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AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte

AFRICAN MIDDLE CLASS | Photographer: Ulrik Tofte | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

This is Habib Manzah Iddi’s first motorcycle. He is part of a growing new generation of youth that is aware of the surrounding world and strives towards their dreams. They are determined not to live like their parents did, but wish to assimilate to the modern world.

According to the UN site World’s Best News, every third African is now considered middle class, around 33% of the population having up to $20 dollars to spend a day. With the extreme poverty of the last few decades slowly dissipating, people in places like Ghana can afford more than just food for survival. Across the continent, Africans are spending more money on education, healthcare and entrepreneurial endeavors, creating a landscape of rapid cultural, economic and social change. Danish photographer Ulrik Tofte documents the young people in the middle of this transformative upheaval, their lives a constant balance of old traditions and new possibilities.

The Key Is Not To Blink presents a different vision of Africa than we are used to. Tofte focused on youth in Northern Ghana, determined to capture images contrasting the typical photos of war and starving children so familiar to us. The growing middle class has created a culture more focused on the individual – people now more free to have dreams, desires and personal goals. Torn between issues of religion, pop culture, familial expectations and consumerism, young Africans have an uncertain and limitless world in which to navigate their lives. Though progress can be slow, Ghana and other countries like it continue to move forward while trying to preserve some sense of their past.

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LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014

LIVING UNNOTICED | Photojournalist: JANA ASENBRENNEROVA - World Press 2014 | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
LIVING UNNOTICED13 February 2013

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has no law that makes homosexuality illegal in the country, but there is no societal acceptance for it, which makes the idea of equal treatment under the law a fantasy. Gay people there often choose to remain hidden to protect themselves from physical danger and social stigmatization. At this point, there is almost no legal support for the gay community outside the occasional gesture from international sources and NGOs.

 

Rainbow Sunrise was founded in 2011 by Joseph Saidi, 26, to support the gay community in the city of Bukavu in the eastern DRC. Progress is slow due to a lack of funds, but the organization plays a critical role for local gay men and women, providing free HIV testing, condoms, sexual education, and perhaps most importantly, a safe place to share their personal struggles with others, without having to feel ashamed, rejected, or judged.

 

Saidi was attacked and jailed for several days in May 2013: “When I was in prison, I spent two days without food or drink. I was tortured, and I was raped by three inmates. I suffered from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. I was discriminated against based on my sexual orientation. I was beaten by inmates. I thought I was going to die because since my birth I've never been subjected to such treatment.”

 

Photo report's insight:
TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
SHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 320F-STOP: 2.0FOCAL LENGTH: 35.0 mm  
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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:45 AM

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Witness to a Massacre in a Nairobi Mall | Photojournalist: Tyler Hicks

Witness to a Massacre in a Nairobi Mall | Photojournalist: Tyler Hicks | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Tyler Hicks, a Times photographer, was nearby when gunmen opened fire on an upscale Kenyan mall.
Photo report's insight:

" I was at a framing shop in an adjacent mall picking up some photographs that had been given to me as gifts by photojournalists who attended my wedding. I was very close. I didn’t have all of my equipment, just had a small camera that I always have with me in case something happens.

I ran over to the mall and I was able to photograph until my wife [Nichole Sobecki], who is also a photojournalist and was at our house, was able to collect my Kevlar helmet and professional cameras before she came to cover the news herself.

Tyler Hicks/The New York TimesPolice and soldiers swept through the mall to pursue the assailants and to help civilians escape to safety.

When I left the framing shop, I could see right away that there was something serious going on, because there were lots of people running away from the mall. I ran over there and within minutes I could see people who had been shot in the leg or stomach from what appeared to be small arms fire being helped by other civilians. This went on for about 30 minutes.

The mall is Nairobi’s most high-end shopping center, completely up to Western standards, with movie theaters, nice cafes, supermarkets and a casino. Pretty much anything you need. I’ve been there, so I knew the layout inside.

From the beginning I wanted to get with some security forces inside the mall.

