PHOTOGRAPHERS
64.4K views | +12 today
Follow
PHOTOGRAPHERS
News about photography
Curated by Photo report
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

India As I See It: Incredible Photos That Capture The Madness And Magic Of India

India As I See It: Incredible Photos That Capture The Madness And Magic Of India | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
For you, the native Indian, my perspective may seem trivial. Yet, I try to give you photographs charged with life and strange moments.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Analyse d’une photo : le rêveur de Kathputli Colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe

Analyse d’une photo : le rêveur de Kathputli Colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Le tabou pointant la frontière entre l’aspect artistique et l’aspect documentaire de la photographie est le cadet de mes soucis. Je n’ai pas tendance à minimiser l’aspect artistique de mes photos. En ce qui me concerne, le dispositif esthétique prévaut autant que le sujet traité, surtout dans le cadre d’un portrait. Petit retour sur un portrait pris à Kathputli Colony.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui

Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Homes in the village of Denganmal in western India do not have running water. The only drinking water comes from two wells at the foot of a hill outside the village. The well is often so crowded that the walk and wait can take hours in the sweltering heat.

Photo report's insight:

"I am a television news correspondent turned photographer, working for Reuters in Mumbai. I was brought up in the Indian capital Delhi but have been posted in Mumbai since summer 2010. With Reuters, I made my foray into professional photography. I've been learning something new about photography everyday on the job. Apart from taking pictures to go with the daily news, I have a keen interest in shooting in depth features and multimedia."- Danish Siddiqui

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

L’histoire de Bilji, le Hijra de Kathputli Colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe

L’histoire de Bilji, le Hijra de Kathputli Colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Les bracelets roses de Bilji s’entrechoquent lorsqu’elle allume sa deuxième cigarette. Elle tire une taffe. Engoncée dans son pashmînâ pourpre qu’elle ne porte que pendant les fraîcheurs matinales, Bilji fait figure d’un chef sioux. Un chef sioux orné de bijoux de femmes.
Des volutes de fumée de tabac remontent à la surface de ses souvenirs.

« J’appartenais à la « famille » Kinar Bhadur Gad.» raconte Bilji en tapotant de son gros index noueux sa cigarette pour en faire tomber la cendre.
« J’ai rejoint le foyer de mon guru-ji, quand j’avais 16 ans. Mes parents ne m’ont pas retenu quand je suis parti rejoindre ma nouvelle famille. »

La plupart des habitants du bidonville sont issus d’une grande famille originaire du Rajasthan. Bijli est née à New Delhi. Son père, d’origine modeste, faisait bouillir la marmite familiale en vendant du thé.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Usually, in India, the Muslim segregated areas are seen as ghettos. However, these should be seen as cultural pockets, where group solidarity is strong. Turkman Gate is the old city around which the New Delhi city has come up. It would be wrong to brand whole of Turkman Gate as a ghetto, as it houses various wholesale markets and different communities as well. Ghettos are usually formed by new migrants to the city to hold on to their culture in an alien environment. People have been living here since centuries; they are the real residents of Delhi city and still follow age-old ‘Delhi culture." Serge Bouvet

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

India | Photographer: Jason Wallis

India | Photographer: Jason Wallis | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jason Wallis is an editorial and advertising photographer based in Birmingham, Alabama. He recently returned from a trip to Northern India to document, through portraits, the work ofNever Thirst, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing clean water to those who have none. Of the series, he says: “India is such a paradoxical place for me. It’s one of the dirtiest places I have ever been, with the most vibrant colors and people I have ever met. I met villagers that had never seen white men before. The Indian people are a curious sort, so we drew crowds every time we showed up in a village and pulled out our gear. I can only imagine what they were thinking seeing these ghosts of men pulling out their flashing lights!”

more...
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 2014 4:44 PM

I was fascinated by looking at some of the pictures that this amazing photographer took. You can really get a sense of what the photographer was trying to capture and the sense of feel throughout the pictures. 

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

La photographie est le meilleur moyen d’apprécier l’exotisme de nos voyages. A en juger d’après les photos sur les réseaux sociaux, le voyage est devenu un sujet incontournable. On n’affiche pas avec la même fierté d’évasion notre dernier voyage réalisé et le dernier achat de bien effectué. La photographie de voyage connaît malheureusement quelques écueils comme les lieux communs. La banalité n’est pas inévitable. Voici donc 20 conseils pour afficher une vision plus personnelle de la photographie de voyage.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta

In the Shadows of Kolkata | Photographer: Souvid Datta | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“My first inspirations were world-changers like James Nachtwey, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry. I firmly believe that photography has a role to play in provoking thought, spurring dialogue, and prompting action—therein being a potentially potent ingredient in an antidote to social evils.

“Photographs are informative, a record of what we do and value, and contribute important subjective testimonies for history.

