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Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco

Portrait | Fine art photographer: Oleg Oprisco | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Oleg Oprisco is a brilliantly talented photographer from Lviv, Ukraine, who creates stunning surreal images of elegant women in fairy-tale or dream-like settings. There’s one significant difference, however, that sets him apart from other artists who create similar work – Oprisco shoots using old-school film photography.

 

The fact that he shoots with film means that everything you see in these photos had to be created that way – it couldn’t be done digitally. “I’ve found it ideal to do everything myself. I come up with a concept, create the clothing, choose the location and direct the hair and makeup,” Oprisco explained in an interview with Bored Panda. “Before shooting, I plan the overall color scheme. According to the chosen palette, I select clothes, props, location, etc, making sure that all of it plays within a single color range.” He uses Kiev 6C and Kiev 88 cameras with medium-format film and a variety of lenses.

 

It’s clear that Oprisco is deeply passionate about his work. “Each of my photos is a scene from real life. That is the perfect source of inspiration for me as there is so much beauty to it.” Oprisco offered some inspiring advice for aspiring young photographers mixed in with some tough love as well. “Drop your job and shoot … if you feel that’s what you want,” he said. “Freedom, happiness, money… all will come after you let go and just shoot.”

 

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 13, 2014 11:52 PM

Oleg Oprisco es un fotógrafo brillante talento de Lviv, Ucrania, que crea impresionantes imágenes surrealistas de las mujeres elegantes de cuento de hadas o ajustes de ensueño. Hay una diferencia significativa, sin embargo, que lo diferencia de otros artistas que crean un trabajo similar - Oprisco dispara usando la vieja escuela de fotografía de la película. 

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“Gaia,The Birth Of An End” | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell

“Gaia,The Birth Of An End” | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Tonight it’s dark in the studio, and I’m curled up in my chair staring at this blank page, about to write the first Wonderland diary entry in 9 long months.. Outside its raining, and this morning brought the first frost I have noticed since last winter. Earlier, as I walked to work I stopped and watched a flutter of yellow leaves circle my boots, reminding me fondly of the cloak I made for ‘The Journey Home’ almost one year ago to the day. These fragments of seasons have become like old friends I find myself silently greeting, one by one as they return unannounced, blown by the autumn wind.


The landscape is changing in colour and I’m hoping for snow, as there is still one last picture I need to create before I can let the story complete. But for now, after months of work I am finally ready to let this last chapter unfold, of what has since become the last 4.5 years of my life.  I still can’t imagine the day I write the words ‘The End’ but it is slowly becoming a palpable reality, which leaves a bitter sweet emotion in my gut. The pictures I have created over the last few months have at times pushed me to my limit, and I know I have learnt so much about myself in the process.


I have had days when I have never felt to so happy to be alive, standing in the woods with my camera, so grateful for every precious moment ….. and others where my own crushing lack of self confidence has made me sick with worry, as to whether or not I have created something good enough. It is always the same with me …. all or nothing, the highest highs and lowest lows, but throughout it all I can say I have tried my hardest. I faced challenges I was genuinely scared of, but forced myself through as they were the only way to produce the ending I always dreamt of. So I just wanted to say how thankful I am to the people who have been on this journey with me and taken Wonderland into their hearts, both the followers of the project and the irreplaceable tiny team I work so closely with."- Kirsty Mitchell 

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Martin Lea's curator insight, November 25, 2013 6:52 AM

More digital imaging than photography but really creative and beautiful.........

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Chandraprabhu Temple | Travel photograher: Serge Bouvet

Chandraprabhu Temple | Travel photograher: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Impossible de contempler les merveilles du sanctuaire de Chandraprabhu tant il y a de monde; ce sont des touristes indiens pour la plupart ou des adeptes religieux. Néanmoins, je sympathise avec les moines Jaïns qui en apprenant que je suis photographe me commande un ensemble de photos. J’accepte. J’ai rendez-vous avec eux à 5h30 du matin. Le temple est vide. Il y fait très sombre. J’ai avec moi, 4 flashs Canon Speedlite 580EX II, un réflecteur, un trépied et 50 roupies de pourboire pour les prêtres.  Je commence à photographier toutes les fresques et  Stambha (colonne sculptée) fébrilement. Je dois faire vite car à 7h00, il y aura du monde. (...)

