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Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui

Second wives in western India | Photographer: Danish Siddiqui | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Homes in the village of Denganmal in western India do not have running water. The only drinking water comes from two wells at the foot of a hill outside the village. The well is often so crowded that the walk and wait can take hours in the sweltering heat.

Photo report's insight:

"I am a television news correspondent turned photographer, working for Reuters in Mumbai. I was brought up in the Indian capital Delhi but have been posted in Mumbai since summer 2010. With Reuters, I made my foray into professional photography. I've been learning something new about photography everyday on the job. Apart from taking pictures to go with the daily news, I have a keen interest in shooting in depth features and multimedia."- Danish Siddiqui

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Corporates | Photographer: Ritam Banerjee

Corporates | Photographer: Ritam Banerjee | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Ritam Banerjee is an Indian photographer, specialising in a variety of fields such as travel, fashion, photojournalism, advertising, interiors, portraits and automobiles, among others. He started pursuing photography in 1996. A freelance photographer, Ritam also works with and is globally represented by Getty Images.

Photo report's insight:

Based out of Mumbai, Ritam has never quite understood the need to create a niche. Shooting extensively across categories—travel, photojournalism, advertising, interiors, portraits, automobiles, fashion, food—he has always sought inspiration and challenge in variety. From training his lens at the blazing dome of the Taj Palace & Tower when Mumbai was under siege in 2008 to documenting the placid course of the middle and lower Ganges, Ritam has framed things as disparate as spas and slums, ketchup and cars. Over the last decade, Ritam has worked with corporates and publications across continents, and has also been associated with the global agency, Getty Images. Apart from stills, he shoots commercial AVs, and has recently worked as a cinematographer for a feature film. Ritam has also been in the news for his theme-based calendars and his exhibitions. - Ritam Banerjee

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Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Usually, in India, the Muslim segregated areas are seen as ghettos. However, these should be seen as cultural pockets, where group solidarity is strong. Turkman Gate is the old city around which the New Delhi city has come up. It would be wrong to brand whole of Turkman Gate as a ghetto, as it houses various wholesale markets and different communities as well. Ghettos are usually formed by new migrants to the city to hold on to their culture in an alien environment. People have been living here since centuries; they are the real residents of Delhi city and still follow age-old ‘Delhi culture." Serge Bouvet

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India | Photographer: Jason Wallis

India | Photographer: Jason Wallis | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jason Wallis is an editorial and advertising photographer based in Birmingham, Alabama. He recently returned from a trip to Northern India to document, through portraits, the work ofNever Thirst, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing clean water to those who have none. Of the series, he says: “India is such a paradoxical place for me. It’s one of the dirtiest places I have ever been, with the most vibrant colors and people I have ever met. I met villagers that had never seen white men before. The Indian people are a curious sort, so we drew crowds every time we showed up in a village and pulled out our gear. I can only imagine what they were thinking seeing these ghosts of men pulling out their flashing lights!”

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 2014 4:44 PM

I was fascinated by looking at some of the pictures that this amazing photographer took. You can really get a sense of what the photographer was trying to capture and the sense of feel throughout the pictures. 

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10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

10 Conseils sur la photographie de voyage | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

La photographie est le meilleur moyen d’apprécier l’exotisme de nos voyages. A en juger d’après les photos sur les réseaux sociaux, le voyage est devenu un sujet incontournable. On n’affiche pas avec la même fierté d’évasion notre dernier voyage réalisé et le dernier achat de bien effectué. La photographie de voyage connaît malheureusement quelques écueils comme les lieux communs. La banalité n’est pas inévitable. Voici donc 20 conseils pour afficher une vision plus personnelle de la photographie de voyage.

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BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman

BOLE SO NIHAL | Photographer: Mark Hartman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

New York City-based photographer Mark Hartman spent most of March and April 2014 in India working on personal projects, including these images from his series “Bole Sol Nihang” portraits of Nihang Sikhs. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab Region in 1469 by the Guru Nanak. There are now 26 million Sikhs living around the world, making it the world’s fifth largest religion. Nihang Sikhs, also known as the “eternal army,” are the army of the 10th Guru of the Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind Singh.

