PHOTOGRAPHERS
Follow
Find tag "Japanese"
33.0K views | +11 today
PHOTOGRAPHERS
News about photography
Curated by Photo report
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

I used to be you | Photographer: Kyoko Hamada

I used to be you | Photographer: Kyoko Hamada | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Kyoko Hamada’s Self Portraits Imagine What Her Life Will be Like in 30 Years

 

"When I first tried on her gray wig, the latex makeup, and her clothes, I gazed at the mirror for a long time. My initial reaction was to chuckle, but I started feeling a little uneasy soon after. The wrinkled face staring back at me resembled my own with thirty-plus years added to it. When I smiled, she smiled back at me. When I pouted, she pouted too."

"It was the first time I had met her, but she was simultaneously someone I already knew quite well and someone I knew nothing about. It has been a year and half since I started photographing Kikuchiyo-san and I have gotten used to dressing up as her. However, when I think of what could happen if we ran into each other in a crowded train station or during a walk in the park, I get uneasy imagining her say, “I used to be you.”—Kyoko Hamada

Photo report's insight:

Brooklyn-based photographer Kyoko Hamada steps out of her comfort zone in her latest series I Used to be You. Her work often consists of ordinary people and objects that she stages into quiet moments that explore various metaphors, but this time around Hamada turns the camera on herself to capture Kikuchiyo-san, the future version of herself. The series was born after Hamada spent time volunteering as a visitor to various seniors in NYC. When she discovered that none of the seniors she was working with were interested in being photographed, she decided to experiment on herself. The project turned into an exploration of aging, memory, and the different phases of life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Lonely planet Kamagasaki | Photographer: Shiho Fukada

Lonely planet Kamagasaki | Photographer: Shiho Fukada | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“There is no work now. If big companies like Toyota are firing people, why should there be any work here for us? If big banks in the U.S. collapse, why should there be any work here for us? “  says Hiroshi Nakao, 59 year old, former construction day laborer, who currently survives by picking through garbage and selling what he can.  

 

He is one of the hundreds of graying men in Kamagasaki, Osaka, Japan. It used to be a thriving day laborer’s town. Today it is home to about 25,000 mainly elderly former day laborers, with an estimated 1,300 who are homeless. It used to be called a “laborers town” but now it’s called a “welfare town” – a dumping ground of old men.

 

Alcoholism, poverty, street death, suicide, TB and most of all loneliness prevail here. They don’t have family ties and live and die alone as social outcasts from the mainstream “salary man” culture."- Shiho Fukada

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Dark Isolation, Tokyo | Photographer: Salvi Danes

Dark Isolation, Tokyo | Photographer: Salvi Danes | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"There is an undeniable nucleus of initial interest, a question that from the occidental perspective is easy to think about. How does a society really live, each of its members, in a human and social organization which is apparently exemplary and with an enviable lifestyle? There is a feeling that despite enjoying all the comforts of a modern society, the inhabitants of Tokyo are far away from what was, conventionally, understood as an ideal of happiness.

It is easy to find oneself isolated and alone among a crowd. Enjoying the comfort and economic safety is not a synonym of complete personal realization. A frenetic pace of life can ruin any personal initiative and any possibility of creative life.

 

From this clash, I could observe a dislocation of the people of this huge metropolis, as if they did not strike a balance between feeling isolated and alone among the crowd.

To sum up, the paradox was solved in a manifestation of solitude, in a great distress, in a sensation of individual frustration. Was that possible to detect and turn it into images? A difficulty due to the fact that I had to face up a perception of a completely subjective and debatable reality. It is not easy to show the breathlessness of the Taboo, the passive attitude or the nightmare of routine."—Salvi Danes

 

Salvi Danes is a Spanish photographer based in Barcelona, Spain. His work has been honored by the Lucie Foundation, Sony World Photography, IPA, and many others. This work is from his series, Dark Isolation: Tokyo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Shibuya | Photographer: Adam Hinton

Shibuya | Photographer: Adam Hinton | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"At the beginning of the year I visited Tokyo to work on a small project of portraits of commuters. Little did I know about the terrible events that would befall Japan two months later. The idea was to produce a series of observations of people going to work en mass but with each individual also reflecting on their own personal world, catching moments where the subject is both present and absent. It's a bit different for me in that it has no political comment but I felt the need to free myself from this for a change. I arrived on the 'Coming of Age Day' when those who have reached the age of 18 receive gifts at the local town halls. These are where the kimono portraits were taken." (Adam Hinton)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Fashion | Fashion photographer: Nagi Sakai

Fashion | Fashion photographer: Nagi Sakai | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Born in Tokyo and raised in Cairo, Nagi Sakai’s eclectic background lent him the opportunity to experience art in several cultures at a young age. His expertise and
appreciation for creative expression led him to the Dutch Institute of Art to study painting at the age 7.


