wounded Knee Creek. White Plume’s land is lovely beyond any singing, rolling out from sage-covered knolls to creeks bruised with late summer lushness. From certain aspects, you can see the Badlands, all sun-bleached spires and scoured pinnacles. And looking another way, you can see the horizon-crowning darkness of the Black Hills of South Dakota.

 

One hot and humid day in early August, I drove out to interview White Plume in a screened outdoor kitchen he had just built for his wife. Hemp plants sprouted thickly all over their garden. “Go ahead and smoke as much as you like,” White Plume offered. “I always tell people that: Smoke as much as you want, but you won’t get very high.” The plants are remnants from a plantation of industrial hemp—low-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) Cannabis sativa—cultivated by the White Plume family in 2000.

Fuller text: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/08/pine-ridge/fuller-text ;
Photo report's insight:

Aaron Huey is a National Geographic photographer and a Contributing Editor for Harper's Magazine. He is based in Seattle, WA.

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One and a half meter | Photographer: Peter Puklus

One and a half meter | Photographer: Peter Puklus | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The title of this work refers to the radius which defines his closer environment of people. About his work he says: »I collect the portraits of the people around me. I map and document those who are close to me in one way or another (I collect memories). Slowly I will get to everybody. Relatives or friends, the important thing is that the photograph can be the symbol of my relationship to them. Or the relationship of the people in the photograph. Or that personal secret, one’s eyes may reveal. I capture a moment, the magic of which lies in trust; intimacy and photography, in other words, the story of love, friendship and identity.«

 

This project has been published in book form at Kehrer Verlag, Heidelberg, Germany.

Photo report's insight:

“Peter Puklus is an example of a modern documentary author. Questions of an involved or not involved view, an approach based on revealing beauty, or rather importance of daily, even banal things − all that was solved before. The generation of Puklus can now focus on the complexity of documentary work. Everything around can be a subject.” Zuzana Lapitkova

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Chandraprabhu Temple | Travel photograher: Serge Bouvet

Chandraprabhu Temple | Travel photograher: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Impossible de contempler les merveilles du sanctuaire de Chandraprabhu tant il y a de monde; ce sont des touristes indiens pour la plupart ou des adeptes religieux. Néanmoins, je sympathise avec les moines Jaïns qui en apprenant que je suis photographe me commande un ensemble de photos. J’accepte. J’ai rendez-vous avec eux à 5h30 du matin. Le temple est vide. Il y fait très sombre. J’ai avec moi, 4 flashs Canon Speedlite 580EX II, un réflecteur, un trépied et 50 roupies de pourboire pour les prêtres.  Je commence à photographier toutes les fresques et  Stambha (colonne sculptée) fébrilement. Je dois faire vite car à 7h00, il y aura du monde. (...)

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Mumbai Sleeping | Photography: Dhruv Dhawan

Mumbai Sleeping | Photography: Dhruv Dhawan | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I began photographing Mumbai Sleeping in the summer of 2009 to explore the diversity of a basic human experience such as sleep. I was in awe of the taxi drivers in particular who slept in such a romantic balance with their vehicles after leaving their families in the rural parts of India to make a living in the city of dreams. 

I was also motivated by the opportunity to photograph people while they are unaware of the camera and to remove the politics of the pose from my images. In this sense I liked to believe I was capturing portraits of the unconscious. 

Of the few people that awoke while I was photographing them, no one objected to my actions after I explained what I was doing. I remain ever grateful to India and its people that allow artists to capture real life without the politics of consent.

Over 350 images later I still find myself compelled to document this phenomena of urbanization in the 21st century where space has become so scarce in a city like Mumbai that 'private' acts are often conducted in public. Mumbai Sleeping is a testament to the strength and human spirit of the lower class urban population that drive the wheel of the city by day and sleep on it at night - forcing us to question whether a good night’s sleep is a luxury or a necessity.