 

The Nihangs and all Sikhs believe all people should have the right to practice any religion and follow any path they choose. Nihangs are known for their fearlessness, bravery and successful victories in battle, even when heavily outnumbered. According to Hartman, their way of life has not changed for more than 300 years, living a “nomadic, spiritual life” that is “unattached to the world.” Thanks to what he calls his “magic powers,” Hartman was granted access to this unique group of Sikhs while he was traveling in Amirtsar and Anandpursahib, in Northern India, Punjab.

 

“I have not seen anyone set up on-location portraits of the Nihang Sikhs,” Hartman writes about the work. “My curiosity and interest in their philosophy fueled my desire to learn more about them, and inspired me to create the work. My favorite photos of them were made well-over 100 years ago. I felt a necessity to make images of them in modern times. I have always loved the portrait work of August Sander and Edward Curtis. Their work is about the subject; nothing else. I choose to photograph these people in a similar, very straightforward manner, working within my vision. I isolated the subject, set up the scene and composition while interacting with the subject, and finally photographed the subject.”

- See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/05/26787#gallery-6

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Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Kathputli colony | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Planners have decreed that the famed Kathputli Colony in India's capital, New Delhi, is to make way for luxury flats and shops 

The roads that lead to it are unpaved, dirty and narrow. The houses are rudimentary and sparse. The meandering alleys, slippery and narrow, are almost a hazard to navigate with an overbearing smell of sewage and wood smoke.

Located in the western part of India’s capital, New Delhi, this slum is known as the Kathputli (or puppeteers’) Colony — though it isn’t just puppeteers who live here. With its origins in a simple encampment for roving and mostly Rajasthani performers, this 50-year-old community today comprises some 3,500 families. They are magicians, snake charmers, acrobats, singers, dancers, actors, traditional healers and musicians as well as puppeteers, and make up what it probably the largest congregation of street performers in the world. Musical instruments — for sale or repair — line the alleys, and a simple chat can turn into a magic show. Days reverberate with song and music, and many houses are crammed with huge puppets and other props.

The local authorities have plans for Kathputli Colony, however.

“Our policy is to give slum dwellers and their children better living conditions, and that’s what we are doing,” says S.K. Jain, director of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the civic body that owns the land where Kathputli Colony stands.

 

So, come April 1, this unique community will disappear to make way for luxury flats and a mall. The residents will be shifted to a nearby transit camp for two years and finally to a new high-rise building, which, the government claims, will be a modern artistes community with facilities to nurture and showcase street art.

 

The residents are skeptical. “How are we going to store our equipment in a cramped flat?” asks Puran Bhat, the oldest resident of the Kathputli Colony and a puppeteer, pointing at the 10-to-15-ft.-high puppets lined up against the wall of his room and spilling over onto a small terrace. “And we have big families.” (In Bhat’s case, there are 18 of them.)

“Our art dictates our lifestyle and our lifestyle is our identity; the lifestyle of a multistory building is not for us,” says Aziz Khan, a magician who made Guinness World Records for his great Indian rope trick in 1995.

Almost everyone in the Kathputli Colony shares these feelings, and many have asked that the community be redeveloped in situ, as a tourist attraction. But the DDA has other plans. “Middle-class India looks upon us as a nuisance, at odds with the image of India as a rising world power,” says Ishamuddin Khan, a street magician whose rope illusion was once ranked among the 50 greatest magic tricks in the world.

 

Meanwhile, Bhat, in his home, works on the script of a play that the residents are planning to perform on the streets of Delhi to protest the demolition of Kathputli Colony. “We perform for the poor as well as the rich, for the Prime Minister as well as the commoner,” Bhat says. “And we have always lived like kings without worrying about the future.”

That freedom, unfortunately, is a luxury that the residents of Kathputli Colony no longer have.


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Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet

Rajasthan 2D | Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nothing better reflects the strangeness of a people than the environment in which he lives. So I decided to import a part of India in Europe, framed in a bus shelter or ad showcase to create an open-air museum. Sometimes it coexists funny interaction between the two dimensions. These photos are a poetry of Rajasthan." - Serge Bouvet

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Monsoon | Photojournalism: Steve McCurry

Monsoon | Photojournalism: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"I was eleven years old when I saw a photo essay on the monsoon in India in Life Magazine by Brian Brake, the New Zealand-born Magnum photographer.

