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Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu

Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As smoking regulations in North America get stricter, the number of smokers, especially among younger generations, are in decline. If Mad Men taught us anything, it’s that smoking is not nearly as common as it used to be. In some circles, it can even be seen as taboo. Considering these changing habits of North Americans, it’s incredibly startling to see the recent series by Toronto based photographer Michelle Siu. For Marlboro Boys, she travelled to Indonesia to document the shocking reality of young smokers.

It’s easy to begin smoking when it’s presence is everywhere. As the fifth largest tobacco market in the world, Indonesians are bombarded with ever-present advertising targeting youth and easy access to cheap cigarettes (about one dollar a pack). The industry is closely tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. What’s most alarming, is that the habit is forming early. According to a recent study, the number of children smokers aged 10 to 14 has doubled over the past 20 years, and has tripled for those ages five to nine.

Photo report's insight:

"Indonesia’s relationship with tobacco is complex. Cheap cigarettes, ubiquitous advertising, a powerful lobby with tight political connections and lack of law enforcement fuels a national addiction. 

 

Indonesia holds one of the world’s highest rates of male smokers and it often begins at a young age. Boys are growing up in an environment where demand for tobacco is strong and foreign tobacco giants such as Marlboro maker Philip Morris, are establishing themselves as smoking rates decline in other countries. 

 

With the fifth largest tobacco market internationally, the industry is tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. Indonesia remains one of the few countries that has not joined the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control of the World Health Organization which aims “to protect present and future generations from the devastating health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke.” 

 

Young smokers begin the cycle of addiction but at a health cost for generations to come. The juxtaposition of young boys smoking like seasoned addicts is jarring yet this project is intended to not only shock and inform viewers but to demonstrate the lack of enforcement of national health regulations and to question the country’s dated relationship with tobacco." - MICHELLE SIU

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In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“My first inspirations were world-changers like James Nachtwey, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry. I firmly believe that photography has a role to play in provoking thought, spurring dialogue, and prompting action—therein being a potentially potent ingredient in an antidote to social evils.

“Photographs are informative, a record of what we do and value, and contribute important subjective testimonies for history.

 

That said, worldwide trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with over 700,000 women moved across international borders annually. It is not at all realistic to imagine photos making any substantial dent to improve this situation. The photos I take will do little to directly improve the lives of women and children in Sonagachi.

 

“To do this would take massive political, economic and legal overhauls, not to mention years of reshaping social values. This was one of my hardest realizations when following apparently humanistic callings. That images can, however, give people a voice and better inform a public debate, is some journalistic consolation. What makes it immediately worthwhile for me is the experience of earning an individual’s trust, and for a while, touching lives, sharing stories and learning from each other in a dignified, respectful, curious manner. This is the only honest thing I can convince people of offering them, and surprisingly it is also what seems to open the most doors for me.” - Souvid Datta

Photo report's insight:

Mumbai-born photographer Souvid Datta is a young man of 21 whose age puts him somewhere in between the subjects he’s been documenting in the infamous red-light district of Kolkata, India and the subjects’ children. His series, In the Shadows of Kolkata, portrays a close-knit group of female sex workers, a few of their clients, and their children. Exploring the lives of sex workers as a photographic “theme” never fails to affect, and seeing children interspersed into this work adds another layer of difficult material to digest, question, process

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The Adventures of Guille and Belinda : Photographer: ALESSANDRA SANGUINETTI

The Adventures of Guille and Belinda : Photographer: ALESSANDRA SANGUINETTI | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I spent my childhood summers at my father's farm outside Buenos Aires. After the long highway drive and dusty dirt road, as soon as we arrived, I would run to the front of the car and begin the delicate process of unsticking the crushed butterflies from the still hot radiator.

Most of them would be terminal, but one or two would cling to my finger, slowly regain center, revive and eventually fly away, always leaving behind some dust from their wings. 


