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COAL MINES | Photographer: Ken Hermann

COAL MINES | Photographer:  Ken Hermann | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Based in Copenhagen, Ken Hermann works for a diverse range of clients amongst those leading brands, agencies and media corporations.
Ken Hermann has a degree in advertising photography and his work has been published by a number of magazines and exhibited around the world. His City Surfer project made him the winner of Hasselblad Masters 2012.
An urge to explore photography has brought Ken around the world, from secluded regions of India and Ethiopia to the big city landscapes of New York where he has worked for renowned photographers like Brigitte Lacombe and Asger Carlsen.
The life in the cities as well as in the more abandon places is a big inspirational source to Ken Hermann and he loves to combine his commercial work with his other true passion- to explore life, people, and cultures.

Ken Hermann works in the fields of portrait, editorial – and commercial photography. In 2012 he became a member of Getty Images and win the Hasselblad Masters 2012.

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Dark Clouds | Photographer: Ian Teh

Dark Clouds | Photographer: Ian Teh | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

A thick layer of grey ash covers the road leading to an industrial site. The air in the city is acrid and dense. Industrial plants and factories loom out of the haze and disappear once more as one travels beyond the city. Further into the mountains there are sounds of explosions as workers use dynamite to extract limestone for the steel plants. In another valley, not too far away, miners go deep into a pit shaft in the early hours of the morning.—Ian Teh

Photo report's insight:

London-based photographer Ian Teh describes Dark Clouds, his project investigating China’s most industrialized cities, as “an exploration of the darker side of the economy’s bright, shiny facade.” Teh follows Chinese workers in the coal industry, giving us a glimpse into the lives of those that are integral in the development of a nation, but are rarely seen or recognized.

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