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Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald

Magic City | Photographer: Marie Hald | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
MIAMI har gennem årtier været et yndet tilflugtssted for vidt forskellige befolkningsgrupper. ”A melting pot of cultures” kalder de lokale byen. Kendt for at huse ældre amerikanere, de såkaldte ”snowbirds”, som flytter hertil i alderdom- men for at få opfyldt pensionistdrømmen. Og for hvert år at indvaderes af tusindvis af unge collegestuderende, som tager hertil for at feste vildt og holde Spring Break. Miami er på mange måder en slags Latinamerikas hovedstad. Ja mange mener ikke egentlig ikke, at byen er en rigtig del af USA. 70 procent af byens befolkning er hispanics og taler spansk, mens de hvide udgør en minoritet. Med solskin og varme året rundt er denne smeltedigel en speciel og tiltrækkende magnet for mange grupper: immigran- ter, der søger politisk asyl, folk, der vil opleve den amerikanske drøm, og rige, der vil nyde livet i dette dragende paradis. En ting er fælles for alle de forskellige grupper, der søger her til: De søger det gode liv.
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Portraitlandia | Photographer: Kirk Crippens

Portraitlandia | Photographer: Kirk Crippens | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

When Kirk Crippens went on a five-week residency at Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, Ore., he welcomed the opportunity to shift gears a bit. The residency allowed him to work without distraction from life’s daily grind, and he was able to take a break from his long-term project about the recession toward something more whimsical. The result was a portrait-based series, “Portraitlandia,” in which he turned his camera on the people of Portland.

 

Although he was only in Portland for about a month, Crippens spent close to a year preparing for the residency, acting a bit like a tourist and scouting out possible portrait subjects through word of mouth. He decided to follow his subjects’ lead regarding locations for the shoot, and he asked them also to give him two hours of their time to create the portrait—an unusually long commitment for Crippens. “I wanted to do something that had authenticity while being aware I was new to Portland and didn’t have the time to build the relationships I would normally have,” he said.

 

Crippens also decided to work outside of his comfort zone and shot the entire series with a 4-by-5 view camera using film. It was the first time for him using the camera, and he practiced using it before heading to Portland. He said it allowed him to slow down his process, and it broke the ice a bit with his subjects who were curious about the camera. “Working in a slow, analog medium really leant itself to having an opportunity to get to know the folks,” he said. “It gave an expansiveness to their sessions.”

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Healthcare in Mississipi: Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario

Healthcare in Mississipi: Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Nowhere is the American health care system more broken and desperate than rural Mississippi. Which is why an approach born in a broken and desperate place — Iran — may offer the best chance of saving lives. Photographer Lynsey Addario visited the impoverished state of Mississippi to explore this new approach to health care and hear some of the stories of those suffering from health problems." - Lynsey Addario

Photo report's insight:

Photographer Lynsey Addario visited the impoverished state of Mississippi to explore this new approach to health care and hear some of the stories of those suffering from health problems.

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Passenger Side Window | Photographer: Johnny Tergo

Passenger Side Window | Photographer: Johnny Tergo | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Out of all the clever photo hacks we’ve seen, this one may be the most creative. Johnny Tergo, a Los Angeles photographer, has built an over-the-top camera and lighting setup in his Chevy Silverado that he uses to take studio-quality portraits of pedestrians.

The photos document moments that can’t be shot any other way. Try lugging studio lights down the street and capturing the same scenes. Tergo, 35, says he commutes a lot as a freelancer he wanted to exploit his time behind the wheel.

 

“What I’ve tried to do is bring the studio lighting aspect to everyday real life on the streets,” he says.

Inside the truck on the passenger side, Tergo bolted a platform that holds a Canon 1D Mark IV with a 16-35 mm lens, a computer, an iPad mini and a studio light. Outside near the tailgate he’s attached a second studio light and reflector to a boom that extends 10 feet above the ground. Two gas generators in the bed of the truck pump out 4,000 watts for the lights, including a third that’s rigged under the bumper (photos of his setup are included at the end of the gallery).

As Tergo drives in neighborhoods with high foot traffic, he sets his exposure using an app called Capture Pilot on the iPad mini. He also adjusts the strobes for the ambient light using the strobe controls positioned in the cab. When he spots a subject, he drives around the block while he frames up the shot.

