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Hatha yoga | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Hatha yoga | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Sandra Insoha, a famous French Hatha Yoga teacher has offered one of the most prestigious teacher training programs Paris since 2010. Hatha yoga (Sanskrit: हठयोग haṭhayoga), also called hatha vidya (हठविद्या), is a system of yoga described by Yogi Swatmarama, a Hindu sage of 15th century India, and compiler of the Hatha Yoga Pradipika.The Sanskrit term haṭha refers to the use of persistence or force, and haṭhayoga is translated by the Monier-Williams dictionary as "a kind of forced Yoga or abstract meditation".

 

Serge Bouvet photographed a few of Hatha Yoga figures on urban spot. 

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Caroline Brasch Nielsen & Madison Headrick | Fashion photographer: Greg Kadel For Numéro #134

Caroline Brasch Nielsen & Madison Headrick | Fashion photographer: Greg Kadel For Numéro #134 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Greg Kadel is an American fashion photographer and filmmaker based in New York City. Greg Kadel’s images have appeared in publications including American Vogue, Vogue Italia, Vogue Nippon, Vogue UK, L'Uomo Vogue, French Vogue, Vogue Germany, Vogue China, Numéro, Numéro Homme, Visionaire, i-D, The Face, Another Magazine, Harper's Bazaar, W Jewelry, British GQ, 10 Magazine, Allure, Inside View, V, Melody. His advertising clients include Aveda, Express, Valentino, Louis Vuitton, H&M, Max Mara, Loewe, Oscar de la Renta, Calvin Klein, Biotherm, Diane von Fürstenberg, Elie Tahari, Hermès, Lancôme, L'Oréal, Max Mara, Shiseido, Victoria's Secret, and Salvatore Ferragamo.

 

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Rabari: India's Nomadic Shepherds | Travel photographer: Mitchell Kanashkevich

Rabari: India's Nomadic Shepherds | Travel photographer: Mitchell Kanashkevich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The Rabari are a nomadic tribe of cattle herders. They have roamed the area that covers present-day West India and East Pakistan for almost a thousand years. Despite the constantly changing world around them, the Rabari have managed to cling on to most elements of their unique culture and lifestyle for countless generations. However, the current onslaught of change in the form of modernization and land development presents a new and perhaps impossible challenge.

 

With less grazing lands at their disposal, continuing cultural influences of main-stream India and the 'outside' modern world, the Rabari find themselves turning to a more sedentary lifestyle and exchanging their distinct traditional costumes for which they are famous around India, for 'made-in-China' t-shirts and baseball caps. This is a look at some of the last of the traditional Rabari people, as well as a glance at what their future might look like.

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People of Rajasthan | Travel photographer: Serge Bouvet

People of Rajasthan | Travel photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Wherever Serge Bouvet go, it is invariably the people who reveal most about Rajasthan. 

Rajasthan is so vast and full of variety that even the Indians don’t get to see the whole of it, let alone the tourists. You have to visit the place to know it. However, the travel photographers like Serge Bouvet give you a good idea of how the place looks and how it should feel like. It also helps you to decide what places you want to visit when you are planning a trip to India.

 

Serge Bouvet have collected a number of photographs which capture the colorful glimpses of the daily life in India. These photos give you a broader view of the people and cultural heritage of Rajasthan. 

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Istanbul: City of a Hundred Names | Photographer: Alex Webb

Istanbul: City of a Hundred Names | Photographer: Alex Webb | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

In Istanbul: City of a Hundred Names, Magnum photographer Alex Webb displays his particular ability to distill gesture, color and contrasting cultural tensions into a single, beguiling frame. He presents a vision of Istanbul as an urban cultural center, rich with the incandescence of its past--a city of minarets and pigeons rising to the heavens during the early-morning call to Muslim prayers--yet also a city riddled with ATM machines and clothed in designer jeans.

 

Webb began photographing Istanbul in 1998, and became instantly enthralled: by the people, the layers of culture and history, the richness of street life. But what particularly drew him in was a sense of Istanbul as a border city, lying between Europe and Asia. "For 30-some years as a photographer, I have been intrigued by borders, places where cultures come together, sometimes easily, sometimes roughly." The resulting body of work, some of Webb's strongest to date, conveys the frisson of a culture in transition, yet firmly rooted in a complex history. With essay by the Nobel Prize winning novelist, Orhan Pamuk.

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Photography: What’s real, what’s not and does it matter? | Photographer: Matt Brandon

Photography: What’s real, what’s not and does it matter? | Photographer: Matt Brandon | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I think, the real issue here isn’t what a photographer does or what photography is. The real issue is how we try to define it. Some people, want to define it very narrowly and say photography is for capturing an image of reality. Fine. There are people that use the camera like an office worker uses a xerox machine. If that’s how you want to define it for yourself then that is all well and good. But that’s too narrow for the rest of the world. Likewise, there are people who use a camera like Picasso used a brush. These people are every bit an artist. So, the question really is, either what have you defined as your personal boundaries or what has your profession defined?

 

Look at it this way, if I’m working for the National Geographic magazine they have very strict standards of what can be done with an image once it’s shot. My friend, and Nat Geo photographer, Ami Vitale told me she has to send in the raw files to her editors, completely untouched. In fact, they’re not even allowed to delete files from the card. That’s fine. If that’s the way the magazine wants to do it, and you want to work for the magazine, then you do it their way. You have a choice, their way or the highway. The fact is, there is no right or wrong when it comes to using this tool we call a camera."

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