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Fujifilm X100T Hands-on Review | Kai Wong

Fujifilm X100T Hands-on Review | Kai Wong | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it


The X100T is the third iteration of the ever-popular X100 series of cameras from Fuji - an APS-C sensor compact camera with retro-chic looks - and the successor to the X100S. But what?s new and is this a worthy upgrade? The team went to the Occupy Central protests to test out the camera......


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Fuji X-E2 Hands-On Field Test | Nathan Elson


We loved the original Fuji X-E1, so we were looking forward to checking out its replacement, the X-E2. Fortunately, legendary photographer Nathan Elson was available to help us review the camera.....


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Thomas Menk's curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:46 AM

Nathan´s website and some more X-E2 pictures:

http://nathanelson.com/fuji-xe-2-review-w-the-camera-store/

Mike Croshaw Photos's curator insight, October 25, 2013 6:12 AM

Very fun review, make sure you watch the last bit ( poor XE-1!!).

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THERE’S A BETTER WAY – Fuji X100s review | Olaf Sztaba

THERE’S A BETTER WAY – Fuji X100s review | Olaf Sztaba | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it

Remember when you bought your first digital SLR camera? You thought, “What a piece of engineering!” You opened the box and took the first glance as excitement and joy ran through your veins. No more film, no more limitations and the ability to take as many photos as you want. The world was your oyster. You went through the manual and the number of options, menus and settings left you gasping. While the battery was still charging you were already planning your first photo endeavour. Then you ran outside with your shiny new camera and started shooting like mad. After all, with digital there are no limits. In the evenings you hit the Internet. You were sure you had the best camera on the market. You read all the reviews that were proving your point. But wait, you thought, “Maybe I should get a better lens, a better-rated lens.” You scratched together all the money you could and bought a huge, beautiful pro-rated lens. “Now I can take really stunning photos!” you cried. You drove to the nearest park and photographed everything around you: benches, trees, leaves, people, even hydrants. You uploaded your photos, looked at them at 100%, and admired sharpness and dynamic range. Again, you went on the Internet, hit the blogs, forums and ratings and thought, “If only I had a telephoto lens, I could take even more amazing photos.” The next day you visited your local dealer and came back with a massive telephoto 2.8 pro-rated. WOW!


But wait! Another question hit you. “How I am going to carry all this equipment?” You ran back to the store and picked the largest and best camera backpack you could afford. Daily you carried the backpack with your expensive SLR and superb lenses and took hundreds of photos. Sure the bag was heavy and the camera overwhelming but you told yourself, “This is the price I have to pay for top quality.” You justified an inconvenience. You kept uploading your photos to the computer, then processing and uploading them on the Internet. Next, you repeated your mantra about your camera’s superiority. You followed this sequence religiously every day. But despite your best efforts, photography had become an almost robot-like endeavour. Then it hit you. Something was not right! You noticed that others were taking much more interesting photos that were more engaging, more powerful. You went through them, you counted every pixel and you compared. Sure their photos were not as sharp as yours, the resolution was lower, the dynamic range was nowhere near yours but somehow their images were so much better and more interesting. You grumbled to yourself, “It is not possible! After all, I spent thousands on my equipment and I feel I am going nowhere!” You nervously studied the 300-page manual and asked yourself, “Maybe I am missing some settings? If only I knew how to set up…” You fell asleep with the manual as your pillow. Next day in the field you set up a tripod, put your brand new, huge, super-fast lens on your camera, went through your settings, played with all the buttons and you came back home… with even more mediocre photos. Your frustration was growing. Where is the joy? Where is the passion? Should I buy a better lens? Should I change my in-camera settings? Weeks and months passed and you left your heavy backpack at home more often. You became unengaged and uninspired. You started avoiding photography. What a chore it had become! You think, “Maybe that’s just how it is. Maybe I am overreacting. Maybe this is the new normal.”  The following day you bumped into a kid next door and he showed you a few photos he had taken with his iPhone. You immediately dismissed the quality and told him to buy a real camera but deep down you admired his images, creativity and passion. You went home depressed and discouraged. Then, one day you came across your old friend who was holding a small and interesting camera. Out of respect and curiosity, you took it, looked through the viewfinder and played with the controls. At first, you felt hostile towards this tiny camera. After all, at home you had whole backpack of expensive gear. But deep inside you had a strange feeling. Something drew you closer. It was the strange but familiar feeling you had when you shot Leica or Contax film cameras. You could not stop thinking about the little camera you held in your hands today. After a few days of internal struggle you decided to go for it. You realized what had been missing.


How many of you have had a similar experience? I did.........