He’s learned a few tricks to get the best results. He leads moving subjects by pulling forward slightly, waiting for them to enter the frame. He’s also not above honking the horn and pretending to be angry with another driver to get people to look toward the camera.

 

The whole apparatus is triggered with a PocketWizard. Images are sent to Tergo’s dash-mounted iPhone via on-board wifi so he can review them. If he likes the photo he moves on. If not he tries to get another frame off before the subject figures out what’s going on. He says on a normal day he takes between 40 and 50 pictures with about five that are actually usable.

Some people are not so stoked to get their photo taken without consent. Tergo says there’s been a lot of yelling.

“A lot of people think I’m up to something nefarious,” he says. “But there have also been a couple times where someone has been really cool and I’ve pulled over and explained what I was doing.”

Tergo wants to add a second truck and more lights to the mix. Ideally, he’d have the extra truck pull up somewhere off to the side or behind the subject so it could uses it’s flashes as a rim light, which would help define the body of the person in the frame.

“I enjoy the rigging as much as the image making and anything that I find that will take it to the next level, I add it,” he says. “I don’t want to stop with good enough, I want it to be awesome.”

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The Nu Project: Women of North America I | Photographer: Matt Blum

The Nu Project: Women of North America I | Photographer: Matt Blum | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Matt Blum started “The Nu Project” with the idea that women of all shapes and sizes deserve to be photographed beautifully as fine art nudes. His subjects were volunteers through word-of-mouth or Craigslist–they came with their stories, their successes and failures, their scars, their survival of abusive relationships, their tales of triumph over body image–and he photographed them. These days the collection continues to grow; over 150 women (some with their partners) have participated, most in their own homes.

Photo report's insight:

"Thank you for being here. The Nu Project is a series of honest nudes of women from all over the world. The project began in 2005 and has stayed true to the original vision: no professional models, minimal makeup and no glamour. The focus of the project has been and continues to be the subjects and their personalities, spaces, insecurities and quirks.

 

To date, over 150 women across North and South America have participated in the project.  Without their courage, confidence and trust, none of this would have been possible. We are so thankful for their willingness to open their homes to us.

 

If you’d like to get involved as a contributor to our fine art book, you can find the information to the right.  If you’d like to sign up for a shoot, please visit the participation page for more information."- Matt Blum

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100 photos of Steve McCurry for freedom of information | Reporters sans frontières

100 photos of Steve McCurry for freedom of information | Reporters sans frontières | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Reporters sans frontières is proud to open the pages of his Steve McCurry's new album and presenting 100 of his finest photographs taken in Afghanistan over the last thirty years.

 

REPORTERS WITHOUT BORDERS, FOR FREEDOM OF INFORMATION

Freedom of expression and of information will always be the world’s most important freedom. If journalists were not free to report the facts, denounce abuses and alert the public, how would we resist the problem of children-soldiers, defend women’s rights, or preserve our environment? In some countries, torturers stop their atrocious deeds as soon as they are mentioned in the media. In others, corrupt politicians abandon their illegal habits when investigative journalists publish compromising details about their activities. Still elsewhere, massacres are prevented when the international media focuses its attention and cameras on events.

Freedom of information is the foundation of any democracy. Yet almost half of the world’s population is still denied it.

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Elementarz | Photographer: KAROLINA KARLIC

Elementarz | Photographer: KAROLINA KARLIC | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Karolina Karlic is a Los Angeles-based conceptual artist. Her work is tied to the idea of the West: road trips, car culture, industry, economic ups and downs, and the experience of the migrant. Her series “Elementarz” (Polish for “Primer”) shuttles between the familiar American photographic road trip and her reexamination of parts of Poland where her family comes from and to which her father, after years working as an emigre engineer in the Detroit auto industry, was dispatched to investigate new sites for the next generation car plants. The work weaves together family, surrogate relatives, religion, nostalgia, Motown music, manufactured ideologies and other themes.

Karlic is a recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship.  She continues to explore representations of American culture, industry, labor, and the immigrant experience in a current work-in-progress that focuses on an American oil boom town. – Artist statement courtesy of Karolina Karlic

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Cross Country | Photographer: Roger Kisby

Cross Country | Photographer: Roger Kisby | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

With no money coming in and gas prices at an all-time high, I took off on a cross-country road trip. I didn’t have a set plan of where to go or what to shoot; I just knew that I wanted to travel and take photos before I returned to New York to start a new chapter in my career.