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The evasion studie | Fine art photographer: Stevens Brahms

The evasion studie | Fine art photographer: Stevens Brahms | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

These images were taken by American photographer Steven Brahms, for his project titled “The Evasion Studies”. Simply put they are dramatic run-for-your-life style portraits in rather unfavourable everyday places. A very simple idea and beautifully executed. In recent news Steven was one of the 2012 recipients of the Aaron Siskind Foundation — Individual Photographer’s Fellowship. Check out his work, it’s all gold.

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ECHOES OF THE COLLAPSE | Photographer: Sergei Isaenko

ECHOES OF THE COLLAPSE | Photographer: Sergei Isaenko | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"In August 1991, while living in Vladikavkaz, Russia, my family watched on an old television screen as the tanks rolled over the Red Square in what is now known as the “August Coup”, a civil action to take over the government. Ultimately it led to the final dissolution of the Soviet Union and ushered in the last stage of theCollapse – the tragic ending of an ideological experiment. As the Iron Curtain fell, a mass migration of refuges spread all over the world from under the dying carcass of the Soviet monster in search of better life. These people including my family are the Echoes of the Collapse."- Sergei Isaenko

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Wonderland – The Journey Home Begins | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell

Wonderland – The Journey Home Begins  | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I’ve re-written the start to this diary entry so many times, that I’m giving up on trying to introduce these pictures in any proper way. So I’m just going to begin from the heart, because it’s what feels the most natural for a set of images that have brought me so much happiness.

 

Recently I gave a talk at my current exhibition at Quaglino’s in London, and realised afterwards, that every picture I had described as being deeply emotional for me had not been taken this year.  That night on the train home, staring out into the darkness I wondered if I had lost my way from the origins of the project, and the human connection that lies at the root of all I try to do. I love the pictures I have produced, but the shoots had definitely become larger more complicated productions, and as a result at times had been more stressful.

 

 I guess I wondered if I had lost a part of me somehow. The last few months had been relentless, I felt I needed to let go…. to breathe, and be outside in the landscape. Maybe I needed to be reminded of who I had been on those first early days in 2009, when nothing else mattered… just the moment, the light… and the dreams I so desperately wanted to create.- kirsty Mitchell

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Chandraprabhu temple of Jaisalmer | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Chandraprabhu temple of Jaisalmer | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Serge Bouvet was invited to photograph the Chandraprabhu temple of Jaisalmer. He have an appointment with jaïn monks at 5.30am. inside temple, it was very dark. He uses 4 flashes Canon Speedlite 580EX II, a reflector, a tripod and 50 rupees tip for priests.

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Jodhpur's Mandanas | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Jodhpur's Mandanas  | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"It is lovely to see all these thresholds naively decorated houses. A Jodhpur or Jaipur, we can not ignore the existence of this folk art painting mandanas, which still continues in Rajasthan. Their ephemeral existence is governed by the religious or the change of seasons."

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Thoughts like five fingers spread | Photographer: Cig Harvey

Thoughts like five fingers spread | Photographer: Cig Harvey | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Cig Harvey is an editorial and fine art photographer whose works invokes a series of sensory experiences. One glance at her images often inspires a sense of magic and optimism. Through the use of vibrant colors and deliberate yet simple settings, a sense of wonder, delight and beauty is conveyed that allows readers to connect with the natural world.

Harvey recently moved to Maine where she lives with husband and baby. Her work has been exhibited widely and is in the permanent collections of many major museums.  She was a recent finalist for the prestigious BMW Prize at Paris Photo and had her first solo museum show at The Stenersen Museum in Oslo, Norway.

Harvey will be signing her new monograph, You Look At Me Like An Emergency, at Sylvester & Co. in Sag Harbor, NY this Saturday, June 30. You can read more about this series on Lenscratch.

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Radical Camp | Photographer: Tina Schula

Radical Camp | Photographer: Tina Schula | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

In Radical Camp, photographer Tina Schula reflects upon the rise of extremist groups in the U.S. and Europe. Exploring the structure and strategy of such groups, Schula creates a narrative of images focused on a small group of men and women undergoing training for a deadly mission.

 

Depicting various situations, from kidnappings to general meetings, each photograph emphasizes the vast complexity of extremist groups. Many pictures draw similarities to infamous cults and terrorist organizations of the past, such as Jim Jones and the Baader-Meinhof group, creating a feeling of familiarity and unrest.

 

“By constructing an intricate narrative, I try to convey that, as with extremist groups, the need for social acceptance often outweighs ideology. Radical Campis about the sudden radicalization of previously unpolitical, marginalized individuals. It depicts a deadly serious fictional scenario that could happen here and now,” Schula says.