 

That said, worldwide trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with over 700,000 women moved across international borders annually. It is not at all realistic to imagine photos making any substantial dent to improve this situation. The photos I take will do little to directly improve the lives of women and children in Sonagachi.

 

“To do this would take massive political, economic and legal overhauls, not to mention years of reshaping social values. This was one of my hardest realizations when following apparently humanistic callings. That images can, however, give people a voice and better inform a public debate, is some journalistic consolation. What makes it immediately worthwhile for me is the experience of earning an individual’s trust, and for a while, touching lives, sharing stories and learning from each other in a dignified, respectful, curious manner. This is the only honest thing I can convince people of offering them, and surprisingly it is also what seems to open the most doors for me.” - Souvid Datta

Photo report's insight:

Mumbai-born photographer Souvid Datta is a young man of 21 whose age puts him somewhere in between the subjects he’s been documenting in the infamous red-light district of Kolkata, India and the subjects’ children. His series, In the Shadows of Kolkata, portrays a close-knit group of female sex workers, a few of their clients, and their children. Exploring the lives of sex workers as a photographic “theme” never fails to affect, and seeing children interspersed into this work adds another layer of difficult material to digest, question, process

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet

Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nothing better reflects the strangeness of a people than the environment in which he lives. So I decided to import a part of India in Europe, framed in a bus shelter or ad showcase to create an open-air museum. Sometimes it coexists funny interaction between the two dimensions. These photos are a poetry of Rajasthan." - Serge Bouvet

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Chandraprabhu Temple | Travel photograher: Serge Bouvet

Chandraprabhu Temple | Travel photograher: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Impossible de contempler les merveilles du sanctuaire de Chandraprabhu tant il y a de monde; ce sont des touristes indiens pour la plupart ou des adeptes religieux. Néanmoins, je sympathise avec les moines Jaïns qui en apprenant que je suis photographe me commande un ensemble de photos. J’accepte. J’ai rendez-vous avec eux à 5h30 du matin. Le temple est vide. Il y fait très sombre. J’ai avec moi, 4 flashs Canon Speedlite 580EX II, un réflecteur, un trépied et 50 roupies de pourboire pour les prêtres.  Je commence à photographier toutes les fresques et  Stambha (colonne sculptée) fébrilement. Je dois faire vite car à 7h00, il y aura du monde. (...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Sadhûs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Sadhûs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

In Hinduism, sadhu is a common term for an ascetic or someone who practices yoga. Sadhus have given up trying to achieve the first three Hindu goals of life: kama (enjoyment), artha (practical objectives) and even dharma (duty). The sadhu is solely dedicated to achieving moksha (liberation) through meditation and contemplation of God. Sadhus often wear ochre-colored clothing, as a symbol that they have given up many things in life.

Serge Bouvet present some portraits of these particular hindouists.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Dream Mumbai | Photographer: Kainaz Amaria

Dream Mumbai | Photographer: Kainaz Amaria | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dream Mumbai is a project born out of a survival instinct. When I first arrived to Mumbai my senses were on overload. Even the simplest of tasks – crossing the street or buying a piece of fruit – struck me with a tinge of terror. In order to acclimate myself to the city I began taking long walks with a camera. The walks made me familiar with her neighboring geography. The images helped me understand the people living in the neighborhoods.

Collectively the images create a visual diary – pixel moments, but also a statement on the complexities of a developing dreamland. Mumbai is a city with constant contradictions; it can fill and crush your soul in the very same moment. These images offer a glimpse into the variety of daily emotions and landscapes one can witness whilst walking the streets of Mumbai.

Photo report's insight:

Ever since she was young, Kainaz has been keenly curious about everything and everyone around her. She loves meeting new people, entering unfamiliar situations and listening to new perspectives.

 

Kainaz has a B. A. in international relations and political science from Boston University and an M.A. in photography from the School of Visual Communication, Ohio University. In 2010 she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to Mumbai, India.

 

Her images and multimedia collaborations have been recognized by contests including CPOY, Women in Photojournalism, Atlanta Photojournalism Conference, the National Press Photographers' Contest and the South Asian Journalist Association. She was named a Chips Quinn Scholar in 2007 and was a graduate teaching assistant at Ohio University.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

The Fujifilm X System | Photographer: Matt Brandon

The Fujifilm X System | Photographer: Matt Brandon | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

There’s a lot of talk these days, both good and bad, about the Fujifilm X Series cameras: the X-Pro1 and the X-E1.  I’ve been using the X-Pro1 for exactly one year now. Back when I first gave my initial impressions I wasn’t sure how I would feel about this camera long term. Well, the jury is out and the verdict is I love it… a lot!