It was a fantastic experience. I tried to shoot a portrait every day, and I ultimately shot about 70 portraits of people I met along the way. These images are of whoever I came across: a biker at a rest stop in California, a priest at a church in New Mexico, prisoners on work release in Texas, squatters at Slab City, a stripper in Portland, a fly fisherman in Montana and many more.—Roger Kisby

Roger Kisby is a New York-based portrait and editorial photographer who recently quit his job in advertising to pursue a career in photography.

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Cinematic Street Portraits | Photographer: Michael Goldberg

Cinematic Street Portraits | Photographer: Michael Goldberg | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The images are unposed, but the strobe light creates a sense of heightened drama associated with the fictional world of cinema and advertising.

 

Los Angeles-based Michael Goldberg photographed these candid portraits on the streets of Madrid, New York, Sydney, Bangkok and Barcelona over two years. In this work he aims to ‘blur the line between fact and fiction, and play the tradition of candid street photography off the more artificial look of theatrically-staged photography’.


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Desert | Photographer :Lucy Levene

Desert | Photographer :Lucy Levene | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lucy Levene's is a London based artist & Photographer. Her work has been published and exhibited internationally, with shows in London, New York and Europe.

 

Coming from an ongoing interest in Realism, this work explores construction; both as in constructed photography and within constructed or ‘fake’ spaces. The images are taken in and around Los Angeles, an area/landscape continually re-fictionalised through film.

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NYPD: Operation Impact | Photographer: Antonio Bolfo

NYPD: Operation Impact | Photographer: Antonio Bolfo | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Antonio Bolfo worked as a police officer in the NYPD from 2006 to 2008 where he patrolled some of the most dangerous housing projects in the Bronx. Bolfo says, “There was a substantial amount of depression in the unit and at the precinct in general, but no one would ever admit it out of fear it would be taken as a sign of weakness. People deal with depression in a number of ways, some take to alcohol, others to infidelity. For me it was photography that helped ease the burden.” Bolfo’s series, IMPACT: Life On The Housing Beat opens tomorrow, July 24, at the Half King gallery in NY. The photographer Antonio Bolfo will participate in an opening night discussion with Ed Conlon, former NYPD detective and author of Blue Blood.

 

Operation IMPACT is an NYPD program that assigns young, untested officers to the most violent and dangerous neighborhoods of New York City for a full-scale plunge into “The Job.” Part field training, part trial by fire, IMPACT pits these officers against some of the most vicious criminals in the country on a daily basis. This photography project follows one IMPACT unit consisting of thirty rookies assigned to housing projects in the South Bronx, one of the poorest and toughest neighborhoods in America.

 

Many criminologists directly attribute Operation IMPACT to New York City’s 21st century revival. But the focus on arrests comes at a price: sacrificing community policing, which leads to a tense relationship between the neighborhood’s beleaguered residents and the overstrained cops.

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The Black Label Bike Club | Photographer: Lauren Silberman

The Black Label Bike Club | Photographer: Lauren Silberman | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Lauren Silberman lives and works in New York City.  She received her MFA from the International Center of Photography-Bard Program in Advanced Photographic Studies and her BA in Art History from Barnard College.

 

She is currently a faculty member at the International Center of Photography.  Lauren recently completed a residency with Camera Club of New York in 2012 and was an artist-in-residence in the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace program during the 2008-2009 year and was a Visiting Scholar at NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

 

She has performed at Location One, Deitch Projects and 3rd Ward, as well as the several underground events and venues that have provided inspiration for her work. In 2007 she was featured in PDN’s photo annual as emerging talent.  She has exhibited in New York and abroad.

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American Ocean | Photographer: Aaron Huey

American Ocean | Photographer: Aaron Huey | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Aaron Huey, 1975, USA, has done a vast amount of projects. In 2002 he walked 3,349 miles across the United States. He regularly shoots for the National Geographic magazine, The New Yorker and Harper's amongst many others. He was named one of PDN's top 30 emerging photographers in 2007. In 2008 he was awarded a National Geographic Expedition Council grant to hitchhike across Siberia. Aaron has covered stories on Afghanistan, Pakistan, Georgia and the United States to name a few. He was planning on doing a story on poverty in America and ended up at the Pine Ridge Indian reservation. Pine Ridgebecame a long-term project on it's own. The following images come from the series American Ocean.