His work established his reputation as a master color photoessayist. Twenty years later, I proposed a story to National Geographic to photograph the monsoon. The next year I joined Magnum Photos.

People have often asked me what it was like spending almost a year photographing the monsoon. I spent several months following the monsoon which affects half the people on the planet.

Weather is often my best ally as I try to capture the perfect mood for my pictures, but photographing the monsoon was an experience that taught me a lot about patience and humility.

 

Photographing in heavy rain is difficult because you have to constantly wipe the rain drops from the camera lens. That takes about a third of the time. Monsoon rain is accompanied by winds that try to wrestle away the umbrella that is wedged between my head and shoulders.

I spent four days, in a flooded city in Gujarat, India, wading around the streets in waist-deep water that was filled with bloated animal carcasses and other waste material. The fetid water enveloped me leaving a greasy film over my clothes and body. Every night when I returned to my flooded hotel, empty except for a nightwatchman, I bathed my shriveled feet in disinfectant.

 

Once I was almost sucked down into one of the holes in the street in Bombay into which water was rushing. It took every bit of my strength to keep from losing my balance. After that close call, I shuffled along, inch by inch, yard by yard, until I had to abandon my cautious instincts.

I had to see the monsoon as a predictable yearly event, and not the disaster it seemed to my western eyes. The farmers experience the monsoon as an almost religious experience as they watch their fields come back to life after being parched for half the year.

 

When I was in Porbundar, the historic birthplace of Gandhi, I came upon a dog. There he was, locked out of the house, standing on a tiny piece of concrete as the flood waters rose. His expression betrayed his emotions. You can tell by the picture that he realizes his predicament and hope his owner opens the door soon.

Actually, a moment after I took the picture, the door opened and he ran inside."- Steve Mccurry

Photo report's insight:

Order Monsoon by Steeve Mccurry:

http://www.amazon.com/Monsoon-Steve-McCurry/dp/0500541353/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1318962167&sr=8-1 ;

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India Song | Fine art photographer: Karen Knorr

India Song | Fine art photographer: Karen Knorr | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Karen Knorr’s past work from the 1980’s onwards took as its theme the ideas of power that underlie cultural heritage, playfully challenging the underlying assumptions of fine art collections in academies and museums in Europe through photography and video. Since 2008 her work has taken a new turn and focused its gaze on the upper caste culture of the Rajput in India and its relationship to the "other" through the use of photography, video and performance. The photographic series considers men's space (mardana) and women's space (zanana) in Mughal and Rajput palace architecture, havelis and mausoleums through large format digital photography.

 

Karen Knorr celebrates the rich visual culture, the foundation myths and stories of northern India, focusing on Rajasthan and using sacred and secular sites to consider caste, femininity and its relationship to the animal world. Interiors are painstakingly photographed with a large format Sinar P3 analogue camera and scanned to very high resolution. Live animals are inserted into the architectural sites, fusing high resolution digital with analogue photography.

 

Animals photographed in sanctuaries, zoos and cities inhabit palaces, mausoleums , temples and holy sites, interrogating Indian cultural heritage and rigid hierarchies. Cranes, zebus, langurs, tigers and elephants mutate from princely pets to avatars of past feminine historic characters, blurring boundaries between reality and illusion and reinventing the Panchatantra for the 21st century.

Photo report's insight:

Karen Knorr was born in Frankfurt am Main, Germany and was raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico in the 1960s. She finished her education in Paris and London. Karen has taught, exhibited and lectured internationally, including at Tate Britain, Tate Modern, The University of Westminster, Goldsmiths, Harvard and The Art Institute of Chicago. She studied at the University of Westminster in the mid-1970s, exhibiting photography that addressed debates in cultural studies and film theory concerning the ‘politics of representation’ practices which emerged during the late 1970s qnd early 1980s. She is currently Professor of Photography at the University for the Creative Arts in Farnham, Surrey.

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Le tabou de la retouche photo en France | Photographe : Serge Bouvet

Le tabou de la retouche photo en France | Photographe : Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"En France, retoucher une photographie est devenue un tabou voire un sacrilège. En ce qui me concerne, sachant que la photo ne sera jamais garante de la transparence du réel, je considère ces controverses sacralisante un peu vaine. Explications(...)"