At 16 Nagi knew he was destined for photography after encountering famed Japanese photographer Naoki Ishizaka. Nagi contributes to Arena, Rodeo, ELLE UK, ELLE France, D magazine, German GQ, Japanese GQ, French Glamour, German Glamour, Wonderland and Vogue UK.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Gaijin | Fine art photographer: David Favrod

Gaijin | Fine art photographer: David Favrod | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Gaijin is a japanese word meaning "the foreigner"

«For a Swiss, I am a Japanese and for a Japanese I am a Swiss or rather a gaijin.»

My name is David "Takashi" Favrod. I was born on the 2nd of July 1982 in Kobe, Japan, of a Japanese mother and a Swiss father. When I was 6 months old, my parents decided to come and live in Switzerland, more precisely in Vionnaz, a little village in lower Valais.

As my father had to travel for his work a lot, I was mainly brought up by my mother who taught me her principles and her culture.

When I was 18, I asked for double nationality at the Japanese embassy, but they refused, because it is only given to Japanese women who wish to obtain their husband’s nationality.


It is from this feeling of rejection and also from a desire to prove that I am as Japanese as I am Swiss that this work was created.

“Gaijin” is a fictional narrative, a tool for my quest for identity, where self-portraits imply an intimate and solitary relationship that I have with myself. The mirror image is frozen in a figurative alter ego that serves as an anchor point.The aim of this work is to create “my own Japan”, in Switzerland, from memories of my journeys when I was small, my mother’s stories, popular and traditional culture and my grandparents war narratives.- David Favrod


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Bangladesh, ship business | Photojournalist | Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Bangladesh, ship business | Photojournalist | Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Ship breaking yards are the last resting place for end of life ships. At these yards, ships are scrapped, primarily for their steel content.
Until 1980s, ship breaking took place in the developed countries such as the United States, UK, and Europe. Today, however, most ship breaking yards are in developing nations, principally Bangladesh, China, and India, due to lower labor costs and less stringent environmental regulations dealing with the disposal of lead paint and other toxic substances.


Every year 600-700 sea vessels are brought to the beaches of Asia for scrapping and 52% of large ships are scrapped in Bangladesh.
Workers have no unions, no safety equipment, and no training. About 50 are said to die in accidents each year; often in explosions set off by blowtorches deep inside the fume-filled holds.

Photo report's insight:

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Mystical Moments : Kazan | Photographer: Mayumi Hosokura 細倉真弓

Mystical Moments : Kazan | Photographer: Mayumi Hosokura 細倉真弓 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Japanese photographer Mayumi Hosokura was born in Kyoto in 1979. Since graduating from Nihon University of Art in 2005, her work has been shown in many group exhibitions in Japan. Most recently she had a solo show of this work, Kazan, at G/P gallery (http://gptokyo.jp/mayumi-hosokura) in Tokyo.

When asked by Foam Magazine (http://www.foam.org/) what inspires her she replied, ‘I am inspired by common things. I especially love the moment when some common things show a queer side’.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Yakuza | Photographer: Anton Kusters

Yakuza | Photographer: Anton Kusters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"YAKUZA is a personal visual account of the life inside an inaccessible subculture: a traditional Japanese crime family that controls the streets of Kabukicho, in the heart of Tokyo, Japan.

Through 10 months of negotiations with the Shinseikai, my brother Malik and I became one of the only westerners ever to be granted this kind of access to the closed world of Japanese organized crime."

"With a mix of photography, film, writing and graphic design, I try to share not only their complex relationship to Japanese society, but also to show the personal struggle of being forced to live in two different worlds at the same time; worlds that often have conflicting morals and values. It turns out not to be a simple ‘black’ versus ‘white’ relationship, but most definitely one with many, many, many shades of grey." (Anton Kusters)

 

Anton Kusters is a Belgium-based photographer specializing in long-term projects. In 2011, he published his first photobook on the Yakuza, the Japanese organized crime families, that he photographed for two years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

TOKYO COMPRESSION | Photography : MICHAEL WOLF

TOKYO COMPRESSION | Photography : MICHAEL WOLF | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With "Tokyo Compression" Michael Wolf struck a nerve. His portraits of people who are on their way in the Tokyo subway, constrained between glass, steel and fellow travelers, have won many awards and were shown in exhibitions around the globe. The first edition of this book was sold out after a few weeks.

And the topic kept haunting Michael Wolf as well. He returned to Tokyo in order to immerse in the subsurface insanity once again and this time even deeper. Now with "Tokyo Compression Revisited" the second, completely revised edition of the classic is published, with many so far unreleased images and an entirely new "hidden track" at the end of the book.

Before Michael Wolf other artists have created subway series, among them famous names such as Bruce Davidson and Walker Evans, the concept as well as the metonymy of "Compression" however is new. Michael Wolf is not interested in seat cushions, graffiti, interior architecture or the traveler’s relation to that. He rather discovered the subway system as suitable place in order to investigate mental state and aggregate condition of the city people. Wolf leaves out all accessories, focuses just faces and figures. With his radical aesthetics he creates enormously intensive pictures that in a distressing, yes shocking manner directly aim into the portrayed people’s inner life.

With his accompanying essay TOKYO SUBWAY DREAMS Christian Schüle delivers a gloomy diagnosis to the mass loneliness in modern megacities.

Tokyo Compression Revisited

 

more...
No comment yet.