So much so, I took it for a month of shooting, an assignment in Africa for The Kilgoris Project then to India for my latest Rajasthan Photo workshop. In Africa I used both my X-Pro1 and my Canon 5D MKIII. Why? Fujifilm just doesn’t have the lenses for this little guy to go on Safari. But, then even my 70-200 mm with a 2x converter didn’t really deliver on the safari either. The main reason for being in Africa was The Kilgoris Project.


I shot this assignment completely with the X-Pro1 and only two lenses: the Fujinon XF35mmF1.4 R and theXF18mmF2 R.  After Africa I went to India to lead my workshop where I shot exclusively the X-Pro1. The main difference in India was I was able to borrow Piet Van den Eynde’s new XF14mmF2.8 R and this helped with any frustration I was having not being able to shoot wide enough. Remember, the X-Pro1 and the X-E1 are both cropped APS-C sensors and thus a 18 mm is a 27 mm in a 35mm equivalent..."- 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

I'am French photographer - YouTube

Photos & Vidéos: Serge Bouvet Cities: Jodhpur, Delhi, Jaisalmer, Varanasi, Pushkar, Bikaner, Jaipur Mixed by: Serge Bouvet More photos at: sergebouvet.com
more...
Clipping Path India's comment, March 9, 5:23 AM
Its nice!
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Corporates | Photographer: Ritam Banerjee

Corporates | Photographer: Ritam Banerjee | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Ritam Banerjee is an Indian photographer, specialising in a variety of fields such as travel, fashion, photojournalism, advertising, interiors, portraits and automobiles, among others. He started pursuing photography in 1996. A freelance photographer, Ritam also works with and is globally represented by Getty Images.

Photo report's insight:

Based out of Mumbai, Ritam has never quite understood the need to create a niche. Shooting extensively across categories—travel, photojournalism, advertising, interiors, portraits, automobiles, fashion, food—he has always sought inspiration and challenge in variety. From training his lens at the blazing dome of the Taj Palace & Tower when Mumbai was under siege in 2008 to documenting the placid course of the middle and lower Ganges, Ritam has framed things as disparate as spas and slums, ketchup and cars. Over the last decade, Ritam has worked with corporates and publications across continents, and has also been associated with the global agency, Getty Images. Apart from stills, he shoots commercial AVs, and has recently worked as a cinematographer for a feature film. Ritam has also been in the news for his theme-based calendars and his exhibitions. - Ritam Banerjee

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita

Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

"Serge Bouvet first went to India in 2012 with the plan to make a photo project about the hijras – a term used in Southeast Asia to define transgender people. But while documenting this story he discovered something else: the openness and beauty of the Muslim community living in the Turkman Gate old city in Delhi. Bouvet decided to photograph the Muslim men he met. And I talked to him about this project, about how he got the idea and about the way he approaches the people he photographs."- Bianca Olivia Nita

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi

Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On a hot afternoon in June 2008, Italian photographer Alessandro Vincenzi jumped in to a black and yellow taxi, headed to a deserted parking lot meant for trucks. It was his last day in Mumbai. Normally accompanied by his local fixer, Anil, who was unavailable on this particular day, Vincenzi decided to spend the rest of his day wandering with his camera. After about 40 minutes in the taxi, Vincenzi reached the park and saw an old and abandoned warehouse; he asked the driver to wait outside while he went into the building.

Once inside, there was almost no light and Vincenzi was unable to see much, but he continued to walk through the rooms, following the few voices he could hear in the distance. “After few seconds I felt something strange under my feet, as if I was walking on the top of a mattress,” Vincenzi explained to me. A few moments later when Vincenzi looked at the ground, he realized that he was treading upon a bed made of condoms; in the corner, there was an actual mattress with a transgender woman standing on it. As she began to approach him, Vincenzi realized that he was mistaken for a ‘client’ and explained, using his camera, that he was only a photographer. Once she understood, they both walked away and returned to work, not minding each other’s presence...

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L.

Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Beyond is a documentary by filmmaker Cale Glendening which follows my assistant Ryan and I as we complete our latest photo series in Varanasi, India- "Holy Men." Although not much technical information is discussed in this particular featurette, my goal is to inspire you and give you insight into what goes into one of my personal projects. Almost every major religion breeds ascetics; wandering monks who have renounced all earthly possessions, dedicating their lives to the pursuit of spiritual liberation.Their reality is dictated only by the mind, not material objects. Even death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion." - JOEY L.

more...
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:27 PM

The video/pictures are very cool and interesting to see. You get to see what the people go threw. Although its not very much an educational purpose to this, you get to see the work that this artist did. Job well done.

Lensicle's curator insight, December 1, 2014 11:32 AM

Amazing shot!

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.

Photo report's insight:

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 13, 2014 5:09 AM

Police corruption in india

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

India stray dogs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

India stray dogs | Photographer:  Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

English:
"No country has as many stray dogs as India, and no country suffers as much from them. Free-roaming dogs number in the tens of millions and bite millions of people annually, including vast numbers of children. An estimated 20,000 people die every year from rabies infections — more than a third of the global rabies toll."