Tyler Hicks/The New York TimesGlass was shattered inside the mall.

We managed to find an entrance where people who were hiding inside the mall were coming out. We ran into that service entrance and we hooked up with some police who let us stay with them as they did security sweeps clearing different stores — very much like what you see when the military enters a village. Shop to shop and aisle to aisle, looking for the shooters who were still inside." - Tyler Hicks

 
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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, September 24, 2013 9:55 AM

Photos from Nairobi Mall. Not easy to watch, but the photos are good.

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Hereros | Photographer: Jim Naughten

Hereros | Photographer: Jim Naughten | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“I traveled in Africa after finishing college. I bought an old motorbike and more or less stumbled across Namibia on my journey. It was instantly spellbinding—the extraordinary landscapes, the colorful and varied inhabitants and their surreal and often brutal history. I photographed the same tribe back then with my old film camera but always wanted to return to make a more extended project. I’m fascinated by history and often choose projects that make connections with the past.”

 

“Each image, a portrait of Herero tribe members of Namibia, 
reveals a material culture that harkens the region’s tumultuous 
past: residents wear Victorian era dresses and paramilitary 
costume as a direct result and documentation of its early 20th 
century German colonization.

Namibia’s borders encompass the world’s oldest desert. Bleak 
lunar landscapes, diamond mines, German ghost towns, rolling 
sea fogs, nomadic tribes and a hostile coastline littered with 
shipwrecks and whale skeletons comprise the region’s striking 
and haunting natural features. Namibia’s geography has 
witnessed a turbulent and little documented history of human 
settlement, upheaval and war within a particularly brutal 
period of European colonization. 

In the European scramble to colonise Africa, Kaiser Wilhelm’s 
Germany claimed one of the least populated and most hostile 
environments on the planet. It became Deutsche Sudewest- 
afrika. Though sparsely populated, it was already home to the 
San, Nama and Herero people. Rhenish missionaries set about 
converting and clothing them after European fashion. Over 
time, this became a Herero tradition, and continuing to dress 
in this manner was a great source of pride to the wearer. 
Gradually, regional variations in the silhouette emerged; for 
example, the addition of 'cow horns' to headdresses reflects 
the great importance with which they regard their cattle.“ - Jim Naughten

Photo report's insight:

Jim Naughten is an artist living and working in London. His new book, Conflict and Costume, will be published in Spring 2013 by Merrell.

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Angola | Photojournalist: Ami Vitale

Angola  | Photojournalist: Ami Vitale | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"From 1975 to 2002, war was a part of daily life for the people living in the rich African country of Angola. The beaten orange paths that zigzagged across the territory represented the displacement of more than twenty-percent of the population who had to leave their villages for government-controlled towns. Much of the population was unable to feed themselves while those that lived from the rich oil resources experienced a very different life. They were two worlds living uneasily side by side."- Ami Vitale

Photo report's insight:

ased in Montana, Vitale is a contract photographer with National Geographic magazine and is writing a book about the stories behind the images. She frequently gives workshops throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. Ami Vitale is judge of the show HTC Mission Covershot on National Geographic channel alon with Nagesh Kukunoor.

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Child Witches | Photographer: Ilvy Njiokiktjien

Child Witches | Photographer: Ilvy Njiokiktjien | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The number of churches in the Democratic Republic of Congo is growing on a daily basis. Most of them are revival churches, led by Congolese men who acclaim being priests and prophets. In return for money, they perform exorcisms on 'bewitched' children, to heal them from evil spirits. - he number of churches in the Democratic Republic of Congo is growing on a daily basis. Most of them are revival churches, led by Congolese men who acclaim being priests and prophets. In return for money, they perform exorcisms on 'bewitched' children, to heal them from evil spirits."- Ilvy Njiokiktjien

 

Ilvy Njiokiktjien is an independent photographer and multimedia journalist based in the Netherlands. She has worked in many parts of the world, with a focus on Africa.