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World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST

World Press Photo of the Year 2013 | 2014 PHOTO CONTEST | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
2014 PHOTO CONTEST

The World Press Photo of the Year 2013 is a picture by American photographer John Stanmeyer.

Judging
An international jury of leading professionals in the field of photojournalism worldwide began judging the entries at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam on 1 February.

Results
The results of the 2014 World Press Photo Contest were announced on 14 February. The prize-winning pictures will be presented in a year-long exhibition that travels through more than 100 cities in over 45 countries, to start in Amsterdam in De Nieuwe Kerk on 18 April 2014.

Prizes
The jury awarded first, second and third prizes in nine categories. First-prize winners receive a cash prize of €1,500. The premier award carries a cash prize of €10,000. In addition, Canon will donate a professional DSLR camera and lens kit to the author of the World Press Photo of the Year 2013. The annual Awards Days, a two-day celebration of the prizewinners, takes place in Amsterdam on 24 and 25 April 2014.

Photo report's insight:
View the entire collection of winning images from the 57th World Press Photo Contest. The winners were selected from more than 90,000 images submitted to the contest. 
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Voyeurs | Photographer: Dave Bush Photography

Voyeurs | Photographer:  Dave Bush Photography | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

We are all voyeurs this day in age. It is close to impossible not to watch people at the table next to us, check out the strangers sitting across from us on a train, or find a celebrity’s Instagram and scroll away. Hitchcock preceded, in a way, today’s compulsion for viewing others through a filter of some kind, via his film Rear Window. We can all still identify with James Stewart’s wounded photographer staring through a telephoto lens into the apartments across the way, and as movie-goers staring at the screen, we were implicit in the director’s game before we even had a chance to recognize its designs.

 

New York-based photographer Dave Bush’s photos of people in cars taps into this distant gaze, one that brings us “closer” to the subject but puts us slightly on edge. We know these are strangers and yet we cannot look away from their faces, for their expressions speak to a particularly familiar kind: those that we make when we think no one is watching. These images speak to one of our most basic impulses: watching people. 

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FOTOGRAFISKTIDENDE's curator insight, October 9, 2013 7:34 AM

Voyeur lyder ikke så pænt. Men vi kigger da. Vi skal sgu da kigge !

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The evasion studie | Fine art photographer: Stevens Brahms

The evasion studie | Fine art photographer: Stevens Brahms | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

These images were taken by American photographer Steven Brahms, for his project titled “The Evasion Studies”. Simply put they are dramatic run-for-your-life style portraits in rather unfavourable everyday places. A very simple idea and beautifully executed. In recent news Steven was one of the 2012 recipients of the Aaron Siskind Foundation — Individual Photographer’s Fellowship. Check out his work, it’s all gold.

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Masculinities | Photographer: Chad States

Masculinities | Photographer: Chad States | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“Growing up as a gay man in the U.S. I have always been aware of how men were supposed to act and I judged myself against these ideas. Masculinity was always something that was attractive to me but when I tried to unpack what made someone masculine I found it hard to define. Masculinity seemed based on relativity and shifted in different circumstances and cultures. I wanted to investigate how others defined their own masculinity to try to create touchstone for the term.”

 

“I found most of my subjects through Craigslist, posting in multiple areas to try to cast as wide a net as possible. I would simply ask the question, “Are you masculine?” in the heading of the post. I would then invite myself over to the respondents home to photograph them. We would meet for the first time as strangers which required a lot of trust on both their part and mine. The people who were then willing to go through with the project were a small fraction of those who actually responded.

 

“The structure of the project created a special circumstance in which those who were still willing to participate had a strong need to have their own masculinity confirmed by the photograph. I would collaborate with the subjects on making the photograph. They would decide what to wear as well as how they wanted to construct themselves for the camera. I used a 4×5 camera only taking about 8-10 shots per sitting, so the poses and choices are very intentional on part of the sitter. The quotations are pulled from email exchanges before the shoot in which I ask them to tell me why they think they are masculine.”-

Photo report's insight:

Philadelphia-based photographer Chad States explores how one defines masculinity for themselves in a series of portraits created over two years. The answers are intriguing, the images equally so. We recently asked him a few questions about the project, entitled Masculinities.


