PHOTOGRAPHERS
68.1K views | +3 today
Follow
PHOTOGRAPHERS
News about photography
Curated by Photo report
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Barrio Triste | Photojournalist: Juan Arredondo

Barrio Triste | Photojournalist: Juan Arredondo | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For the past three years I have documented life in Medellín, the second largest city in Colombia and where I grew up, to understand how it has transformed from the world most dangerous city to one that is praised as one of Latin America’s safest and fastest growing cities. However, what I have found, is a city that is regressing to its violent past.

 

At the center of the city of Medellin rests one of the most dangerous neighborhoods known to locals as Barrio Triste (Sad Neighborhood). I began this project after meeting Fatima Mazo, a displaced mother of 4 children. Her husband was slain by paramilitaries for refusing to enlist with them. Faced with the same demand, she was forced to leave her farm in Concordia and found refuge in this small community at the center of Medellín.  This personal project is an effort to document the hope, despair and struggles of residents like Fatima of this neighborhood as well as way for me to understand the current reshaping of this city I once call home.

Over the last decade, efforts by the local government to change the image of the city of Medellín have spurred a wave of urban revitalization and the interest of foreign investment. Increasing violence due to drug trade has been spreading to marginalize neighborhoods. Neighborhoods such as Barrio Triste are battlegrounds for drug distribution by emerging criminals groups formed by demobilized paramilitaries groups and urban guerrillas partially fuel this violence. But corruption among officials and police officers, unemployment and constant migration of displaced civilians to the city are factors also attributed to this problem.

 

Barrio Triste was once a residential neighborhood, but over decades has been ousted by repair shops, warehouses and bars. Greased stained streets and dilapidated buildings become alive by the commotion of mechanics and street vendors during the day. Displaced families, homeless, sex-workers and drug addicts fine refuge on the empty sidewalks at night. A Symbiosis among the night and day residents sustain the survival of this neighborhood. Amidst this chaos, law and order is strictly and silently enforced by ‘Los Convivir’ a paramilitary group that controls the sale drugs and runs a protection racket for shop owners.

There are two versions as of how this small neighborhood came to be known as Barrio Triste. In the 1920’s a French man with the name of Tristan owned most of the houses and shops of the area. Locals found it difficult to pronounced the name Tristan but sounded more like Triste, Spanish for sad. The other version tells of wealthy landowners that upon gazing from their rooftops at the shacks along the river would say: “Look at those poor people, they must be sad to live like there”. Eventually, the two stories have come to be local folklore and Barrio Triste, officially named The Sacred Heart of Jesus, it is known to local residents as of the cities main drug dispense center.

 

I remain optimistic that things have change for the better; Barrio Triste serves a window to the violent past that once plagued the city of Medellín. It reminds me of a past I left behind and the hardship the citizens of this city and this country have endured over many years. - Juan Arredondo

Photo report's insight:

Juan Arredondo was born in New Jersey, USA, and grew up in Colombia.

He relocated to the United States to pursue undergraduate and graduate studies in organic chemistry. While working as a research scientist at a major pharmaceutical company he became interested in photography. In the fall of 2008 through 2009, Juan interned for photographers Eugene Richards and Lori Grinker, and held a teacher assistant position at ICP (International Center of Photography) in New York City. That same year Juan began to travel to Colombia to photograph that country’s protracted conflict with rebel groups.

Juan’s work has been recognized by PDN Photo Annual, PX3 Prix de la Photographie, The Yarka Vendriska Scholarship, and the Magenta Foundation as a Flash Forward Emerging Photographers winner. He has been selected for the Eddie Adams Workshop and nominated for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclas

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Back home – Photographer: Gianmarco Panucci

Back home – Photographer: Gianmarco Panucci | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Between 1999 and 2001 in Montes de Maria area, wich includes the regions of Sucre and Bolivar, armed groups of people commited 72 massacres, considered to be the most serious in the history of this Country.
The one occured in Chengue was definitely one of the most violent.
On the 17th of January 2001 in this village of 1300 people, 27 died and all the others were forced to leave.
Ten years later only 60 out of 1300 people who lived there before, came back to start over again.
Life condition though is difficult: people who used to live quietly before the rise of paramilitarism, are now struggling in the less inhabited places of Montes de Maria zone and one of the poorest village of Colombia. - Gianmarco Panucci

more...
No comment yet.