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Debbie Lynch's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:24 PM

Dhru Dhawan's photographic investigation of the sleeping night life of Mumbai is intriguing. By exploring a basic human need, sleep, he captures  his subjects with intimacy. His motivation to "photograph people while they are unaware of the camera and to remove the politics of the pose from my images" results in stark images never seen before. One interesting quote he makes is that after "Over 350 images later I still find myself compelled to document this phenomena of urbanization in the 21st century where space has become so scarce in a city like Mumbai that 'private' acts are often conducted in public. Mumbai Sleeping is a testament to the strength and human spirit of the lower class urban population that drive the wheel of the city by day and sleep on it at night - forcing us to question whether a good night’s sleep is a luxury or a necessity." I think this statement says much about the motivations of the modern world and how we view "necessities when faced with few options.

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Found | Archives of National Geographic

Found | Archives of National Geographic | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.

We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location.

This is just the beginning of a great adventure. We will be adding new voices, stories, and artifacts as we go. We look forward to sharing this experience with everyone, and hope you make FOUND your home for inspiration and wonder.”

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Christ’s Hospital | Photographer: Martin Parr

Christ’s Hospital | Photographer: Martin Parr | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Christ’s Hospital is one of the oldest schools in the country, they still wear Tudor uniforms and yellow socks.

They also have the biggest number of free/subsidised places, which are given to kids from London, as the school was originallyunder the juristrisction of the City of London."- Martin Parr 
Photo report's insight:

Martin Parr is a British documentary photographer, photojournalist and photobook collector. He is known for his photographic projects that take a critical look at aspects of modern life, in particular provincial and suburban life in England. He is a member of Magnum Photos.

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Bangladesh child marriage | Photojournalist: Allison Joyce

Bangladesh child marriage | Photojournalist: Allison Joyce | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of child marriage in the world. Around 29 percent of girls are married before the age of 15, and 65% of girls are already married by the time they turn 18. Families are often in a hurry to marry their daughters off, because girls are thought of as an economic burden. Education is considered unnecessary for girls, because boys get the jobs and bring the money in.

Child marriage is both physically and psychologically damaging. Girls who are forcibly married at a young age are more likely to experience domestic abuse than their unmarried peers and many girls report their first sexual experience is forced. A girl of 15 is five times more likely to die in childbirth than a woman in her twenties.

Allison Joyce, an American photojournalist based in Bangladesh, travelled to a rural area in Manikganj District, west of the capital, and photographed a wedding between a 15-year-old girl and a 32-year-old man.

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Crista K. Banks's curator insight, September 7, 2015 9:57 PM

In the larger cities of these countries child marriage and being bonded has been outlawed, however there are so many people in the rural areas continuing old "traditions." Many times, people in the rural areas do not even know the laws and the problem is compounded because there is noone from the the law there to make sure these practices are being stopped. 

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Made in Bangkok | Photographer: ZACKARY CANEPARI

Made in Bangkok | Photographer: ZACKARY CANEPARI | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

To kick off 2015 let's time travel back to 2014.  This is Bangkok.  The city is sinking into the flood lands it was built on.  Someday soon the roads will be rivers.  But that hasn’t stopped the expansion.  Megacity.  The exurban and suburban zones are nearly as dense as the city center.  Building and rebuilding.  Old and new structures competing for skyline.  Some resemble robots.  Some remain unfinished.  The elevated Skytrain connects them all.  Down below the infrastructure sags.  Progress and tradition.  Congestion edging towards permanent gridlock.  None of the cars, buses, trucks, tuk-tuks, motorcycles, ferry boats, river taxis, scooters and bicycles move at all. 

 

Most people wear hospital masks on the street, pulling them aside to slurp noodles or smoke a cigarette.  The air is thick with humidity and sweat and smog and sex.  Inside, everything is Megamall. Climate controlled consumption.  Medical tourism.  Sex tourism.  Drug tourism.  Displays telling you how to look and how to feel. Massive electronic billboards advertise for dental surgery.  Written in Thai.  In Chinese.  In English.  In Neon.  Screens above and screens below.  Reflections in the puddles, on the windows, in the eyes.  Projections.  Personalized.  Customized.  Individualized.  Food.  Fashion.  Eye color.  Politics.  Products.  Sex.  Gender.   This is Bangkok. - ZACKARY CANEPARI

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Texas Saigon | Photographer: Hahn Hartung

Texas Saigon | Photographer: Hahn Hartung | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The Vietnam War ruled 30 years of the country’s history in the 20thcentury. US Military invaded between 1965 and 1973 and sent hundreds of thousands of US soldiers into the war. The excuse was to prevent a Communist takeover of the whole country which was divided into the communist North, and the pro-American South. In1975 the North won the war and the last Americans left the country.