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PeterPrism's comment, May 3, 2013 5:08 PM
Thomas you are mentioned in this article "Finally, “Scoop It” by Thomas Menk should be bookmarked and followed; it has great photographs and insights." Cheers
Thomas Menk's comment, May 4, 2013 3:12 AM
Thx Peter for your comment and thx to Olaf for his nice mention :-)
Michael Petersen's curator insight, May 4, 2013 8:44 PM

There are so many new camera coming out it is hard to keep up

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Fujifilm X-E1 Review | Thom Hogan

Fujifilm X-E1 Review | Thom Hogan | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it


Final Words


I liked the X-Pro1. I like the X-E1 just a tiny bit more, mostly because of the slightly smaller size and diopter on the EVF. In shooting with the X-Pro1 I found that, over time, I relied upon the optical side of the hybrid viewfinder less and less. Lenses poke into the frame in the optical view, and getting precise framing with the optical view is not possible. Given my personal preference for getting framing dead on in camera, if possible, I flipped the switch to the EVF an awful lot on my X-Pro1. With the X-E1 I'm not really missing the optical viewfinder; I don't find myself trying to flip out of the EVF view. Given that we now have a very capable zoom lens in the XF mount (the 18-55mm f/2.8-4), the reliance on an EVF goes up a little more. I do wish the EVF had a higher refresh rate, but I can live with what Fujifilm gave us, especially at the price point. Since I try not to keep cameras around that I'm not using, I can also speak to the ultimate decider: I've decided to sell my X-Pro1. I don't need two XF bodies, and I value the compactness of the X-E1 more than the hybrid viewfinder of the X-Pro1, so it's an easy decision. Aside: I'd guess that Fujifilm will update the X-Pro1 in 2013. In so doing, I also suspect that they would try to add a few features to differentiate that model from the X-E1. There aren't a lot of obvious such features, but a positionable LCD might be one. Both are good cameras, and you need to make sure that none of the small list of differences tilts you one way or the other, but in terms of performance, they're essentially equal. The great JPEG quality Fujifilm is known for is present equally in both cameras. The handling is the same, though slightly miniaturized in a couple of places on the X-E1. The raw files are the same. The build quality is in the same league with both. In short, near identical twins, with only a couple of small feature differences differentiating them. The lower price helps tilt things the X-E1's way, too. At the US$1000 body price, it's going up against the NEX-6 and NEX-7, the Olympus OM-D E-M5, and not much else. And it holds its own on the image quality side. Indeed, the X-E1 would be the best low light camera of that group. It would also be the slowest focusing camera of that group. The X-E1 has the most straightforward and understandable controls and menus of that group. The OM-D E-M5 has a wider range of lenses and accessories, but the existing Fujifilm lenses are all quite good—there's not a truly weak performer in the bunch (at least so far). Note that the X-Pro1, at US$400 more, has only the hybrid viewfinder to further stand out against those competitors. So kudos to Fujifilm. They took a fine camera, did some careful liposuction and one feature cut, and didn't harm the patient at all. If anything, they created a slightly more compelling product due to the lower price point. One last point: if you're into Leica lenses, the X-E1 is like the X-Pro1: with the Fujifilm M-mount adapter and the built-in lens corrections, these X-Trans cameras are the best crop sensor Leica M-mount option out there.

 


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The Fuji X Pro 1 and Nikkor Lenses part II | Jim Gamblin

The Fuji X Pro 1 and Nikkor Lenses part II | Jim Gamblin | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it


This lens and the Nikon D700 were my first choice to take along on a trip, when wanting to travel light. The 50mm angle of view being the most versatile of fixed focal length lenses. So it was my feeling that on the Fuji with it’s APS-C sized sensor, that this would become one of my favorite lenses to use with the Fuji XP1, as I also use an 85mm on the Nikon FX cameras.

As we all know “great expectations” can be just that. In this case it did not happen. Don’t get me wrong I still like this lens very much. Unlike it’s more modern counter parts (i.e. the new Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 G) I actually like some of it’s “un-corrected” aspects. However my first impression on the Fuji were not great.

 

http://www.jimgamblin.com/blog/

 


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i1Display Pro review

i1Display Pro review | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it
review of the i1Display pro monitor profilier and calibrator, includes projector calibration.
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ColorMunki Display review

ColorMunki Display review | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it

Review of the ColorMunki Display monitor profiler and calibrator, includes projector calibration.

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Sony SLT-A65 Review - Digital Photography Review

Sony SLT-A65 Review - Digital Photography Review | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it

"Just Posted: our review of the Sony SLT-A65. When the SLT-A65 was launched it risked being overshadowed by the flagship A77 model. However, the A65 could prove to be the more significant camera in the SLT line-up as it offers many of the A77's features at a more attainable price point. Offering 24MP capture, a 10fps continuous shooting rate, full-time live view with phase-detection AF as well as a raft of other innovative features, the A65 is unique in its market segment. On paper, it appears significantly more capable in some respects than peers such as the Canon EOS 600D / Rebel T3i and Nikon D5100. Does it live up to that promise?"

