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Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu

Marlboro Boys | Freelance Photographer: Michelle Siu | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As smoking regulations in North America get stricter, the number of smokers, especially among younger generations, are in decline. If Mad Men taught us anything, it’s that smoking is not nearly as common as it used to be. In some circles, it can even be seen as taboo. Considering these changing habits of North Americans, it’s incredibly startling to see the recent series by Toronto based photographer Michelle Siu. For Marlboro Boys, she travelled to Indonesia to document the shocking reality of young smokers.

It’s easy to begin smoking when it’s presence is everywhere. As the fifth largest tobacco market in the world, Indonesians are bombarded with ever-present advertising targeting youth and easy access to cheap cigarettes (about one dollar a pack). The industry is closely tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. What’s most alarming, is that the habit is forming early. According to a recent study, the number of children smokers aged 10 to 14 has doubled over the past 20 years, and has tripled for those ages five to nine.

Photo report's insight:

"Indonesia’s relationship with tobacco is complex. Cheap cigarettes, ubiquitous advertising, a powerful lobby with tight political connections and lack of law enforcement fuels a national addiction. 

 

Indonesia holds one of the world’s highest rates of male smokers and it often begins at a young age. Boys are growing up in an environment where demand for tobacco is strong and foreign tobacco giants such as Marlboro maker Philip Morris, are establishing themselves as smoking rates decline in other countries. 

 

With the fifth largest tobacco market internationally, the industry is tied to the country’s economy and that industry relies on consumption. Indonesia remains one of the few countries that has not joined the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control of the World Health Organization which aims “to protect present and future generations from the devastating health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke.” 

 

Young smokers begin the cycle of addiction but at a health cost for generations to come. The juxtaposition of young boys smoking like seasoned addicts is jarring yet this project is intended to not only shock and inform viewers but to demonstrate the lack of enforcement of national health regulations and to question the country’s dated relationship with tobacco." - MICHELLE SIU

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Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Child Labor | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"For the past three decades as I traveled the world on assignment I
have witnessed children working in fields, factories, ditches, tunnels, mines, and ship-breaking yards. The scope of the problem is vast. Hundreds of millions of children spend their  childhood working and do not have an opportunity to play, go to school, or live in a healthy environment." - Steve McCurry

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

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Waiting for Justice | Photographer: Fernando Moleres

Waiting for Justice | Photographer: Fernando Moleres | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Abdul Moresey arrive to Pademba prison in 2007 as a child. He was charged  with murder. The facts are that  Abdul  went to the river  with his best friend and this was drowned. The child´s family accused Abdul  of murder and he is  four  years pending trial. Sentencing in this country is abnormally harsh, and the Sierra Leone government has pronounced that criminal responsibility begins at age ten, which is in clear conflict with the Convention for Child Rights ratified by the same government  in 1990.

Photo report's insight:

"This work was mostly shot in Pademba Road Prison where 32 children, between the years of 14 and 17, share prison life with 1,300 adults." - Fernando Moleres

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Cystic Fibrosis | Photographer: Kyle Monk

Cystic Fibrosis | Photographer: Kyle Monk | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I am working with the CF Foundation to create dramatic, powerful, and intimate portraits of people with Cystic Fibrosis to help bring awareness to this genetic disease - most common among caucasians. Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) and nebulizers are treatments that help people with CF stay healthy and breathe easier.  Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease of the mucus glands that affects many body systems. The disorder's most common signs and symptoms include progressive damage to the respiratory system and chronic digestive system problems.  

ACTs loosen thick, sticky lung mucus so it can be cleared by coughing or huffing. Clearing airways reduces lung infections and improves lung function. ACTs are often used with other treatments, like inhaled bronchodilators and antibiotics.

Nebulizers break down liquid medicine into aerosol mist that can be inhaled by the patient through a mouthpiece or facemask. Like inhalers, these devices can deliver medication straight into the lungs by simply inhaling the medication mist.

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Child Labor |Photographer in China : Photography : Shiho Fukada

Child Labor |Photographer in China : Photography : Shiho Fukada | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Shiho Fukada is a freelance photographer based in Beijing, China. She is a native of Tokyo, Japan with a degree in English literature, who worked in the fashion and advertising industries in New York before becoming a photojournalist. Her work has been featured in numerous publications including The New York Times, Newsweek, Time, Fortune, Geo, Stern, De Spiegel, Le Monde, Figaro and New York Magazine among others. She has also shot several television commercials, using her still images. Her commercial clients include Microsoft, Nike, Clinique, Johnson & Johnson, CBS News and MSNBC. She was recently awarded a grant from the Alicia Patterson Foundation and in 2009 The New York Times nominated her photographs for a Pulitzer Prize in breaking news.

 

Child Labor

Poverty pushes estimated 6 to 7 million children to work in Bangladesh, comprising one-fifth of the country’s labor force.
There are some 40 industries in Bangladesh using child labor, often under hazardous conditions and with little regard for health and safety.
Most perform their duties for little or no pay without access to education leaving them trapped in low-skilled, low-paying jobs that further binds them in a cycle of poverty.

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Menya’s Kids | Photographer: Myriam Abdelaziz

Menya’s Kids | Photographer: Myriam Abdelaziz | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For Menya’s Kids, French photographer Myriam Abdelaziz bears witness to the child labor that persists in the limestone quarries of the city. Situated along the Nile River’s western bank, Menya is host to over 300 quarries employing an estimated 15,000 individuals, many of whom are children who have left school in hopes of pulling their families out of poverty.