 


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DELVAC TRUCKERS | Photographer: Brian Finke

DELVAC TRUCKERS | Photographer: Brian Finke | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Like housemaids, tinkers and gynaecologists, truckers tend to exist at the periphery of our consciousness, shadowy figures up to something beefy in the provinces. Truth be told, untilBrian Finke informed me about truckers, I didn't know what one was."  - Brian Finke

Photo report's insight:

"However, since sitting with Mr Finke, looking at his lovely pictures and hearing his tales of truckerly derring-do in overlit cafeterias and unsavoury lavatories the length and breadth of the Colonies, I confess to having become curiously fascinated; in a fluttering, D.H. Lawrence kind of way. They are just so manly. A latter-day hybrid of pirate, highwayman, gypsy and village idiot. They have grizzled jowls, stained undershirts stretched across vast plains of surplus tissue and bee-stung lips flecked with brown saliva. They make no concessions to any etiquette other than their own.

With unashamedly frightful table manners, they fork indeterminate matter into their graveyard-toothed mouths like the orangutans of Borneo, before going on to expel titanic bouts of flatulence into their little mobile carriages while listening to middle-aged men in cowboy hats singing songs about how proud they are to be dreadful. Their speech is coarse and guttural - bronze-age hominids chuntering giddily over bones and whittled sticks and little dollops of animal excretia."

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Just Write | Photojpournalist: Steve McCurry

Just Write | Photojpournalist: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Steve McCurry has covered many areas of international and civil conflict, including Beirut, Cambodia, the Philippines, the Gulf War, the former Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, and Tibet. He focuses on the human consequences of war, not only showing what war impresses on the landscape, but rather, on the human face.

 

McCurry's work has been featured in every major magazine in the world and frequently appears in National Geographic, with recent articles on Tibet, Afghanistan, Iraq, Yemen, and the temples of Angkor Wat, Cambodia.

 

A high point in McCurry's career was the rediscovery of the previously unidentified Afghan refugee girl that many have described as the most recognizable photograph in the world today.

McCurry has published books including The Imperial Way (1985), Monsoon(1988), Portraits (1999), South Southeast (2000), Sanctuary (2002), The Path to Buddha: A Tibetan Pilgrimage (2003), Steve McCurry (2005), and Looking East(2006).

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Fault Line - A portrait of East Austin...| Photographer: John H. Langmore

Fault Line - A portrait of East Austin...| Photographer: John H. Langmore | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

A Portrait of East Austin and the Universal Story of Gentrification

East Austin is not the blank canvas developers might see. It’s like a Picasso—complex, disturbing when viewed from certain angles, beautiful when viewed from others. The purpose of this series is to reveal— and more importantly, to celebrate—the beauty, the history, the charm, and the perseverance of the people of East Austin and all the neighborhoods like it that the vagaries of time will render unrecognizable to future generations. — John Langmore, March 2009

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In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | Photographer: Aaron Huey for National Geographic Magazine

In the Shadow of Wounded Knee | Photographer: Aaron Huey for National Geographic Magazine | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"On the Great Plains, hidden away on little traveled back roads, is American Prisoner of War Camp Number 334.  This is also known as Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, home of the Lakota Sioux.  They are the tribe that suffered the infamous Wounded Knee Massacre, in December of 1890, in which an estimated 350 Lakota were killed.  Among the dead were over one hundred unarmed women and children.  Since that day Wounded Knee, and the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, have been a symbol of the wrongs inflicted on Native Americans by the descendants of Europeans. Pine Ridge is the quintessential example of the failures of the reservation system, with staggering statistics on everything from violent crime to education.  

Sadly, Pine Ridge continues to be the setting for an ongoing massacre within the tribe.  Gangs on the reservation are out of control, and the violence they live by grips even the smallest villages.  Unemployment on the reservation fluctuates between 85-90%, the housing office is unable to afford to build new structures, and existing structures are falling apart.  Many are homeless, and those with homes are packed into rotting buildings with up to five families.  Thirty-nine percent of the homes on the Pine Ridge Reservation have no electricity.  It is reported that at least 60% of the homes on the Pine Ridge Reservation are infested with black mold, which causes an often-fatal condition with infants, children, and the elderly.  90% of the population lives below federal poverty levels."

 

Photos from National Geographic's article: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/08/pine-ridge/fuller-text

Aaron Huey is a freelance photographer based in Seattle, WA.