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Waiting for Justice | Photographer: Fernando Moleres

Waiting for Justice | Photographer: Fernando Moleres | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Abdul Moresey arrive to Pademba prison in 2007 as a child. He was charged  with murder. The facts are that  Abdul  went to the river  with his best friend and this was drowned. The child´s family accused Abdul  of murder and he is  four  years pending trial. Sentencing in this country is abnormally harsh, and the Sierra Leone government has pronounced that criminal responsibility begins at age ten, which is in clear conflict with the Convention for Child Rights ratified by the same government  in 1990.

Photo report's insight:

"This work was mostly shot in Pademba Road Prison where 32 children, between the years of 14 and 17, share prison life with 1,300 adults." - Fernando Moleres

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Somaliland | Photojournalist: Marco Gualazzini

Somaliland | Photojournalist: Marco Gualazzini | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Somaliland. The State that never was celebrates its twentieth anniversary. The Ethiopian border is marked with a cord. A dirt track in the midst of the Horn of Africa, chock-full of children, plastic and clapped-out minibuses. So does it exist or not, this state of Somaliland? It exists, because it has a president, a parliament, controlled territory… and even universities, state hospitals and an army. It doesn’t exist because no-one, or practically no-one, recognises it. A ghost country. Which, in 2011 celebrates its twentieth anniversary, but has no voice with which to tell it to the world.


Officially, Hargeisa – the capital – is still in Somalia. It resembles a primitive version of Sardinia: land inhabited by shepherds, sea by pirates. We are asking for a ransom to compensate the fishermen for the damage caused to the local economy by global traffic – says Hassan Ahmed Abdì, one of the Somali pirate captains, interviewed in his prison cell – the minute I get out of here, I shall return to fight this battle». Pirate, like other impoverished fishermen. Religion: Islam. Law: Shari’a. Currency: kilos of local shillings, a wad of flimsy notes to make up a dollar.


A country that wakes up early in the morning, bargains for camels at the market and then, at lunch-time, retreats indoors to chew khat, twigs with mildly amphetamine leaves. In the long run, its impact on the nation’s nervous system is corrosive. The women’s eyes tell myriad tales, while smiles are very few and far between. Years passed under the niqab. As far as the cord and that border, where the girls, crammed into the minibuses that shuttle to and fro, tear it from their faces, as though the day of liberation had come.

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To Save a Child | Photographer: Steve Mccurry

To Save a Child | Photographer: Steve Mccurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"It was a privilege to go to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their work to end the practice of mingi and to house and and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued.

I met John in Burma a few years ago. He is a photographer and successful businessman who has founded companies which develop software for digital media and the entertainment industry..." - Steve Mccurry



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Global Village | Travel photographer: David Duchemin

Global Village | Travel photographer: David Duchemin | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Images from the vanishing rural life. With the momentum of urbanization we're losing the simplicity and beauty of village life." - David Duchemin


David duChemin is a world & humanitarian assignment photographer, best-selling author, digital publisher, and international workshop leader whose nomadic and adventurous life fuels his fire to create and share. Based in Vancouver, Canada, when he’s home, David leads a nomadic life chasing compelling images on all 7 continents.

When on assignment David creates powerful images that convey the hope and dignity of children, the vulnerable and oppressed for the international NGO community. When creating the art he so passionately shares, David strives to capture the beauty of the natural world.


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Uganda Color | Photographer: Gloria Feinstein

Uganda Color | Photographer: Gloria Feinstein | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

“For the past six years I’ve been making photographs of the children living at St. Mary Kevin Orphanage in Uganda. These kids have lost one or both parents to disease or civil war. I founded a not-for-profit organization called Change the Truth shortly after my first visit in 2006. Since then, these children have become part of my extended family. I spend most of the year raising funds to help provide food, medical care and school fees for them. Without assistance, their futures would be dim. Once a year I return to the orphanage to spend time with them and make pictures. This past December I ventured outside the walls of the orphanage to meet and photograph some of the people living in the surrounding village."