Forty years after the war there are no more foreign troops in the country but platoons of tourists visiting the old battlefields and tunnels excavated by Viet-Cong guerillas. There is a market selling old military stuff and even faking it. The Defoliation Spray called “Agent Orange” is still affecting the people and causes disabilities. During the war US Airforces dropped 7 million tons of bombs on Vietnam and there are still remaining bombs and landmines below ground. Even though America lost the war, capitalism finally triumphed and the remains of the war serve its prosperity. So we are looking at a country that has just opened up and the new generation is being exposed to a growing Western influence.

Roughly 40 years after the conflict ended, the absurdity of war and its consequences are more obvious than ever. - Hahn Hartung

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Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova

Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

The documentary was held in Norilsk between February 2012 and February 2013.
The documentary was supported by the Lagardère foundation grant for photography.

« Days of Night – Nights of Day » is about the daily life of the inhabitants of Norilsk, a mining city northernmost of the polar circle with a population of more than 170 000.  The city, its mines and metallurgical factories were constructed by prisoners of the Gulag.  With 60% of the present population involved in the industrial process, this documentary aims to investigate human adaptation to extreme climate, ecological disaster and isolation.
Norilsk is the 7th most polluted city in the world.  The average temperature is -10C, reaching lows of -55C in winter, when for two months the city is plunged into polar night.
The living conditions of the people of Norilsk are unique, making their plight incomparable. - Elena Chernyshova

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Bonnie, a life in prostitution | Photojournalist: Marie Hald

Bonnie, a life in prostitution | Photojournalist: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
39-year old Bonnie is a danish mother of three. Since the age of 18, she has been working as a prostitute. Her first time having sex for money was at a visit at a brothel in a small town. Bonnie and her friend were in need of money and tried it out.

 

The experience was unpleasant and Bonnie was shy and ashamed of her body. But because of the money, she kept working. Bonnie has a house In a small village in Sealand. Here she works everyday from 9-4. When her day is over she picks up her kids and goes home to her real house in another nearby village. Her oldest daughter Michella (16) has her own apartment and her son Oliver (14) lives at home. 6-year old Noa, Bonnies youngest son, thinks his mother has a job as a cleaning lady.

 

The older children know what her profession is, and so does their school, the community and so on. It is not easy for Oliver and Michella and Michella has been called names and asked how much her mother costs. That made her very upset. Bonnie pays taxes and is registered as a business. Although she is in trouble with the IRS and has been to prison more than once. The single most important thing in Bonnie's life is her children." - MARIE HALD

 

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Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov

Shipbreakers | Photojournalist: Jana Ašenbrennerov | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Chittagong is one of the biggest ship breaking yards in the world. It is graveyard where ships are taken from all around the world for their last voyage, to be taken apart. 


Know for unsafe work practices and environmental pollution due to the demolition and ship breaking processes, Chittagong presents one of the biggest industry and job opportunities for many Bangladeshis.


Some 30, 000 workers are engaged in this scrapping in Bangladesh's Sitakunda coast, which houses the world's second largest ship-breaking industry after China. At least 250,000 people in the country live off the industry directly and indirectly, according to experts.


The industry is a critical contributor to the low-income country's economy, and Bangladesh relies on ship breaking for 80% of its steel needs. But along with the recyclable materials comes a lot of toxic junk and hazardous material such as asbestos.


Often unaware of the risks they face on a daily basis by carrying heavy loads, directly touching materials that are known to cause cancer (asbestos), the workers rarely take these risks into consideration. "I don't see any danger" said a 17 year old worker.


Living in a 3rd world country, taking care of a family, the priorities of workers in the yards of Chittagong have a different order. To be without a job, letting their families go hungry, represents a bigger treat to these men then working in an environment that can eventually lead to health issues or early death. 


Copyright Jana Asenbrennerova 2010 

Collaboration on access and text with Syed Zain Al-Mahmood

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In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“My first inspirations were world-changers like James Nachtwey, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry. I firmly believe that photography has a role to play in provoking thought, spurring dialogue, and prompting action—therein being a potentially potent ingredient in an antidote to social evils.

