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The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe

The Shepherd's Realm | Photographer: Andrew Fladeboe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For The Shepherd’s Realm: Volume III, photographer Andrew Fladeboe captures New Zealand’s courageous working dogs, tracing the historical threads that connect them to the verdant farms and steep hills of the country’s South Island.

 

Fladeboe has dedicated the last few years of his career to chronicling the millennia-long bond fostered between man and dog. Canines, he explains, have been by our side for more than 30,000 years, ensuring not only our prosperity but also our survival. In New Zealand in particular, herding dogs have been a crucial part of the cultural landscape since border collies emigrated from Scotland during the 19th century, and until fifty years ago, the sheep industry was New Zealand’s leading enterprise.

 

The artist explains that although working dogs are rarely petted or allowed inside, they do share a close friendship with the farmers who have trained them. Herding dogs are most often border collies of huntaways, a breed native to New Zealand, and they are bred and raised to be deeply in tune with the farmers. They can comprehend seven whistled commands and often can anticipate the wishes of the shepherd with whom they work side-by-side.

 

 

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India stray dogs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

India stray dogs | Photographer:  Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

English:
"No country has as many stray dogs as India, and no country suffers as much from them. Free-roaming dogs number in the tens of millions and bite millions of people annually, including vast numbers of children. An estimated 20,000 people die every year from rabies infections — more than a third of the global rabies toll."

 - Serge BouvetFrançais: 
"Chaque année, 30.000 personnes meurent chaque année de la rage en Inde (70% des décès dans le monde) à cause de la morsure de chiens parias. Il est estimé qu’en Inde, une personne meurt de la rage à tous les 30 minutes. Environ 70% des victimes sont des enfants de moins de 15 ans."- Serge Bouvet

 

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:34 PM

So sad to see and hear how many stray dogs there are. I was very surprised when I read that India has more stray dogs than most. I would have thought differently, but even with the number of stray dogs I would definitely want to be cautious about knowing the boundaries in abusing/wanting to stop rabies from spreading. Although no one can really stop dogs from breeding and having more puppies, it would be important to maybe start a free vet clinic for the dogs that are in need. I mean by looking at the photo right there, its very sad to see what is going on. Although, I know that it is a struggle already for people in India to feed there families, imagine how the animals are trying to feed for there own. So sad. 

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The Masked Monkeys of Indonesia | Photographer: Ed Wray

The Masked Monkeys of Indonesia | Photographer: Ed Wray | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For the past ten years, Ed Wray has been a photographer for the Associated Press, based in several capitals in Southeast Asia, most recently as Chief photographer in Jakarta. He approaches his work with a keen eye toward transformational situations – “in between” states where people are affected by the energies that change a situation from what was to what will be. We asked him about his Monkey Town series which he photographed in Jakarta.

 

Ed Wray was terrified the first time he encountered a masked monkey. Having lived and worked in Jakarta as a freelance photographer for years, he was accustomed to seeing the animals, cruelly leashed by chains, jumping through hoops or riding trikes on the sidewalks. But for Wray, the mask was a terrifying twist.

 

“When I first saw a monkey with a rubber baby doll’s head stuck over its head as a mask, it immediately struck me as horrifying and beyond weird.” Wray said. “Something about the combination of the doll head – which I think is scary looking to begin with – and a long tail just struck a chord in me.”

 

Read more: http://lightbox.time.com/2011/05/25/the-masked-monkeys-of-indonesia/#ixzz29skcYoSZ

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Beaster and Bear | Photographer : Adrain Chesser and Steven Miller

Beaster and Bear | Photographer : Adrain Chesser and Steven Miller | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Adrain Chesser and Steven Miller are both artists in their own right who have been collaborating on photographs, videos and installations for their Beaster and Bear project for over two years now. The two characters at the center of the work are the artists dressed in animal suits who act as trickster figures that expose the shadow side of how we live today. 

 

The work is focused on three central themes: to talk about the environmental impact humankind has on the few remaining forests in the Northwest, to establish a mythology that places marginalized people at the center of their own story, and to honor the multiple ways we as humans experience a living connection with nature and spirituality...

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Animal | 2014 Sony World Photography Awards Professional

Animal | 2014 Sony World Photography Awards Professional | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Take a look at the Sony World Photography Awards Galleries, where you will find exceptional photographs by some of the most talented photographers in the world. The photographers featured here are Sony World Photography Awards past winners, shortlisted or commended photographers.

