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Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova

Days of Night – Nights of Day |Photographer: Elena Chernyshova | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

The documentary was held in Norilsk between February 2012 and February 2013.
The documentary was supported by the Lagardère foundation grant for photography.

« Days of Night – Nights of Day » is about the daily life of the inhabitants of Norilsk, a mining city northernmost of the polar circle with a population of more than 170 000.  The city, its mines and metallurgical factories were constructed by prisoners of the Gulag.  With 60% of the present population involved in the industrial process, this documentary aims to investigate human adaptation to extreme climate, ecological disaster and isolation.
Norilsk is the 7th most polluted city in the world.  The average temperature is -10C, reaching lows of -55C in winter, when for two months the city is plunged into polar night.
The living conditions of the people of Norilsk are unique, making their plight incomparable. - Elena Chernyshova

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Chernobyl's Last Breath | Photographer: Diana Markosian

Chernobyl's Last Breath | Photographer: Diana Markosian | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On April 26, 1986, reactor number four at the Chernobyl nuclear power facility in what is now the Ukraine exploded. 

For years, the Soviet authorities withheld information on Chernobyl, both from its own people and from the rest of the world. 

While many cities, towns and villages were immediately evacuated in the aftermath of the world’s worst nuclear accident, residents of Redkovka, a village just 35 km from the reactor, refused to leave.

Lida and Mikhail Masanovitz, both in their 70s, live in the desolate village. The couple were both born in Redkovka, and never considered moving out, not even after they learned about Chernobyl.

The village today lies almost empty and decrepit. It is classified a zone two, making it too dangerous for anyone to live in. Its remaining residents are living off the land, eking out their silent years in the shadow of Chernobyl.

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Sailboats and Swans | Photographer: Michal Chelbin

Sailboats and Swans | Photographer: Michal Chelbin | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Sailboats and Swans, shot in seven prisons in the Ukraine and Russia over the past six years, explores what it means to be locked and constantly watched. The title refers to the idiosyncratic, and almost mocking, bucolic and fantastical murals and wallpaper backgrounds I found throughout the prisons.

 

These contradictions of life in prison abound in girls’ flowery dress prison uniforms, murderers working as nannies to other women’s babies in the new mothers’ prison, young girls serving time alongside grandmothers – perhaps witness to their own futures, and the mesmerizing human blend of fear and cruelty in the boys’ and mens’ prison – where big tattooed bodies are now zombie-like, worn down by the daily travails of trying to survive being locked up in a world devoid of hope.—Michal Chelbin

 

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Karelia, Russia | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Karelia, Russia | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Karelia, the land of the Karelian peoples, is an area in Northern Europe of historical significance for Finland, Russia, and Sweden. 
It is currently divided between the Russian Republic of Karelia, the Russian Leningrad Oblast, and Finland."  - Steve McCurry


Steve McCurry, photojournalist, displays his recent work in essay form as well as offering a gallery of well-known work.

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Goodbye My Chechnya | Photographer: Diana Markosian

Goodbye My Chechnya | Photographer: Diana Markosian | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For young girls in Chechnya the most innocent acts could mean breaking the rules.A Chechen girl caught smoking is cause for arrest; while rumors of a couple having sex before marriage can result in an honor killing.

The few girls who dare to rebel become targets in the eyes of Chechen authorities.After nearly two decades of vicious war and 70 years of Soviet rule, during which religious participation was banned, modern-day Chechnya is going through Islamic revival. The Chechen government is building mosques in every village, prayer rooms in public schools, and enforcing a stricter Islamic dress code for both men and women. This photo essay chronicles the lives of young Muslim girls who witnessed the horrors of two wars and are now coming of age in a republic that is rapidly redefining itself as a Muslim state. - Diana Markosian

Photo report's insight:

The Russian republic of Chechnya has been undergoing an Islamic revival. Having existed under Soviet rule for 70 years before getting caught up in a war with the Russian Federation that lasted almost two decades, the tiny state has turned to Islam in what looks to be an attempt to maintain some semblance of identity and drive a wedge between itself and the land of Putin. The Chechen government is building mosques in every village, prayer rooms in public schools, and enforcing a stricter Islamic dress code for both men and women. It might be miles away from Islamabad, but Chechnya's gone Islamamad.

For young women in particular, this has led to a change in what they can expect to do with their lives. Smoking, for instance, is definitely a good reason to spend a night in jail, while premarital sex must seem less attractive when the president of your country has given his public approval to any family who feels like carrying out an honor killing.

Photographer Diana Markosian spent some time in the area getting to know a group of Muslim girls who grew up during the wars, chronicling their coming of age in a region that is rapidly redefining itself as an Islamic state.

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Khanh Fleshman's curator insight, December 6, 2013 8:54 AM

This appears on my page because it shows the troubles of women in countries like Chechnya and how hard every day life is for them. People that could benefit from reading this are women in countries that may take their rights and freedoms for granted, because it provides the perspective of women who are forced to live in these restricting conditions. This relates to Half the Sky because the book also illustrates how easy it is for women in these societies to make perceived transgressions in the eyes of the men.

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Distant and Close | Photographer: Alla Mirovskaya

Distant and Close | Photographer: Alla Mirovskaya | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“I am Alla Mirovskaya, independent photographer from Moscow (Russia). I am looking for own place in contemporary photography now. My great interest – is the Documentary photography. I would like to research such themes as personality, human relationships, family, identity, time, and memory.

Now I am studying on the course “Photography as a research”, The Foundation of Cultural and Informational Projects FotoDepartament, Saint-Petersburg (www.fotodepartament.ru). My photostory “Distant and Close” – is my course work. It is the personal story, the starting point for it was the search for understanding between me and my family, the need to under standand review my own impression of my family members and our relationships.”

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