"(...) Les chiens de garde de la photographie pure, de la photographie objective existait déjà. Parlons-en de ces pourfendeurs de la photographie dite objective. Une certaine caste de photographes a pour dogme que retoucher une photo nuit à l’objectivité. Allons bons ! Et que les photographes qui retravaillent les clichés sont considérés comme des escamoteurs du réel. Si j’en observe l’histoire de la photographie, force est de croire que la polémique sur le sujet n’a pas désenflé puisque le travail quotidien allait et va toujours à l’encontre de ce débat immuable. En effet, dès l’introduction de la photographie dans la presse, au XIXe siècle, les journalistes ont toujours travaillé l’image. L’intervention a posteriori sur le document photographique est attestée dès les débuts de la photographie.(...)


"(...)Je soupçonne ces chiens de garde de la photographie « sans retouche » de souffrir du complexe du bon photographe qui ne rate jamais sa photo. Combien de fois, n’ai-je pas lu dans certains magazines français cette expression  “photo sans retouche” comme d’un label de qualité indiscutable. Pour moi, cela  vise essentiellement à garantir un certain niveau de qualité technique, en signifiant une maîtrise absolu de l’outil pour éviter le recours à des expédients comme Photoshop ou Lightroom. Il laisse par ailleurs sous entendre l’existence d’un photographe parfait, d’un démiurge absolu de l’image reproduite. Allez dire ça à Steve Mc Curry ou Ami Vitale pour qui la post-production, la retouche sont essentielles.(...)" - Serge Bouvet

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Danielle Cadusseau's curator insight, October 3, 2013 4:14 PM

Technique photographique

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Sadhûs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Sadhûs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

In Hinduism, sadhu is a common term for an ascetic or someone who practices yoga. Sadhus have given up trying to achieve the first three Hindu goals of life: kama (enjoyment), artha (practical objectives) and even dharma (duty). The sadhu is solely dedicated to achieving moksha (liberation) through meditation and contemplation of God. Sadhus often wear ochre-colored clothing, as a symbol that they have given up many things in life.

Serge Bouvet present some portraits of these particular hindouists.

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I'am French photographer - YouTube

Photos & Vidéos: Serge Bouvet Cities: Jodhpur, Delhi, Jaisalmer, Varanasi, Pushkar, Bikaner, Jaipur Mixed by: Serge Bouvet More photos at: sergebouvet.com
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Clipping Path India's comment, March 9, 2016 5:23 AM
Its nice!
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Photographer of the Year 2015 | Photojournalist: Jonas Gratzer

Photographer of the Year 2015 | Photojournalist: Jonas Gratzer | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Originally from Stockholm, Gratzer has been living in Bangkok with his wife and son since 2009. He has travelled throughout south-east Asia and the Indian subcontinent, focusing on rights issues such as child labour, human trafficking and women's rights, as well as environmental concerns. He has recently become a Getty Images contributor.

He said: "With my pictures I try to make people aware of what the daily struggle faced by millions of people across the continent. There are so many sides of Asia that are not pleasant. My major concern for the region is that corporations are eating up Asia and spreading like cancer. Many leaders in powerful positions turn a blind eye to what's happening in this part of the world. There is a sort of philosophy of 'money first and what happens next is not our concern.'"

Photo report's insight:

More photos of Jonas Gratzer at: http://www.jonasgratzer.com/

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Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita

Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

"Serge Bouvet first went to India in 2012 with the plan to make a photo project about the hijras – a term used in Southeast Asia to define transgender people. But while documenting this story he discovered something else: the openness and beauty of the Muslim community living in the Turkman Gate old city in Delhi. Bouvet decided to photograph the Muslim men he met. And I talked to him about this project, about how he got the idea and about the way he approaches the people he photographs."- Bianca Olivia Nita

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Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi

Transgender World: Photographer | Alessandro Vincenzi | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

On a hot afternoon in June 2008, Italian photographer Alessandro Vincenzi jumped in to a black and yellow taxi, headed to a deserted parking lot meant for trucks. It was his last day in Mumbai. Normally accompanied by his local fixer, Anil, who was unavailable on this particular day, Vincenzi decided to spend the rest of his day wandering with his camera. After about 40 minutes in the taxi, Vincenzi reached the park and saw an old and abandoned warehouse; he asked the driver to wait outside while he went into the building.