 

Introducing the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards Professional, Open and Youth Shortlists

Selected from 139,544 images from 166 countries, WPO today reveals the shortlist for the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards. The highest number of entries in the awards’ seven year history, this year’s jury selected an eclectic shortlist representing the very finest in international contemporary photography from 2013.

 

The judges found within the submissions many stories that force the viewer to find something surprising within the everyday.  Well-documented scenes were approached with fresh and ground-breaking photography styles and are set to inspire other photographers around the world. 

 

Photo report's insight:

Lion and cat : Photographer : George Logan
http://www.georgelogan.co.uk/ ;

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India Song | Fine art photographer: Karen Knorr

India Song | Fine art photographer: Karen Knorr | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Karen Knorr’s past work from the 1980’s onwards took as its theme the ideas of power that underlie cultural heritage, playfully challenging the underlying assumptions of fine art collections in academies and museums in Europe through photography and video. Since 2008 her work has taken a new turn and focused its gaze on the upper caste culture of the Rajput in India and its relationship to the "other" through the use of photography, video and performance. The photographic series considers men's space (mardana) and women's space (zanana) in Mughal and Rajput palace architecture, havelis and mausoleums through large format digital photography.

 

Karen Knorr celebrates the rich visual culture, the foundation myths and stories of northern India, focusing on Rajasthan and using sacred and secular sites to consider caste, femininity and its relationship to the animal world. Interiors are painstakingly photographed with a large format Sinar P3 analogue camera and scanned to very high resolution. Live animals are inserted into the architectural sites, fusing high resolution digital with analogue photography.

 

Animals photographed in sanctuaries, zoos and cities inhabit palaces, mausoleums , temples and holy sites, interrogating Indian cultural heritage and rigid hierarchies. Cranes, zebus, langurs, tigers and elephants mutate from princely pets to avatars of past feminine historic characters, blurring boundaries between reality and illusion and reinventing the Panchatantra for the 21st century.

Photo report's insight:

Karen Knorr was born in Frankfurt am Main, Germany and was raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico in the 1960s. She finished her education in Paris and London. Karen has taught, exhibited and lectured internationally, including at Tate Britain, Tate Modern, The University of Westminster, Goldsmiths, Harvard and The Art Institute of Chicago. She studied at the University of Westminster in the mid-1970s, exhibiting photography that addressed debates in cultural studies and film theory concerning the ‘politics of representation’ practices which emerged during the late 1970s qnd early 1980s. She is currently Professor of Photography at the University for the Creative Arts in Farnham, Surrey.

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Human-Animal | Photographer: Alex Arzt

Human-Animal | Photographer: Alex Arzt | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"These are photographs of real people and the animals, objects, and places that belong to them. The similarities between life forms and the likenesses of our basic drives and behaviors drive me to find my subjects. To me, the indefinable difference between humans and animals is the mystery of animal perception that humans are only able to access through imagination and theory. When we see another living creature, we can never truly know how they perceive us or their environment. Evolution has formed an infinite variety of species all ranging in different types of intelligences, instincts, physical capabilities, and defense mechanisms."

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Dogs in Cars | Photographer : Martin Usborne

Dogs in Cars | Photographer : Martin Usborne | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Martin Usborne lives in central London where he has his photographic studio. He started his photographic career after a number of years working as a creative director in children’s TV. Before that he studied psychology at Edinburgh University and then animation at Glasgow School of Art.

Of this work, MUTE: the silence of dogs in cars’, he writes, ‘I was once left in a car at a young age. I don’t know when or where or for how long, possibly at the age of four, perhaps outside Tesco’s, probably for fifteen minutes only. The details don’t matter. The point is that I wondered if anyone would come back. It seems trivial now but in a child’s mind it is possible to be alone forever. Around the same age I began to feel a deep affinity with animals – in particular their plight at the hands of humans. I remember watching TV and seeing footage of a dog being put in a plastic bag and being kicked. What appalled me most was that the dog could not speak back. It’s muteness terrified me. I should say that I was a well-loved child and never abandoned and yet it is clear that both these experiences arose from the same place deep inside me: a fear of being alone and unheard. Perhaps this is a fear we all share at some level, I am not sure. The images in this series explore that feeling, both in relation to myself and to animals in general.

‘When I started this project I knew the photos would be dark. What I didn’t expect was to see so many subtle reactions by the dogs: some sad, some expectant, some angry, some dejected. It was as if upon opening up a box of grey-coloured pencils I was surprised to see so many shades inside’.

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