“Photographs are informative, a record of what we do and value, and contribute important subjective testimonies for history.

 

That said, worldwide trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with over 700,000 women moved across international borders annually. It is not at all realistic to imagine photos making any substantial dent to improve this situation. The photos I take will do little to directly improve the lives of women and children in Sonagachi.

 

“To do this would take massive political, economic and legal overhauls, not to mention years of reshaping social values. This was one of my hardest realizations when following apparently humanistic callings. That images can, however, give people a voice and better inform a public debate, is some journalistic consolation. What makes it immediately worthwhile for me is the experience of earning an individual’s trust, and for a while, touching lives, sharing stories and learning from each other in a dignified, respectful, curious manner. This is the only honest thing I can convince people of offering them, and surprisingly it is also what seems to open the most doors for me.” - Souvid Datta

Photo report's insight:

Mumbai-born photographer Souvid Datta is a young man of 21 whose age puts him somewhere in between the subjects he’s been documenting in the infamous red-light district of Kolkata, India and the subjects’ children. His series, In the Shadows of Kolkata, portrays a close-knit group of female sex workers, a few of their clients, and their children. Exploring the lives of sex workers as a photographic “theme” never fails to affect, and seeing children interspersed into this work adds another layer of difficult material to digest, question, process

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Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva

Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Once upon a time in Siberia, on the shores of the Arctic Ocean, in a warm bed in a small town, a little girl woke up from a dream. It was morning, but it was still dark out, for the little town was so far North that the sun would not show itself for many months. They called this the Polar Night.

The little girl rubbed the sleep from her eyes and dressed in the dark. She put on her pink jacket and red stocking cap and stepped outside. Her breath froze and she walked in the direction of school. All around her were endless fields of frozen tundra. But the fields were not white like you might think, for up above the Aurora Borealis lit up the sky. It looked like a big green breath frozen in the heavens and all around the little girl were beautiful colors. The snow was painted green. And on some mornings—if she was lucky—she’d even see bits of blue, yellow and pink on her walk to school.

She loved these colors very much. Walking through them made her imagination come alive. She liked to think of the fields as blank canvases for Mother Nature to paint upon. And what did that make her? Was she part of the painting too, in her pink jacket and red hat?

She smiled and her mind began dreaming of the days when the Polar Night would come to an end, when the first sun would light up the snowy mountains, making it look like blueberry ice cream. And then the summer would come, the snow would melt and the tundra would transform into planet Mars with it’s golden color seeming to stretch out forever in every direction.

She thought to herself, “Every season has its own colors.” She stored all these colors in her heart, and walked beneath the Aurora Borealis in this little town way up North.

The town was called Tiksi. - 

 

Photo report's insight:

Evgenia Arbugaeva is one of 50 photographers in the Critical Mass 2011 exhibition Contents: Love, Anxiety, Happiness & Everything Else atPhoto Center NW. This exhibition, juried by Darius Himes, will also travel to Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, and RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, furthering the mission of all four photography organizations to bring top emerging talent to the public.

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Princesses in a land of Machos | Photographer: Nicola Ókin Frioli

Princesses in  a land of Machos | Photographer: Nicola Ókin Frioli | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Before Spanish colonization blanketed Mexico with Catholicism, there were cross-dressing Aztec priests and hermaphrodite Mayan gods; gender flexibility was inherent in the culture. In much of the country now, machismo prevails and attitudes toward sex remain relatively narrow. But things are different in the southern state of Oaxaca where more pliant thinking remains. In the Zapotec communities around the town of Juchitán, men who consider themselves women—called “muxes”—are not only accepted, but celebrated as symbols of good luck.

 

Mexico City-based photographer Nicola “Ókin” Frioli traveled to Juchitán to photograph muxes for the series, We Are Princesses in a Land of Machos. His photos capture just some of the estimated 3,000 muxes in the area, which has a total population of around 160,000. The muxes traditionally adopt female roles like cooking, embroidery, sewing, and preparing for celebrations. They are seen as having special intellectual and artistic gifts.