 

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Portraits of Chinese children | Photography : Yu Xiao

Portraits of Chinese children | Photography : Yu Xiao | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Yu Xiao was born in 1984 in Zi Bo, Shandong, China. She received her M.A. in Photography from China Central Academy of Fine Arts in 2009. She has won many awards and has exhibited in China and America. In this work, ‘Never grow up’, Yu Xiao digitally creates child versions of herself as a commentary on China’s one child rule and the intense focus on childhood that results.

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1503 | Fine art photographer: CHRISTIAN TAGLIAVINI

1503 | Fine art photographer: CHRISTIAN TAGLIAVINI | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With his already legendary series »1503« Christian Tagliavini invites the viewer to a time travel to the 16th century. His protagonists bear names such as Cecilia, Lucrezia or Bartolomeo, they are gracile, graceful or mighty and all of them express the pride of the Renaissance. In the style of the Florentine Agnolo di Cosimo, in art history better known as Bronzino, Tagliavini gives the patina of Mannerism to his modern sitters. The title of the series »1503« is also a reference to Bronzino’s year of birth.

 

The artist does not only stages the image space or places the light. The accurate spadework of each portrait is an inalienable foundation for the accomplished work that attracts the recipient. From the casting over the design of the dresses through to the makeup, Tagliavini is the indicatory player in every single operating procedure. The universal artist creates a piece of art that is the result of this creative process – the traces of them meet up in the final work and culminate in something sublime.

 

By doing so, the artist perfectly succeeds in the challenge of citing art history without simply copying it. Finally, with a productive period of more than 13 months the series »1503« has become an impressive testament of the visionary creative richness of the avant-gardist Christian Tagliavini. 

Photo report's insight:

Born in 1971, Christian Tagliavini grew up in Italy and Switzerland. He had studied graphic design and worked as an architect and graphic artist before he focused on photography art in 2000. Additional fine arts such as architecture, graphic design or drawing have influenced his art until today. His biographic background also shaped his understanding of art to invent and construct works. His works cannot only be seen as images, they are complex pieces of art, which have their roots in different materials. Tagliavini’s creative work is mostly mirrored in series that tell stories, offer multifaceted quotes or which are the result of an unusual contemporary concept. His works have been exhibited in numerous exhibitions and art fairs worldwide. Christian Tagliavini, who was honoured with the Hasselblad Masters Award in 2012, lives and works in Switzerland today.

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Rob Vonmeulen's curator insight, January 8, 2014 8:08 AM

Back to 1500 .... 

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BERLIN | Fine art photographer: Erwin Olaf

BERLIN | Fine art photographer: Erwin Olaf | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"My latest series, Berlin, is a multimedia presentation of photography, film and 3D work. The series is about the relationship of the child and the adult, and how that relationship is shifting. It’s unclear who is in charge, and who is directing who. I was inspired by several things for this series, by the city Berlin, but also by this changing relationship between child and adult. I tried to translate that into my work, but without giving a clear discourse." - Erwin Olaf

Photo report's insight:

Erwin Olaf (Erwin Olaf Springveld) (born June 2, 1959 Hilversum, Netherlands) is a Dutch photographer.

Olaf is most famous for his commercial and personal work. He has been commissioned to photograph advertising campaigns for large international companies such as Levi's, Microsoft and Nokia. Some of his most famous photographic series include "Grief", "Rain", and "Royal Blood". Never one to shy away from controversy, Olaf's work is often daring and provocative. Humorously however, one of his early photographs was once expelled from a show on the basis of not containing nudity.

His work has received many awards and he has held exhibitions around the world.

Olaf studied journalism in the School of Journalism in Utrecht. His work is shown in galleries and museums all around the world, for example at Flatland Gallery, Utrecht; Hasted Hunt, New York; Hamiltons Gallery, London; Galerie Magda Danysz, Paris; Gallery Espacio Minimo, Madrid ; and many others.

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Martin Lea's curator insight, November 10, 2013 7:20 AM

uncertain about this .............maybe that is the point though ........

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I used to be you | Photographer: Kyoko Hamada

I used to be you | Photographer: Kyoko Hamada | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Kyoko Hamada’s Self Portraits Imagine What Her Life Will be Like in 30 Years

 

"When I first tried on her gray wig, the latex makeup, and her clothes, I gazed at the mirror for a long time. My initial reaction was to chuckle, but I started feeling a little uneasy soon after. The wrinkled face staring back at me resembled my own with thirty-plus years added to it. When I smiled, she smiled back at me. When I pouted, she pouted too."