 

"The warm, generous Ugandans I have met along the way love having their picture taken; in some cases my pictures have been the first they have ever seen of themselves. The children at the orphanage and in the village feel that because I share my photographs with so many once I return to America, they are surely quite famous! They also know that the photographs I make give them a voice they might not otherwise have; this voice leads to a raising of awareness about their plight and a positive change in their lives.”

- Gloria Baker Feinstein

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Congoloses wrestlers | Photographer: Colin Delfosse

Congoloses wrestlers | Photographer: Colin Delfosse | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Kinshasa, 2010. Eight million inhabitants, thousands of shegués (street children), hundreds of wrestlers and their brass bands. Edingwe, Dragon, City Train, Mbokotomo : the “legends” of Congolese wrestling invent themselves on a daily basis in the outskirts of Kinshasa. Body-building, and even black magic enthusiasts fight for glory in makeshift rings. They come from the streets and their charisma commands respect and admiration. But the heros of the ring are modest in victory : « Kobeta libanga papa mundele » [we manage, white man]. In the last hours of the day, when they have hung up their everyday “occupations”, they put on masks and wrestling kit ready to fight. The motorised parade of wrestlers attracts crowds from the dusty streets of Massina, Ngili and Matete, towns round the Congolese capital. In back yards, on the tables of the street cafés, or even in the street, the spell casters warm up over primus stoves and cannabis. The ring is hastily set up, the judge climbs onto the ropes. “Let the match begin!” The fight starts and is usually more or less fixed. Rounds follow one another until the final spell is cast, until the adversary is floored, until the next fight.

 

Graduated in journalism, Colin Delfosse turned to documentary photography in 2005, and became one of the founding members of the Out of Focus collective.

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Children of the Omo | Photographer: Steve Mc Curry

Children of the Omo | Photographer:  Steve Mc Curry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia. It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley, with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. "


" The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley live without clean drinking water and without medical care. It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued. " 

 

" Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer,  learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture. " - Steve McCurry

Photo report's insight:

More information: http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

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Juanlu Corrales's curator insight, October 19, 2014 4:44 AM

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Translations | Photographer: Sofie Knijff

Translations | Photographer: Sofie Knijff | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Over the past years, Sofie Knijff has travelled across South Africa, India, Mali, Brazil, Iceland and Greenland to portray children and their fantasy worlds & dreams. Her aim was to isolate them from their surroundings, and daily lives, and focus their attention to reveal their own “dream character”. By using the same backdrop, she created a stage on which the dreams could come to life. The challenge was to build a subtle and yet sustained level concentration to capture the moment of transformation. At the same time, she took images of the empty spaces in which the same children live; allowing to create a set of images where the inside and outside mirror and influence one another. The impact of time underpins this project." - Sophie Knijff 

Photo report's insight:

Belgian-born photographer Sofie Knijff has spent the last three years traveling the world making portraits of children and asking them one question: what do you want to be when you grow up? With limitless imagination the children answer, dressing up as their future selves in a series she calls Translations. By using similar backdrops for each child, Knijff strips them of their current surroundings in order to focus more intimately on their “dream characters.”

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South Sudan | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres

South Sudan | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Internally displaced waiting transport to return to their native land. Great part of internally displaced persons who fled during the war years now are retornees in southern Sudan. With the next referendum for self determination in southern Sudan many displaced return to live in their own country . Those living in north are afraid about the new political situation and return to south

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Congo (Belge) | Photographer: Carl de Keyzer

Congo (Belge) | Photographer: Carl de Keyzer | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

As a member of Magnum for almost 20 years, Belgian photographer Carl de Keyzer has published several books, shooting projects across the globe in Europe, Russia, Asia, and the U.S. His strength lies in his ability to consistently capture pointed, expressive moments within daily life. For the photographs in Congo, he took five trips over two years to document the life of a post-colonial nation. “I decided to use a 1954 tourist guide for the Congo – at that time still a Belgian colony. Visiting all kinds of colonial backgrounds – mines, factories, schools, monasteries, churches, prisons. In fact it’s more a project about Belgium itself. A small European country (80 times smaller) being arrogant enough to export their own surrealism to the heart of Africa.”