 

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The Canaries | Photographer: Thilde Jensen

The Canaries | Photographer: Thilde Jensen | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Canaries series is a personal account of life on the edge of modern civilization – as one of the human canaries, the first casualties of a ubiquitous synthetic chemical culture. Since World War II the production and use of synthetic petroleum derived chemicals has exploded. We live in a world today where man-made chemicals are part of every breath we take and where electro magnetic emissions are beaming at us from every corner.

 

As a result it is believed that more than ten million Americans have developed a disabling condition referred to as Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) or Environmental Illness (EI). MCS is a condition in which the immune and central nervous systems go into extreme reactions when exposed to small amounts of daily chemicals like perfume, cleaning products, car exhaust, printed matter, construction materials and pesticides.

 

When the delicate balance of life first has been broken there seems no end to how sensitive we can become or to which element one might sensitize. In addition to chemicals some react to food, electromagnetic fields, textiles and even light – making life a near impossibility.

 

Many people with MCS/EI end up living as refugees in remote areas out of tents, cars, or retro-fitted trailers, away from dangers of neighbors’ chemical use. Others are prisoners of their homes, with advanced air filter systems to keep outside air from contaminating their breathing space.

 

At the core of the bizarre, and sometimes freakish, appearance of Environmental Illness is a questioning of the sanity of a human world continuing to develop in a manner that is toxic to life itself." (Thilde Jensen )

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Caroline Brasch Nielsen & Madison Headrick | Fashion photographer: Greg Kadel For Numéro #134

Caroline Brasch Nielsen & Madison Headrick | Fashion photographer: Greg Kadel For Numéro #134 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Greg Kadel is an American fashion photographer and filmmaker based in New York City. Greg Kadel’s images have appeared in publications including American Vogue, Vogue Italia, Vogue Nippon, Vogue UK, L'Uomo Vogue, French Vogue, Vogue Germany, Vogue China, Numéro, Numéro Homme, Visionaire, i-D, The Face, Another Magazine, Harper's Bazaar, W Jewelry, British GQ, 10 Magazine, Allure, Inside View, V, Melody. His advertising clients include Aveda, Express, Valentino, Louis Vuitton, H&M, Max Mara, Loewe, Oscar de la Renta, Calvin Klein, Biotherm, Diane von Fürstenberg, Elie Tahari, Hermès, Lancôme, L'Oréal, Max Mara, Shiseido, Victoria's Secret, and Salvatore Ferragamo.

 

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Wild Roots | Photographer: Mike Belleme

Wild Roots | Photographer: Mike Belleme | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Mike Belleme is a freelance photographer living in Asheville North Carolina. His work strives to invite the viewer into the lives of unique people.

 

"In the mountains of North Carolina there is an expanse of donated land inhabited by a small group of people who, for their own reasons, choose not to live as members of modern society. Tod and Talia, a couple, have been living in this place called Wild Roots for over seven years. Among the many reasons for eschewing modern society is their belief that the fall of civilization is imminent. Tod and Talia find comfort living with nature and being directly connected with most of the food that they eat, clothes that they wear and their surroundings. They, along with a fluctuating number of other resident of Wild Roots, are constantly trying to move farther away from reliance on society and build a stronger and more intimate relationship with their natural surroundings."

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Portraits | Photogprapher: Dan Winters

Portraits | Photogprapher: Dan Winters | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Dan Winters is an American photojournalist, illustrator, filmmaker and writer.

Known for the broad range of subject matter he is able to interpret, he is widely recognized for his iconic celebrity portraiture, his scientific photography, his photojournalistic stories and more recently his drawings and illustrations. He has created portraits of luminaries such as Bono, Neil Young, Barack Obama, Tupac Shakur, the Dalai Lama, Stephen Hawking, Leo DiCaprio, Helen Mirren, Johnny Depp, Kate Winslet, Angelina Jolie, Sandra Bullock, Brad Pitt, Steven Spielberg and Al Gore.

 

He has won over one hundred national and international awards from American Photography, Communication Arts, The Society of Publication Designers, Photo District News, The Art Directors Club of New York and Life, among others. In 1998, he was awarded the prestigious Alfred Eisenstadt Award for Magazine Photography. In 2003, he won a 1st place World Press Photo Award in the portrait category. In 2003, he was also honored by Kodak as a photo "Icon" in their biographical "Legends" series.

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