"It was the first time I had met her, but she was simultaneously someone I already knew quite well and someone I knew nothing about. It has been a year and half since I started photographing Kikuchiyo-san and I have gotten used to dressing up as her. However, when I think of what could happen if we ran into each other in a crowded train station or during a walk in the park, I get uneasy imagining her say, “I used to be you.”—Kyoko Hamada

Photo report's insight:

Brooklyn-based photographer Kyoko Hamada steps out of her comfort zone in her latest series I Used to be You. Her work often consists of ordinary people and objects that she stages into quiet moments that explore various metaphors, but this time around Hamada turns the camera on herself to capture Kikuchiyo-san, the future version of herself. The series was born after Hamada spent time volunteering as a visitor to various seniors in NYC. When she discovered that none of the seniors she was working with were interested in being photographed, she decided to experiment on herself. The project turned into an exploration of aging, memory, and the different phases of life.

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Gaijin | Fine art photographer: David Favrod

Gaijin | Fine art photographer: David Favrod | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Gaijin is a japanese word meaning "the foreigner"

«For a Swiss, I am a Japanese and for a Japanese I am a Swiss or rather a gaijin.»

My name is David "Takashi" Favrod. I was born on the 2nd of July 1982 in Kobe, Japan, of a Japanese mother and a Swiss father. When I was 6 months old, my parents decided to come and live in Switzerland, more precisely in Vionnaz, a little village in lower Valais.

As my father had to travel for his work a lot, I was mainly brought up by my mother who taught me her principles and her culture.

When I was 18, I asked for double nationality at the Japanese embassy, but they refused, because it is only given to Japanese women who wish to obtain their husband’s nationality.


It is from this feeling of rejection and also from a desire to prove that I am as Japanese as I am Swiss that this work was created.

“Gaijin” is a fictional narrative, a tool for my quest for identity, where self-portraits imply an intimate and solitary relationship that I have with myself. The mirror image is frozen in a figurative alter ego that serves as an anchor point.The aim of this work is to create “my own Japan”, in Switzerland, from memories of my journeys when I was small, my mother’s stories, popular and traditional culture and my grandparents war narratives.- David Favrod


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La danse Bhavai | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

La danse Bhavai | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The photographer Serge Bouvet met Bhavai dancer at the slum of Kathputli Colony (India, New Delhi). Bhavai is a genre of folk dance popular in Rajasthan state in western India. The male or female performers balance a number of earthen pots or brass pitchers as they dance nimbly, pirouetting and then swaying with the soles of their feet perched on the top of a glass, on the edge of the sword or on the rim of a brass thali (plate) during the performance.

The accompaniment to the dance is provided by the male performers singing melodious songs and playing a number of musical instruments, which include pakhwaja, dholak, jhanjhar, sarangi, and harmonium. 

Traditionally, this genre of dance was performed by the female performers belonging to the Jat, Bhil, Raigar, Meena, Kumhar, and Kalbelia communities of Rajasthan. It is assumed that this genre of dance was evolved from the exceptional balancing skills of the females of these communities developed to carry a number of pots of water on head over a long distance in the desert.

Photo report's insight:

CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark III

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Wonderland | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell

Wonderland | Fine art photographer:  Kirsty Mitchell | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Kirsty Mitchell's late mother Maureen was an English teacher who spent her life inspiring generations of children with imaginative stories and plays. Following Maureen's death from a brain tumour in 2008, Kirsty channelled her grief into her passion for photography.

She retreated behind the lens of her camera and created Wonderland, an ethereal fantasy world. The photographic series began as a small summer project but grew into an inspirational creative journey.

'Real life became a difficult place to deal with, and I found myself retreating further into an alternative existence through the portal of my camera,' said the artist.

 

This escapism grew into the concept of creating an unexplained storybook without words, dedicated to her [my mother], that would echo the fragments of the fairytales she read to me constantly as a child.'

Kirsty, 36, who has a background in fashion and costume design, collaborated with hair and make-up artist Elbie Van Eeden. 


Both were in full time jobs so they spent evenings and weekends creating props, wigs, and sets on a shoestring budget and shot in the woodlands surrounding Kirsty's home in Surrey.

Kirsty developed a deep bond and respect for the locations in which she was working and strove, through her pictures, to 'remind others of their forgotten magic and beauty'. 


She became fascinated with pockets of wild flowers such as the bluebells that would appear for only a few brief weeks of the year. In some cases, she would wait a full 12 months so she could shoot costumes matched to the vivid colours of nature.