 

The photographs were made into a series of two books in 2009 and 2010,Congo (Belge) and Congo Belge en images. The first book consisted of his contemporary photographs (tour guide) and the second included a selection of remastered glass negatives of the birth of the colony (1890 – 1920). Each photograph implies a story or carries a message—all focus on the people in the situation, all cross the line between straightforward photojournalism and a richer, more artful documentary style. “I tend to engage in long-term projects. I prefer to stay in a country for a longish period in order to get a better feeling of what is going on there. I prefer complex images because they reflect the complexity of life itself. There is a conflict between the utilitarian aspect of certain images taken for a precise purpose and photographs expressing a more personal viewpoint. I am always somewhere in the middle. Can you really grasp a situation through a picture? Yes, perhaps. You try, even if you stay a stranger looking in from the outside. What you are aiming at is photographs showing situations that have repercussions on people’s lives. That is why I am a photographer.”

Photo report's insight:

Link info:
The portfolio is on Projects : 2009 Congo (Belge)

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Ethiopia | Photojournalist: Ami Vitale

Ethiopia  | Photojournalist: Ami Vitale | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"This journey across Ethiopia traces the origination of coffee that goes back to the thirteenth century. Legend says that a herder named Kaldi noticed his goats “dancing” after nibbling bright red berries. Kaldi brought the berries to a nearby monastery where holy men declared they must be the work of the devil and threw them into a fire. Yet, the aroma was too tempting and they quickly raked the roasted beans from the embers, ground them up, and dissolved them in hot water, yielding the world’s first cup of coffee." - Ami Vitale

Photo report's insight:

Ami Vitale  is an American photojournalist and documentary film maker.  Her photographs have been exhibited around the world in museums and galleries and published in international magazines including National Geographic, Geo, Newsweek, Time and Smithsonian, among others. She is an internationally known and respected journalist whose work has garnered multiple World Press Photos awards, the Photographer of the Year International award, the Lowell Thomas Award for Travel Journalism, Lucie awards, the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding Reporting, and the Magazine Photographer of the Year award by the National Press Photographers Association.

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Port de Casablanca | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Port de Casablanca | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The daily fishing Casablanca - Thursday, April 25, I completed a mission video report. I had one free day to buy some slippers for my girls. I thought visiting the "Chinatown" where are located the last ten years of Chinese who speaks fluent Moroccan. But one day, it's a little short. I talk to the driver of the Taxi Small red, hoping to get ideas. He then advised me to visit the Hassan II Mosque and the Corniche. I'm not excited ...

 

It is from there that we pass the commercial port where boats are moored in huge containers. I ask my taxi stop at the entrance. I am very excited but the customs head blocks my way. I need a permission from the maritime prefecture. A sailor decides to accompany me. The reputation of the Moroccan diligence is not a legend. An official of the prefecture tells me he must ask permission from the CCM Rabat (Moroccan Cinematographic Centre) for any report in the port area governed by customs.

 

Damn it, it would take a week. Disappointed, I was about to leave when I was offered to go to the fishing port to photograph the fishing trawlers. The official deliver me permission to photograph and a badge. 

Photo report's insight:

The port of Casablanca is considered as Morocco's and as one of the largest artificial ports in the world, although the port of Tangiers-Med to the North of Morocco is a cargo port located about 40 km from Tangiers, and is the largest port on the Mediterranean and in Africa by capacity and went into service in July 2007. Its initial capacity was 3.5 million shipment containers. It is also the largest port of the Maghreb and North Africa.

 

Casablanca's port treats a traffic of more than 21,3 million tons per annum, that is to say 38% of the national traffic, and carries out a sales turnover of more than 894 Million Moroccan Dirhams. With an extent of 605 hectares and extending to more than 8 kilometers in length. It can accommodate and treat more than 35 ships at the same time.

