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LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014

LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
LIVING UNNOTICED13 February 2013

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has no law that makes homosexuality illegal in the country, but there is no societal acceptance for it, which makes the idea of equal treatment under the law a fantasy. Gay people there often choose to remain hidden to protect themselves from physical danger and social stigmatization. At this point, there is almost no legal support for the gay community outside the occasional gesture from international sources and NGOs.

 

Rainbow Sunrise was founded in 2011 by Joseph Saidi, 26, to support the gay community in the city of Bukavu in the eastern DRC. Progress is slow due to a lack of funds, but the organization plays a critical role for local gay men and women, providing free HIV testing, condoms, sexual education, and perhaps most importantly, a safe place to share their personal struggles with others, without having to feel ashamed, rejected, or judged.

 

Saidi was attacked and jailed for several days in May 2013: “When I was in prison, I spent two days without food or drink. I was tortured, and I was raped by three inmates. I suffered from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. I was discriminated against based on my sexual orientation. I was beaten by inmates. I thought I was going to die because since my birth I've never been subjected to such treatment.”

 

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TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
SHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 320F-STOP: 2.0FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mm  
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Child Witches | Photographer: Ilvy Njiokiktjien

Child Witches | Photographer: Ilvy Njiokiktjien | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The number of churches in the Democratic Republic of Congo is growing on a daily basis. Most of them are revival churches, led by Congolese men who acclaim being priests and prophets. In return for money, they perform exorcisms on 'bewitched' children, to heal them from evil spirits. - he number of churches in the Democratic Republic of Congo is growing on a daily basis. Most of them are revival churches, led by Congolese men who acclaim being priests and prophets. In return for money, they perform exorcisms on 'bewitched' children, to heal them from evil spirits."- Ilvy Njiokiktjien

 

Ilvy Njiokiktjien is an independent photographer and multimedia journalist based in the Netherlands. She has worked in many parts of the world, with a focus on Africa.

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SAPE | Photography Francesco Giusti

SAPE | Photography Francesco Giusti | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Francesco Giusti says, ‘In Congo-Brazzaville SAPE is an old passion that has never stopped, not even during war years. At the arrival of the French in Congo at the beginning of 9oo, the myth of elegance was born among young people working for the settlers. In 1922, Andre Grenard Matsoua, well-known for his resistance to the settlers, was the first Congolese to come back from Paris well dressed like a true French “Monsieur”, and greatly admired by all his fellow citizens. Today’s members of the SAPE consider themselves as artists and are respected and admired by the whole community.

 

The members of the SAPE take a touch of glamor into their humble environment with their refined style and faultless clothes. Everyone has his own repertory of gestures, marking him from all the others. Elegance is not the only important character. In fact, a true member of the SAPE is a gentleman and a pacifist. Every weekend the members of the SAPE, with their eccentric and amusing nicknames, gather in bars and fashionable dancing halls and parade in the streets among amused children and the applause of passers-by. These extemporized and spontaneous parades are the expression of a urban culture looking for new reference parameters and codes such as non-violence and elegance. They reflect the wish of young people in particular not to be left apart by society’.

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Congo (Belge) | Photographer: Carl de Keyzer

Congo (Belge) | Photographer: Carl de Keyzer | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As a member of Magnum for almost 20 years, Belgian photographer Carl de Keyzer has published several books, shooting projects across the globe in Europe, Russia, Asia, and the U.S. His strength lies in his ability to consistently capture pointed, expressive moments within daily life. For the photographs in Congo, he took five trips over two years to document the life of a post-colonial nation. “I decided to use a 1954 tourist guide for the Congo – at that time still a Belgian colony. Visiting all kinds of colonial backgrounds – mines, factories, schools, monasteries, churches, prisons. In fact it’s more a project about Belgium itself. A small European country (80 times smaller) being arrogant enough to export their own surrealism to the heart of Africa.”

 

The photographs were made into a series of two books in 2009 and 2010,Congo (Belge) and Congo Belge en images. The first book consisted of his contemporary photographs (tour guide) and the second included a selection of remastered glass negatives of the birth of the colony (1890 – 1920). Each photograph implies a story or carries a message—all focus on the people in the situation, all cross the line between straightforward photojournalism and a richer, more artful documentary style. “I tend to engage in long-term projects. I prefer to stay in a country for a longish period in order to get a better feeling of what is going on there. I prefer complex images because they reflect the complexity of life itself. There is a conflict between the utilitarian aspect of certain images taken for a precise purpose and photographs expressing a more personal viewpoint. I am always somewhere in the middle. Can you really grasp a situation through a picture? Yes, perhaps. You try, even if you stay a stranger looking in from the outside. What you are aiming at is photographs showing situations that have repercussions on people’s lives. That is why I am a photographer.”

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Link info:
The portfolio is on Projects : 2009 Congo (Belge)

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Congoloses wrestlers | Photographer: Colin Delfosse

Congoloses wrestlers | Photographer: Colin Delfosse | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Kinshasa, 2010. Eight million inhabitants, thousands of shegués (street children), hundreds of wrestlers and their brass bands. Edingwe, Dragon, City Train, Mbokotomo : the “legends” of Congolese wrestling invent themselves on a daily basis in the outskirts of Kinshasa. Body-building, and even black magic enthusiasts fight for glory in makeshift rings. They come from the streets and their charisma commands respect and admiration. But the heros of the ring are modest in victory : « Kobeta libanga papa mundele » [we manage, white man]. In the last hours of the day, when they have hung up their everyday “occupations”, they put on masks and wrestling kit ready to fight. The motorised parade of wrestlers attracts crowds from the dusty streets of Massina, Ngili and Matete, towns round the Congolese capital. In back yards, on the tables of the street cafés, or even in the street, the spell casters warm up over primus stoves and cannabis. The ring is hastily set up, the judge climbs onto the ropes. “Let the match begin!” The fight starts and is usually more or less fixed. Rounds follow one another until the final spell is cast, until the adversary is floored, until the next fight.

 

Graduated in journalism, Colin Delfosse turned to documentary photography in 2005, and became one of the founding members of the Out of Focus collective.

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