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Angels in hell | Photographer: Gmb Akash

Angels in hell | Photographer: Gmb Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Child labour is not a new issue in Bangladesh. as children remain here one of the most vulnerable groups living under threats of hunger, illiteracy, displacement, exploitation, trafficking, physical and mental abuse. Although the issue of child labor has always been discussed, there is hardly any remarkable progress even in terms of mitigation. 17.5 percent of total children of the 5-15 age groups are engaged in economic activities. Many of these children are engage in various hazardous occupations in manufacturing factories. Factory owners prefer to employ children as they could pay them less and also able to keep their factories free from trade unionism. a child labour gets taka 400 to 700 ( 1 USD = 70 taka) per month, while an adult worker earns up to taka 5000 per month.- Gmb Akash

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Life for Rent | Photojournalist: Gmb Akash

Life for Rent | Photojournalist: Gmb Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Night is the meaning of life here. Don’t dare to feel I am talking about moonlit night. It’s about a place where fluorescent bulbs hesitate to light up the great darkness.  You have to go step by s...
Photo report's insight:

'Fighting over getting men at night does not change relationship between themselves on the day. An unknown bonding for each other has tied them up and takes care of them in dear need. That’s why, when a girl out of frustration cut her full hand with blade just to torture herself, her roommate wipe it off and put medicine on it. A six feet by six feet room is world for 3-4 girls, so when customer leave they decorate the bed with flowery bed sheet or place artificial flower for adding beauty of it. Knowing a home never will come in their life still they care for their small room as like their house' - GMB Akash 

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Portraits | Photojournalist: Amy Helene Johansson

Portraits | Photojournalist: Amy Helene Johansson | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Unsafe Journey. A woman is riding between the railway carriages of a local train heading north from Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. Her luggage is tucked under the carriage in front of her. It is the month of Ramadan, a fast which culminates in Eid-ul-Fitr, a three-day celebration. Tens of thousands of people leave the city to go to their home village and celebrate with their families. Trains are packed and many who fail to get tickets before they sell out or can't afford buying them at the black market ride on the roof of the train or, like this woman, finds a quiet spot between the carriages." 

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Life for Rent | Photojournalist: GMB Akash

Life for Rent | Photojournalist: GMB Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The two-to-three –thousand –square-meter area of Kandaportte Potitalow (Bangladesh) is home to 1500 prostitutes and their families. This place is all they know and it has its own micro infrastructure of grocery stores, teahouses,hairdressers, and doctors. The women themselves only know this other world through the men who come here; they know rickshaw pullers, truckers, businessmen, policemen and priests.

 

Most of the girls who work here were either born here, fled here, or were sold by their relatives when they were between eight and ten years old.

 

Inside, the man is the guest, but he pays for the hospitality. Sex without undressing and without further intimacy costs hundred takes (1USD = 70 Takas). For special services the price can go up to as high as three hundred takes, and the whole night will cost you five hundred.

 

Low social status and a lack of opportunities for both education and employment, have forced many Bangladeshi women into prostitution or exposed them to other forms of sexual exploitation. An estimated 150,000 women are involved in prostitution in Bangladesh."

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The life and struggle of Garment workers | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter

The life and struggle of Garment workers | Photojournalist: Taslima Akhter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
“I wanted to be an artist by drawing and making handicraft but my dream is now ruined under the niddle of machine, under the rubble and sometimes by fire”- Lija a garment worker With a dream of living a better life million of workers from villages gather in workers barrack in cities. Lija, Modhumala, Shomapti, Masud, Brojesshwar are among them. Among more than 4 million workers 80% are women.  Surrounding the garment industries large workers barracks have grown in Bangladesh.  Workers toil from dawn to dusk for a minimum wage of BDT3000 taka a month (less than 37 $) till 2013.  Government declared a new gross minimum wage BDT 5300 ( near about $66) , which is not sufficient for them to survive. This 4 million workers are not more demanding. They don’t have any dream to have car-house, even any luxury item in life. They want only coarse rice-cloth and a little roof over the head to stay anyway. They want to send their children to school. They don’t want to send their children i
Photo report's insight:

 Taslima Akhter turned to documentary photography after many years as an activist with workers’ and women's rights organizations with whom she continues to work. She considers her documentary photography as a continuation of her activism. As a photographer, she likes to work on issues relating to gender, the environment and culture, as well as exploring spaces of social discrimination. Taslima's photo "Final Embrace" was selected as one of TIME Magazine’s top 10 photos of 2013.

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Bangladesh, ship business | Photojournalist | Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Bangladesh, ship business | Photojournalist | Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Ship breaking yards are the last resting place for end of life ships. At these yards, ships are scrapped, primarily for their steel content.
Until 1980s, ship breaking took place in the developed countries such as the United States, UK, and Europe. Today, however, most ship breaking yards are in developing nations, principally Bangladesh, China, and India, due to lower labor costs and less stringent environmental regulations dealing with the disposal of lead paint and other toxic substances.


Every year 600-700 sea vessels are brought to the beaches of Asia for scrapping and 52% of large ships are scrapped in Bangladesh.
Workers have no unions, no safety equipment, and no training. About 50 are said to die in accidents each year; often in explosions set off by blowtorches deep inside the fume-filled holds.

Photo report's insight:

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.

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Cyclone Aila hits Bangladesh || Photographer: GMB Akash

Cyclone Aila hits Bangladesh || Photographer: GMB Akash | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"At least 275 people have been killed and millions have been displaced by cyclone Aila, which hit parts of coastal Bangladesh and eastern India on May 25th. Shyamnagar Upazila, an area of Bangladesh's Satkhira district that has seen some of the worst damage.

 

The cyclone triggered tidal surges and severe flooding. Several thousand homes in the area were washed away while agricultural land was swamped. More than 500 shrimp farms were flooded by five to seven feet high tidal surges in the affected area. Aid agencies are warning that a lack of food and clean drinking water could lead to many more deaths."

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