 

The port is managed by ODEP (Office D'Exploitation des Ports), a publicly owned establishment which has the principal role of ensuring the management of passengers, goods and ships forwarding by the Moroccan ports.

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Omo Valley | Photographer: Steve McCurry

Omo Valley | Photographer: Steve McCurry | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

It was a privilege to go to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph the work he is doing with Lale Labuko in their work to end the practice of mingi and to house and shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued.


I met John in Burma a few years ago. He is a photographer and successful businessman who has founded companies which develop software for digital media and the entertainment industry. 
He has also devoted a tremendous amount of time, energy, and financial assistance to the work of Omo Child. Lale was born into the Kara Tribe in the Omo River Valley.  He was one of the first of his tribe to receive a formal education.

 

That opportunity led him to realize the critical importance of ending the tribal ritual of Mingi. Lale lost two sisters to Mingi. Outlawing and stopping this devastating practice of Mingi is his life’s mission. - Steve Mccurry

Photo report's insight:

Please join me to help John and Lale rescue and care for these children.
http://www.omochild.org

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Living with the Hamer Tribe - Photographer | Mitchell Kanashkevich

Living with the Hamer Tribe - Photographer | Mitchell Kanashkevich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Around the middle of the road between two of Southern Ethiopia's larger towns - Arba Minch and Jinka, there is a signboard that reads "Welcome to Hamer." The sign marks a dusty road that continues for almost to 100 km, through African bush, towards the region of Turmi, the heart of the Hamer tribe.

The Hamers are one of the majority tribes in Ethiopia's ethnically diverse Omo Valley. They are proud and self-reliant, depending only on nature, their animals and their land for survival. Virtually everything about their world has a strong connection to the world of their ancestors, very little has been accepted from the outside. - Mitchell Kanashkevich


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Pavel Gospodinov's curator insight, January 13, 2013 1:31 PM

amazing photography and story really....

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Religion and Life in Tigray | Travel photographer: Mitchell Kanashkevich

Religion and Life in Tigray | Travel photographer: Mitchell Kanashkevich | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Ethiopian Church is one of the oldest in the world, dating back to 4th Century AD, when Orthodox Christianity was made the official religion of the Axumite Kingdom, present day Ethiopian region of Tigray. Over the centuries, Christianity has shaped the people's psyche, as well as the landscape of Tigray, where hundreds of churches and monasteries have been erected and even carved right into mountain faces, so abundant in the region.

 

Modern-day Tigray has been at the cross roads of natural disasters, conflict and political turmoil. These difficulties have led to virtually no development in much of the region's rural areas. While the lack of development has translated into relatively low living standards, the scarcity of contact with the modern-world has also meant that Christian Ethiopia's ancient culture, traditions and history have been preserved in Tigray's remote corners better than virtually anywhere else.

 

In Tigray, even the most remote and the most ancient of the churches and monasteries still function and the people in nearby villages still go about their lives much as they have for hundreds of years. " (Mitchell Kanashkevich)

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L'Afrique | Photographer: Jonathan May

L'Afrique | Photographer: Jonathan May | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Jonathan May is an advertising and fine art photographer originally from Australia. He is currently based in Moscow but lately finds himself spending majority of his time shooting in Australia and Africa.

His project L’Afrique materialized from an assignment in Africa from a French client. The project includes images from from Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast and Kenya but Jonathan plans more visits to West Africa/Francophone speaking countries in the future.

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Voodoo | Photographer Dan Kitwood.

Voodoo | Photographer Dan Kitwood. | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

The little known nation of Benin is tiny by African standards, sat in the gulf of Guinea hemmed in by the might of Nigeria on its Eastern flank and Togo to the West, with the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean lapping along its palm fringed beaches. This former French colony is rich in colonial history; home to the “Slave Coast” of Ouidah, and the spiritual birthplace of Voodoo.

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