Once inside, there was almost no light and Vincenzi was unable to see much, but he continued to walk through the rooms, following the few voices he could hear in the distance. “After few seconds I felt something strange under my feet, as if I was walking on the top of a mattress,” Vincenzi explained to me. A few moments later when Vincenzi looked at the ground, he realized that he was treading upon a bed made of condoms; in the corner, there was an actual mattress with a transgender woman standing on it. As she began to approach him, Vincenzi realized that he was mistaken for a ‘client’ and explained, using his camera, that he was only a photographer. Once she understood, they both walked away and returned to work, not minding each other’s presence...

 

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Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L.

Beyond: Varanasi India |Photographer: Joey L. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Beyond is a documentary by filmmaker Cale Glendening which follows my assistant Ryan and I as we complete our latest photo series in Varanasi, India- "Holy Men." Although not much technical information is discussed in this particular featurette, my goal is to inspire you and give you insight into what goes into one of my personal projects. Almost every major religion breeds ascetics; wandering monks who have renounced all earthly possessions, dedicating their lives to the pursuit of spiritual liberation.Their reality is dictated only by the mind, not material objects. Even death is not a fearsome concept, but a passing from the world of illusion." - JOEY L.

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:27 PM

The video/pictures are very cool and interesting to see. You get to see what the people go threw. Although its not very much an educational purpose to this, you get to see the work that this artist did. Job well done.

Lensicle's curator insight, December 1, 2014 11:32 AM

Amazing shot!

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Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel

Mädchenland | Photographer: Karolin Klüppel | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Few kilometers from the border of India, German photographer Karolin Klüppel discovered the tiny, isolated village of Mawlynnong where ‘girls rule the world’. Made up of only 92 dwellings in the East Khasi Hills, the town uniquely operates as a matrilinear society, each family’s lineage traced through the surname of the wife instead of the husband. The result is a culture where female descendants are most crucial to the continuing bloodline and the youngest daughter inherits all family property. Fascinated by this rare singularity, Klüppel spent 6 months with the Mawlynnong women to create Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls).

Along with the privilege of carrying the family name, girls are expected to take on many responsibilities at a very young age, often caring for 3 generations under one roof. As early as 8 years old, Mawlynnong females can run the entire household and tend to their younger siblings single handed. Despite their isolation from the modern world and a plethora of familial duties, the girls of Mawlynnong experience a life of freedom and reverence all their own.

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Monica Matteuzzi's curator insight, October 6, 2014 7:23 AM

For "the project "Mädchenland" Küppel spent six months in the village of Mawlynnong where people of the Khasi form the majority of the population. The Khasi are a matrilineal society. Here, traditionally it is girls who are of particularly importance and who play an exposed role in the family.

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Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Comment faire poser le sujet ? | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"La photo est une trace." De mon auguste bouche, l'affirmation pourrait passer pour un truisme barbant. Le rappel d'une telle évidence est pourtant un fondamental dans la photographie. Dans le sujet que je vous propose, cette trace est celle de la rencontre. Cette dernière exprime une relation entre le photographe et son sujet. Je vous suggère donc de bien réfléchir à la pose à faire prendre que vous indiquerez à vos sympathiques sujets. Un manque d'exigence à la prise de vue risquerait de produire un portrait manquant de force affective.

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Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Police corruption in india | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Police is one of the scariest examples of corruption. India does not have any special laws to prevent corruption. Like every other system it has loopholes which can be taken advantage of. Also, the public perception regarding corruption is rather limited.

Unless people respond strongly by rejecting corrupt people in elections, one should not expect much from the system. I am surprised to see that people in India do not look down upon those who become wealthy by adopting corrupt means.

We seem to be an over-forgiving nation. Being a federal country we have many rungs of political parties which increase the number of power points we have. Therefore, the number of public servants too is much higher than in a country with a unitary system.