 

From the inexperienced age of ten, youngsters enter the quarries to collect bricks carved from the mines, facing both short and longterm dangers. Many are killed or electrocuted by elementary machinery, their limbs severed by the stone-cutting blades. Others face lifelong respiratory illness from limestone dust inhalation. For a $15 weekly salary, the kids awake at dawn and are shuttled to the worksites in darkness so as to avoid the brutal heat of midday. In summer, the temperatures exceed 100 degrees fahrenheit, and the children work from 4:00 in the afternoon to 3:00 in the morning. In the winter, they work in below freezing temperatures from 7:00 AM to 4:00 PM, with little protection from the elements.

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Jisu Asrham| Photographer: Javier Arcenillas

Jisu Asrham| Photographer: Javier Arcenillas | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Only a hundred miles from Kolkata, but immersed in a jungle in which time seems to stand still, a Jesuit missionary group has expanded the meaning of being called “parents”.

In its mission “Jisu Ashram” hosts over a hundred children from families of agriculturists of lower castes. There are a thousand children and parents to represent the only hope for the future of a new generation of young Indians who are suffering, with concealed virulence, an abrupt transition to the modern era, the era of big cities, which work in the field and differ little from slavery.

Photo report's insight:

Humanist. Freelance photographer, member of Gea Photowords.

He develops humanitarian essays where the main characters are integrated in societies that border and set upon any reason or human right in a world that becomes increasingly more and more indifferent.

He is a psychologist at the Complutense University of Madrid. He has won several international prizes, including The Arts Press Award, Kodak Young Photographer, European Social Fund Grant, Euro Press of Fujifilm, Make History, UNICEF, SONY WPY, Fotoevidence POYI.

Currently he is carrying out new ideas in parallel with traditional journalism to spread his projects, and he is making up Audiovisual Projects with diplomatic work.

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Underage | Photographer: Ohm Phanphiroj

Underage | Photographer:  Ohm Phanphiroj | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Thailand has long been known as the sex capital of Asia, and according to a survey in 2004, there are approximately 800,000 underage prostitutes in Thailand and the money being traded at 4.3 billion per year or three percent of Thai economy. This alarming number has put Thailand on the top of the list of underage sexual exploitation according to the U.N.

Underage is a photographic documentation aimed at understanding the minds of these underage male prostitutes in a most candid and visceral way. I want the process to uncover a bit of the life, choice, and consequences that these young boys are experiencing.


Underage prostitution results from several reasons, from being molested by family members and/or relatives, poverty, being a runaway, and drug addiction.

This project is multi-layered and complex in its nature. Psychologically, the project offers provocative and haunting portraits of these lost souls. The visual is visceral and represents an ugly mess and deep-rooted problems of family, teenage years in Thailand, and society. The personal data of each subject is included to offer an insight and to peep into their lives and journey to the opposite side of norms, tradition, and perception. In addition, sexual identification and orientation are being questioned and investigated. While most subjects identify themselves as heterosexual young boys who come to terms with having sex with gay guys for money, almost all of them have never had sex with females. Many of them reason that all men must go through having sex with gay guys in order to understand how to have sex with females when such time comes.

 

I want the images to act as a mirror reflecting the rotten reality of child abuse and exploitation. I also want the images to pose painful questions about life, choice, consequences, and of humanity. Lastly, I hope the project will shed some light about this pervasive situation, raising questions for us about society, corruption, morals, and human treatment.

Also desire, innocence, corruption maturity of the observer, customer, and prostitute…when we look at the pictures, we take the part of both…the boy and the buyer…Mirror neurons"- Ohm Phanphiroj

Photo report's insight:

See the video documentary of this project: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tMFoZkrkvY

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50 years later | Photography : Shiho Fukada

50 years later | Photography : Shiho Fukada | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

It is estimated that in the past thirty years trafficking of women and children in Asia for sexual exploitation has victimized over 30 million people.  It is generally estimated that there are around 20,000 -30,000 female sex workers working through 15-20 licensed brothels in Bangladesh. These victims usually come from poor families, lured into promises of a better life for themselves and their families.

 

They might be offered a job or an education, while others are kidnapped and sold by friends and family members for profit. It is a ruthless business where money overpowers basic human rights. Once they are sold to a madam, they are bonded for a few years, making no money. Even after they are freed, many girls remain at a brothel due to lack of education, social prejudice, and economic necessity.

 

They also believe that their families would suffer several social taboos such as the loss of self respect and social dignity. Children who are born into brothels have limited opportunities because it is unlawful for children raised in brothels to attend school. Some girls have few options but to follow in their mother's footsteps as a sex worker, passing the profession on to the next generation.  Growing old does not mean the end of one’s career, but it does mean working harder for a fraction of the pay a younger woman can expect.

 

There is a significant client demand for young girls, with a positive correlation between the youth of the worker, the number of clients she services and her level of income. As they get older, they find it difficult to get customers and struggle to make a living. Though young and attractive girls can earn about 100 tks (70 tks = US1D) per service, old ones can only charge 30 to 50 tks. "

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60 millions d’enfants au travail en Inde | sergebouvet.com

60 millions d’enfants au travail en Inde | sergebouvet.com | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Elle traînait un bidon rempli d’eau. J’eus l’impression d’être le seul à la remarquer besogner comme un forçat. Elle fit ainsi une dizaine de pas, mais le bidon était était lourd, elle fut forcée de s’arrêter. Elle respira un instant, puis se remit à marcher, cette fois un peu plus longtemps. Mais il fallut s’arrêter encore. Après quelques secondes de repos, elle repartit.

Elle marchait penchée en avant, la tête baissée, comme une vieille; le poids du bidon tendait et raidissait ses bras maigres; de temps en temps elle était forcée de s’arrêter, et chaque fois qu’elle s’arrêtait elle regardait son bidon comme un prisonnier regarderait son boulet. Cela se passait à Jaipur, en Inde, en mars 2012, loin de tout regard humain compatissant; c’était une enfant de 6 ans."

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