I have two older sisters, but when I was nine, they were teenagers, existing in another dimension, so I would wander pretty much alone around the corrals, the sheds and the fields, talking to the horses and the cows, feeling sad for the perpetually frightened sheep, following my father as he made his rounds, chatting with the foreman's wife Isabel, looking for snake skins on tree branches, turning beetles right side up, and flying kites made from newspapers.  In the evenings I cut up old New Yorker magazines my mother brought back from her trips to the US, and with those pictures I illustrated my own journal, "The Bumble Bee", which I would sell to my parents for one peso." - ALESSANDRA SANGUINETTI

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Waiting for Justice | Photographer: Fernando Moleres

Waiting for Justice | Photographer: Fernando Moleres | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Abdul Moresey arrive to Pademba prison in 2007 as a child. He was charged  with murder. The facts are that  Abdul  went to the river  with his best friend and this was drowned. The child´s family accused Abdul  of murder and he is  four  years pending trial. Sentencing in this country is abnormally harsh, and the Sierra Leone government has pronounced that criminal responsibility begins at age ten, which is in clear conflict with the Convention for Child Rights ratified by the same government  in 1990.

Photo report's insight:

"This work was mostly shot in Pademba Road Prison where 32 children, between the years of 14 and 17, share prison life with 1,300 adults." - Fernando Moleres

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60 millions d’enfants au travail en Inde | photographe reporter : Serge Bouvet

60 millions d’enfants au travail en Inde | photographe reporter : Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

(...)

 

" La petite fille marchait penchée en avant, la tête baissée, comme une vieille; le poids du bidon tendait et raidissait ses bras maigres; de temps en temps elle était forcée de s’arrêter, et chaque fois qu’elle s’arrêtait elle regardait son bidon comme un prisonnier regarderait son boulet. Cela se passait à Jaipur, en Inde, en mars 2012, loin de tout regard humain compatissant; c’était une enfant de 6 ans.

 

Hélas, l’Inde détient toujours ce triste record du monde : du plus grand nombre d’enfants travailleurs.  Les ONG estiment en effet que l’Inde compte près de 60 millions d’enfants au travail. Ils sont collecteurs de bouteilles, de plastique, chiffonnier dans les bidonvilles,   vendeurs de journaux, ramasseurs de poubelles, cireurs de chaussures,  serveurs dans les dabahs, employés de maison comme cette fille que j’ai photographié avec son bidon d’eau…" - Serge Bouvet

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Cystic Fibrosis | Photographer: Kyle Monk

Cystic Fibrosis | Photographer: Kyle Monk | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I am working with the CF Foundation to create dramatic, powerful, and intimate portraits of people with Cystic Fibrosis to help bring awareness to this genetic disease - most common among caucasians. Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) and nebulizers are treatments that help people with CF stay healthy and breathe easier.  Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease of the mucus glands that affects many body systems. The disorder's most common signs and symptoms include progressive damage to the respiratory system and chronic digestive system problems.  

ACTs loosen thick, sticky lung mucus so it can be cleared by coughing or huffing. Clearing airways reduces lung infections and improves lung function. ACTs are often used with other treatments, like inhaled bronchodilators and antibiotics.

Nebulizers break down liquid medicine into aerosol mist that can be inhaled by the patient through a mouthpiece or facemask. Like inhalers, these devices can deliver medication straight into the lungs by simply inhaling the medication mist.

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AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte

AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

This is Habib Manzah Iddi’s first motorcycle. He is part of a growing new generation of youth that is aware of the surrounding world and strives towards their dreams. They are determined not to live like their parents did, but wish to assimilate to the modern world.

According to the UN site World’s Best News, every third African is now considered middle class, around 33% of the population having up to $20 dollars to spend a day. With the extreme poverty of the last few decades slowly dissipating, people in places like Ghana can afford more than just food for survival. Across the continent, Africans are spending more money on education, healthcare and entrepreneurial endeavors, creating a landscape of rapid cultural, economic and social change. Danish photographer Ulrik Tofte documents the young people in the middle of this transformative upheaval, their lives a constant balance of old traditions and new possibilities.

The Key Is Not To Blink presents a different vision of Africa than we are used to. Tofte focused on youth in Northern Ghana, determined to capture images contrasting the typical photos of war and starving children so familiar to us. The growing middle class has created a culture more focused on the individual – people now more free to have dreams, desires and personal goals. Torn between issues of religion, pop culture, familial expectations and consumerism, young Africans have an uncertain and limitless world in which to navigate their lives. Though progress can be slow, Ghana and other countries like it continue to move forward while trying to preserve some sense of their past.