Local lore has it that the muxes fell from the torn pocket of San Vicente Ferrer, the patron saint of Juchitán, during his holy walk over the town. Which is to say, they are the lucky, chosen people; colonizing the ephemeral state between genders, and bringing good fortune to a culture already blessed with open minds and good will.

 

Photo report's insight:


Nicola Okin Frioli's Official Photography website; Fine Art, Portraiture, Advertising, Fashion and Reportage Photography, Biography, Exhibitions. Okin is currently based in Mexico City.

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Blue eyes, black hijab | Photographer: Isabella De Maddalena

Blue eyes, black hijab | Photographer: Isabella De Maddalena | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

There's a large muslim community in Aarhus, Denmark, and a very high number of danish converted to Islam. The estimated number of women wearing the niqab in Denmark is about 150-200. Aisha is a Danish woman who converted to Islam 22 years ago, when she was just 20. Today, she wears the niqab, the 'total veil', subject of many discussions in different countries in Europe.


Like so many other governments in Europe, the idea of banning the burqa or niqab in public places has been progressing in Denmark. The debate caused a split beetween the Conservatives and the Liberal Party in 2009. Lawyers of the Justice Ministry finally found the proposal unconstitutional.


But today the idea is still a topic of discussion: it is argued that the burqa or the niqab are strongly anti-integrationist, an attack on the dignity of women and also a security risk. "Even if the Niqab will be banned, I'll continue to wear it, anyway," Aisha says, it is my religion, my choice and I have to respect it. - 

Photo report's insight:
Isabella De Maddalena  was born in Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy, in 1978.                                                                              

In 2002 she graduated from the Brera Academy of Fine Art in Milan, with a focus in Painting. She studied photojournalism at the Danish School of Photojournalism in Aarhus, Denmark in 2010.
Her work has been published on varoius magazines, among them: Women's Wear Daily, Io Donna, IL - Intelligence in Lifestyle, Rolling Stone, Internazionale, L'Espresso, Allure Russia, Cosmopolitan Germany.
In 2011 I joined the agency Luzphoto.  

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Ethiopia | Photojournalist: Ami Vitale

Ethiopia  | Photojournalist: Ami Vitale | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"This journey across Ethiopia traces the origination of coffee that goes back to the thirteenth century. Legend says that a herder named Kaldi noticed his goats “dancing” after nibbling bright red berries. Kaldi brought the berries to a nearby monastery where holy men declared they must be the work of the devil and threw them into a fire. Yet, the aroma was too tempting and they quickly raked the roasted beans from the embers, ground them up, and dissolved them in hot water, yielding the world’s first cup of coffee." - Ami Vitale

Photo report's insight:

Ami Vitale  is an American photojournalist and documentary film maker.  Her photographs have been exhibited around the world in museums and galleries and published in international magazines including National Geographic, Geo, Newsweek, Time and Smithsonian, among others. She is an internationally known and respected journalist whose work has garnered multiple World Press Photos awards, the Photographer of the Year International award, the Lowell Thomas Award for Travel Journalism, Lucie awards, the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding Reporting, and the Magazine Photographer of the Year award by the National Press Photographers Association.

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Castro's People | Photojournalist: Susi Eggenberger (ZUMA PRESS)

Castro's People | Photojournalist: Susi Eggenberger (ZUMA PRESS) | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Ninety miles from America and roughly the size of Pennsylvania the totalitarian communist state of Cuba is home to more than eleven million people.  A multiracial society with a population of mainly Spanish origins and Catholic faith, Cuba boasts one of the best health care systems in the world with the average life expectancy comparable to the UK while it's average monthly salary is only $20.00.  Prolonged austerity and the state controlled economy's insufficiency in providing adequate services and goods have forced an estimated 40% of Cubans to turn to the black market in order to obtain necessary clothing, food and household items.  Historically, Cuban law subordinates it's people from freedom of movement, speech, assembly and the press.  However, efforts by the government for economic and social reform have recently loosened some of the constraints on travel, real estate and business creating a mixture of excitement and trepidation in the Cuban people." - Susi Eggenberger

Photo report's insight:

 

Susi Eggenberger is an independent documentary photographer based in Southern Maine and is available for assignment.

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