Photo report's insight:

More information about police corruption in India: http://www.corruptioninindia.org/IndianPolice.php

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 13, 2014 5:09 AM

Police corruption in india

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India stray dogs | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

India stray dogs | Photographer:  Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

English:
"No country has as many stray dogs as India, and no country suffers as much from them. Free-roaming dogs number in the tens of millions and bite millions of people annually, including vast numbers of children. An estimated 20,000 people die every year from rabies infections — more than a third of the global rabies toll."

 - Serge BouvetFrançais: 
"Chaque année, 30.000 personnes meurent chaque année de la rage en Inde (70% des décès dans le monde) à cause de la morsure de chiens parias. Il est estimé qu’en Inde, une personne meurt de la rage à tous les 30 minutes. Environ 70% des victimes sont des enfants de moins de 15 ans."- Serge Bouvet

 

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:34 PM

So sad to see and hear how many stray dogs there are. I was very surprised when I read that India has more stray dogs than most. I would have thought differently, but even with the number of stray dogs I would definitely want to be cautious about knowing the boundaries in abusing/wanting to stop rabies from spreading. Although no one can really stop dogs from breeding and having more puppies, it would be important to maybe start a free vet clinic for the dogs that are in need. I mean by looking at the photo right there, its very sad to see what is going on. Although, I know that it is a struggle already for people in India to feed there families, imagine how the animals are trying to feed for there own. So sad. 

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COAL MINES | Photographer: Ken Hermann

COAL MINES | Photographer:  Ken Hermann | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Based in Copenhagen, Ken Hermann works for a diverse range of clients amongst those leading brands, agencies and media corporations.
Ken Hermann has a degree in advertising photography and his work has been published by a number of magazines and exhibited around the world. His City Surfer project made him the winner of Hasselblad Masters 2012.
An urge to explore photography has brought Ken around the world, from secluded regions of India and Ethiopia to the big city landscapes of New York where he has worked for renowned photographers like Brigitte Lacombe and Asger Carlsen.
The life in the cities as well as in the more abandon places is a big inspirational source to Ken Hermann and he loves to combine his commercial work with his other true passion- to explore life, people, and cultures.

Ken Hermann works in the fields of portrait, editorial – and commercial photography. In 2012 he became a member of Getty Images and win the Hasselblad Masters 2012.

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Chandraprabhu Temple | Travel photograher: Serge Bouvet

Chandraprabhu Temple | Travel photograher: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Impossible de contempler les merveilles du sanctuaire de Chandraprabhu tant il y a de monde; ce sont des touristes indiens pour la plupart ou des adeptes religieux. Néanmoins, je sympathise avec les moines Jaïns qui en apprenant que je suis photographe me commande un ensemble de photos. J’accepte. J’ai rendez-vous avec eux à 5h30 du matin. Le temple est vide. Il y fait très sombre. J’ai avec moi, 4 flashs Canon Speedlite 580EX II, un réflecteur, un trépied et 50 roupies de pourboire pour les prêtres.  Je commence à photographier toutes les fresques et  Stambha (colonne sculptée) fébrilement. Je dois faire vite car à 7h00, il y aura du monde. (...)

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Jisu Asrham| Photographer: Javier Arcenillas

Jisu Asrham| Photographer: Javier Arcenillas | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Only a hundred miles from Kolkata, but immersed in a jungle in which time seems to stand still, a Jesuit missionary group has expanded the meaning of being called “parents”.

In its mission “Jisu Ashram” hosts over a hundred children from families of agriculturists of lower castes. There are a thousand children and parents to represent the only hope for the future of a new generation of young Indians who are suffering, with concealed virulence, an abrupt transition to the modern era, the era of big cities, which work in the field and differ little from slavery.

Photo report's insight:

Humanist. Freelance photographer, member of Gea Photowords.

He develops humanitarian essays where the main characters are integrated in societies that border and set upon any reason or human right in a world that becomes increasingly more and more indifferent.

He is a psychologist at the Complutense University of Madrid. He has won several international prizes, including The Arts Press Award, Kodak Young Photographer, European Social Fund Grant, Euro Press of Fujifilm, Make History, UNICEF, SONY WPY, Fotoevidence POYI.

Currently he is carrying out new ideas in parallel with traditional journalism to spread his projects, and he is making up Audiovisual Projects with diplomatic work.

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