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Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta

Risking life for school | Photojournalist: Beawiharta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I went to Jakarta’s business district to find photos of middle-class workers returning to their homes. When I had finished, I realized that I had something different to shoot for the next day. I searched Google maps to find the location of the collapsed bridge but I couldn’t find the exact location. There was a blank map with only the name of the village, Sanghiang Tanjung. Surprisingly, it said the village was just 130 kms (80 miles) away from our Jakarta office – a travel time of about two hours. My estimation was it would take 4 hours.

 

3am Thursday morning, my friend and driver Soewarno and I headed to the village. We reached by 6am. But the difficulty was this village was just a blank area on the map. Also, we had to find the right direction that the students would take, so that I could take a pictures from the front, not from the back. We found many roads in the village but no one knew where the bridge was. With the help of my friends, we were able to get the name of the head of the village, Epi Sopian, who accompanied us to the location. Edi said the bridge collapsed during Saturday’s big flood when wood and bamboo hit the suspension bridge’s pillar.

 

I arrived at the location as the students were crossing. They were already in the middle of the bridge. Oh no, these could not be the children who wanted to go to school, I thought! It was more like an acrobatic show the collapsed bridge as an apparatus and without any safety device at all. They walked slowly, sometimes screaming as their shoes slipped. Suddenly the rain came. A last group of students, Sofiah and her friend, were on the bridge. Happily, all the students crossed safely. I took pictures for no more than five minutes. (...)

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Jisu Asrham| Photographer: Javier Arcenillas

Jisu Asrham| Photographer: Javier Arcenillas | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Only a hundred miles from Kolkata, but immersed in a jungle in which time seems to stand still, a Jesuit missionary group has expanded the meaning of being called “parents”.

In its mission “Jisu Ashram” hosts over a hundred children from families of agriculturists of lower castes. There are a thousand children and parents to represent the only hope for the future of a new generation of young Indians who are suffering, with concealed virulence, an abrupt transition to the modern era, the era of big cities, which work in the field and differ little from slavery.

Photo report's insight:

Humanist. Freelance photographer, member of Gea Photowords.

He develops humanitarian essays where the main characters are integrated in societies that border and set upon any reason or human right in a world that becomes increasingly more and more indifferent.

He is a psychologist at the Complutense University of Madrid. He has won several international prizes, including The Arts Press Award, Kodak Young Photographer, European Social Fund Grant, Euro Press of Fujifilm, Make History, UNICEF, SONY WPY, Fotoevidence POYI.

Currently he is carrying out new ideas in parallel with traditional journalism to spread his projects, and he is making up Audiovisual Projects with diplomatic work.

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Omo Valley | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Omo Valley | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

It was a privilege to go to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their work to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued.


I met John in Burma a few years ago. He is a photographer and successful businessman who has founded companies which develop software for digital media and the entertainment industry. 
He has also devoted a tremendous amount of time, energy, and financial assistance to the work of Omo Child. Lale was born into the Kara Tribe in the Omo River Valley.  He was one of the first of his tribe to receive a formal education.

 

That opportunity led him to realize the critical importance of ending the tribal ritual of Mingi. Lale lost two sisters to Mingi. Outlawing and stopping this devastating practice of Mingi is his life’s mission. - Steve Mccurry

Photo report's insight:

Please join me to help John and Lale rescue and care for these children.
http://www.omochild.org

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Uganda Color | Photographer: Gloria Feinstein

Uganda Color | Photographer: Gloria Feinstein | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“For the past six years I’ve been making photographs of the children living at St. Mary Kevin Orphanage in Uganda. These kids have lost one or both parents to disease or civil war. I founded a not-for-profit organization called Change the Truth shortly after my first visit in 2006. Since then, these children have become part of my extended family. I spend most of the year raising funds to help provide food, medical care and school fees for them. Without assistance, their futures would be dim. Once a year I return to the orphanage to spend time with them and make pictures. This past December I ventured outside the walls of the orphanage to meet and photograph some of the people living in the surrounding village."

 

"The warm, generous Ugandans I have met along the way love having their picture taken; in some cases my pictures have been the first they have ever seen of themselves. The children at the orphanage and in the village feel that because I share my photographs with so many once I return to America, they are surely quite famous! They also know that the photographs I make give them a voice they might not otherwise have; this voice leads to a raising of awareness about their plight and a positive change in their lives.”

- Gloria Baker Feinstein

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