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Human Project / War | Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne

Human Project / War | Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

 

"Modern man has become a cog in a very complex society. We live in a society that praises individuality on the one hand and conformity on the other. Man is an elementary particle in the global mass. The Zentai suit fits perfectly with this vision of man as an elementary particle. It makes any individual as uniform as possible. We stop distinguishing between faces, races and genders.

To begin with, the army seemed like a relevant social entity for this series. The army already has a uniform and a color. The individual is subsumed by the larger military corps. This allows me to put these characters into action in nature. I often position myself high above these little men in brightly colored suits. They can make one think of little toy soldiers shot in a hyperrealist panorama."—Jean-Yves Lemoigne

Photo report's insight:

Jean-Yves Lemoigne is a French commercial photographer. Human Project is his personal work, stemming from a desire to capture man in space. The series consists of two different bodies of work, Human Project / War, featured here, and Human Project / Tourism, in which Lemoigne juxtaposes these same suited men with emblematic places of mass tourism.

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Mystical Moments : Kazan | Photographer: Mayumi Hosokura 細倉真弓

Mystical Moments : Kazan | Photographer: Mayumi Hosokura 細倉真弓 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Japanese photographer Mayumi Hosokura was born in Kyoto in 1979. Since graduating from Nihon University of Art in 2005, her work has been shown in many group exhibitions in Japan. Most recently she had a solo show of this work, Kazan, at G/P gallery (http://gptokyo.jp/mayumi-hosokura) in Tokyo.

When asked by Foam Magazine (http://www.foam.org/) what inspires her she replied, ‘I am inspired by common things. I especially love the moment when some common things show a queer side’.

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Mimicry | Photographer: Maurits Giesen & Ilse Leenders

Mimicry | Photographer: Maurits Giesen & Ilse Leenders | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Another great post for color junkies! Dutch photographer duo Maurits Giesen &Ilse Leenders worked together on this Mimicry series. The concept; the uniformity of human beings, people with inconspicuous identities. Just likeanimals they adapt to their environment. Visually in this series it is shown by the use of similar costumes, position and gender.

 

Dutch artists Maurits Giesen and Ilse Leenders first published this series in 2004. Each frame shows the two photographers side by side in highly stylized sets, predominantly colored in primary and secondary shades, depicting an “identity crisis” in the imagery.

The inspiration of the series “Mimicry” came from the uniformity of persons. People from whom the identity is missing and those who are inconspicuous in our society. Just like animals they adapt to their environment. Visually in this series it is shown by the use of similar costumes, position and gender.

On their website, the artists add, “The authority of our work lies in the meticulous care with which we construct and ‘direct’ each shot. We acknowledge the subliminal impact of different genres, from film noir to pulp fiction and graphic novels, but create convincing scenes that invite suspension of disbelief.”


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Photography: What’s real, what’s not and does it matter? | Photographer: Matt Brandon

Photography: What’s real, what’s not and does it matter? | Photographer: Matt Brandon | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I think, the real issue here isn’t what a photographer does or what photography is. The real issue is how we try to define it. Some people, want to define it very narrowly and say photography is for capturing an image of reality. Fine. There are people that use the camera like an office worker uses a xerox machine. If that’s how you want to define it for yourself then that is all well and good. But that’s too narrow for the rest of the world. Likewise, there are people who use a camera like Picasso used a brush. These people are every bit an artist. So, the question really is, either what have you defined as your personal boundaries or what has your profession defined?

 

Look at it this way, if I’m working for the National Geographic magazine they have very strict standards of what can be done with an image once it’s shot. My friend, and Nat Geo photographer, Ami Vitale told me she has to send in the raw files to her editors, completely untouched. In fact, they’re not even allowed to delete files from the card. That’s fine. If that’s the way the magazine wants to do it, and you want to work for the magazine, then you do it their way. You have a choice, their way or the highway. The fact is, there is no right or wrong when it comes to using this tool we call a camera."

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Beaster and Bear | Photographer : Adrain Chesser and Steven Miller

Beaster and Bear | Photographer : Adrain Chesser and Steven Miller | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Adrain Chesser and Steven Miller are both artists in their own right who have been collaborating on photographs, videos and installations for their Beaster and Bear project for over two years now. The two characters at the center of the work are the artists dressed in animal suits who act as trickster figures that expose the shadow side of how we live today. 

 

The work is focused on three central themes: to talk about the environmental impact humankind has on the few remaining forests in the Northwest, to establish a mythology that places marginalized people at the center of their own story, and to honor the multiple ways we as humans experience a living connection with nature and spirituality...

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