 - Serge BouvetFrançais: 
"Chaque année, 30.000 personnes meurent chaque année de la rage en Inde (70% des décès dans le monde) à cause de la morsure de chiens parias. Il est estimé qu’en Inde, une personne meurt de la rage à tous les 30 minutes. Environ 70% des victimes sont des enfants de moins de 15 ans."- Serge Bouvet

 

more...
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:34 PM

So sad to see and hear how many stray dogs there are. I was very surprised when I read that India has more stray dogs than most. I would have thought differently, but even with the number of stray dogs I would definitely want to be cautious about knowing the boundaries in abusing/wanting to stop rabies from spreading. Although no one can really stop dogs from breeding and having more puppies, it would be important to maybe start a free vet clinic for the dogs that are in need. I mean by looking at the photo right there, its very sad to see what is going on. Although, I know that it is a struggle already for people in India to feed there families, imagine how the animals are trying to feed for there own. So sad. 

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Jisu Asrham| Photographer: Javier Arcenillas

Jisu Asrham| Photographer: Javier Arcenillas | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Only a hundred miles from Kolkata, but immersed in a jungle in which time seems to stand still, a Jesuit missionary group has expanded the meaning of being called “parents”.

In its mission “Jisu Ashram” hosts over a hundred children from families of agriculturists of lower castes. There are a thousand children and parents to represent the only hope for the future of a new generation of young Indians who are suffering, with concealed virulence, an abrupt transition to the modern era, the era of big cities, which work in the field and differ little from slavery.

Photo report's insight:

Humanist. Freelance photographer, member of Gea Photowords.

He develops humanitarian essays where the main characters are integrated in societies that border and set upon any reason or human right in a world that becomes increasingly more and more indifferent.

He is a psychologist at the Complutense University of Madrid. He has won several international prizes, including The Arts Press Award, Kodak Young Photographer, European Social Fund Grant, Euro Press of Fujifilm, Make History, UNICEF, SONY WPY, Fotoevidence POYI.

Currently he is carrying out new ideas in parallel with traditional journalism to spread his projects, and he is making up Audiovisual Projects with diplomatic work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Mumbai Sleeping | Photography: Dhruv Dhawan

Mumbai Sleeping | Photography: Dhruv Dhawan | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

I began photographing Mumbai Sleeping in the summer of 2009 to explore the diversity of a basic human experience such as sleep. I was in awe of the taxi drivers in particular who slept in such a romantic balance with their vehicles after leaving their families in the rural parts of India to make a living in the city of dreams. 

I was also motivated by the opportunity to photograph people while they are unaware of the camera and to remove the politics of the pose from my images. In this sense I liked to believe I was capturing portraits of the unconscious. 

Of the few people that awoke while I was photographing them, no one objected to my actions after I explained what I was doing. I remain ever grateful to India and its people that allow artists to capture real life without the politics of consent.

Over 350 images later I still find myself compelled to document this phenomena of urbanization in the 21st century where space has become so scarce in a city like Mumbai that 'private' acts are often conducted in public. Mumbai Sleeping is a testament to the strength and human spirit of the lower class urban population that drive the wheel of the city by day and sleep on it at night - forcing us to question whether a good night’s sleep is a luxury or a necessity.

more...
Debbie Lynch's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:24 PM

Dhru Dhawan's photographic investigation of the sleeping night life of Mumbai is intriguing. By exploring a basic human need, sleep, he captures  his subjects with intimacy. His motivation to "photograph people while they are unaware of the camera and to remove the politics of the pose from my images" results in stark images never seen before. One interesting quote he makes is that after "Over 350 images later I still find myself compelled to document this phenomena of urbanization in the 21st century where space has become so scarce in a city like Mumbai that 'private' acts are often conducted in public. Mumbai Sleeping is a testament to the strength and human spirit of the lower class urban population that drive the wheel of the city by day and sleep on it at night - forcing us to question whether a good night’s sleep is a luxury or a necessity." I think this statement says much about the motivations of the modern world and how we view "necessities when faced with few options.

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Muslims in Britain | Photojournalist: Justin Jin

Muslims in Britain | Photojournalist: Justin Jin | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"From humble beginnings fifty years ago, when men from Pakistan and India arrived to take up factory jobs in England, the Muslim community has grown to become a significant force in the British society.

Today, generations of Muslims live happily as British citizens, study and working side-by-side with the whites. Yet harmony is being eroded by terrorism and a growing siege mentality. In the impoverished north, where crumbled textile factories stand as stark reminders of better days, Muslims confine themselves to bleak, isolated quarters." - Justin Jin

Commissioned by M Magazine of Holland.

more...
No comment yet.