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Review of the Sony DSLR-A580 - DPreview

Review of the Sony DSLR-A580 - DPreview | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it
Our review of the Sony DSLR A580. With all the progress Sony has been making with its mirrorless and 'translucent' mirror technologies, it's easy to overlook the company's continued development of its two-sensor liveview DSLRs. The A580 is the latest (and possibly last?) in a line that started with the promising but quirky A350. The A550 was a big step forwards for these feature-packed enthusiast DSLRs and the A580 takes this progress further with the addition of Sony's excellent 16MP sensor. Offering all the usual Sony processing cleverness - such as sweep panorama, in-camera HDR and multi-shot noise reduction - the only apparent cloud in its sky is the existence of the less expensive, full-time liveview sister model, the SLT A55.
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Nikon D7000 Review

Nikon D7000 Review | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it
This long overdue Nikon D7000 review is based on my 30 day experience with the camera. Due to my busy schedule and a very high ...
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Fujifilm X-T1 Hands-on Review | Kai Wong for DigitalRev TV


We take a look at Fujifilm's latest X-series camera - the X-T1. It's an eagerly anticipated mirrorless camera but is it as good as people expect it to be or has it fallen short of the mark? Kai takes it out on the streets for a test......


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Mike Croshaw Photos's curator insight, February 26, 2014 4:09 AM

These guys always do a fun review and this one is no exceptin.

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Soul Mate | The Fujinon XF 23mm F1.4 R | Patrick La Roque

Soul Mate | The Fujinon XF 23mm F1.4 R | Patrick La Roque | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it


I’d like to apologize in advance: if you were hoping not to feel the urge to part with some of your money, I don’t think this review will be much help. As I told my buddy Morten Byskov in an email when I first got my hands on this lens: damn. When I originally reviewed the X-Pro1 I defined it as something that was clearly “part of a system”, as a camera that by its very nature felt much less intimate than the X100 (the only other X camera at the time). Much has changed since I wrote that review: more X bodies have appeared, the entire ecosystem has exploded with stellar Fuji offerings as well as Zeiss and other third-party lenses added to the mix for good measure; it’s rather phenomenal when you think about it — it hasn’t been that long. But while I came to love the X-Pro1 just as much as the X100 — albeit for different reasons — it still always felt like an extremely refined cog in an ever evolving system. Until now. With the introduction of the XF 23mm f1.4 R lens (B&H), Fuji finally brings the long-awaited 35mm field of view to the X-series, something that was previously only available with an X100/S or via an adapted lens. We could certainly argue about the why’s of such a long delay for an indisputably classic focal length — marketing conspiracies et all — but I doubt anyone will be faulting the execution: saying this was worth the wait is a serious understatement There are many intangibles about using a camera, the way it sits in our hands, how different pieces come together and fall into place. At the risk of sounding way too hyperbolic, here’s the short version of this review: I feel as though the X-Pro1 has just found its long lost sibling – The balance, the size, the weight, the focusing, the build… Everything about this lens feels exactly right to me. Soul mates, baby.....


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A Journey Through Venice: The Fuji X100s Review | MirrorLessons

A Journey Through Venice: The Fuji X100s Review | MirrorLessons | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it


What I like about the Fuji X100s

 

- Wonderful design, excellent build quality

- The aperture ring on the lens, the shutter speed dial like old film cameras

- The hybrid viewfinder

- Amazing quality of the RAW files

- Beautiful colour rendition, especially with the Astia Film Simlation mode

- Great dynamic range

- Tiny, lightweight, quiet, it is a perfect tool for street photography

What I don’t like about the Fuji X100s

 

- Autofocus still needs some improvements

- Poor battery life. I highly recommend buying a second battery if you plan to be out all day.

- Video mode only automatic, quality could be better given the great X100s sensor;

- The lens isn’t extremely sharp at f/2 (but is still usable) and has some distortion. I had hoped that Fuji would have improved on it.

 

 

Despite a few weak points, I really enjoyed using the X100s and it is definitely a camera that I will bring with me for day-to-day photography. It is fast, silent and discreet, and you can even choose to silence the shutter button. No one will notice you when you use it. However, at the same time, it will never become my main camera system. The reason is probably personal, but if I were to visit a place for the first time, I would probably miss a wide angle lens and a medium telephoto lens as I like to diversify my shots and represent a place from different angles and perspectives.

I liked shooting with it in Venice as I had already visited the city. Moreover, thanks to the Fuji X100s’ fixed lens, I was able to concentrate on one single type of photography (street photography), and this proved to be a very good exercise. As I said before, it is a niche camera – you have to know why you are buying it and for what you intend to use it. If street photography isn’t your genre of choice, the x100s probably isn’t the best camera for you. I have to admit that I am not an avid street shooter, and sometimes all I wanted was to be closer to my subject (I did some cropping in a few pictures). The RAF (Fuji RAW) files are another aspect that really impressed me. The dynamic range is huge and the amount of detail you can recover in both the shadows and highlights is stunning. I rarely work with such good RAW files coming from a camera like this one. You can really see the quality of the X-Trans sensor. High ISO images have little noise and an overall filmic “look” that is quite pleasant to the eye.

 


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Fuji X-E1 Review by Nick Devlin | Luminous-Landscape

Fuji X-E1 Review by Nick Devlin | Luminous-Landscape | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it

 

Fuji has been on fire with its mirrorless cameras. Starting with the ground-breaking X100, and carrying through to the unique X-Pro1, Fuji has been pushing the bar in compact, rangefinder-style devices. Now, with the release of the X-E1, the company is aiming to bring their line to a broader, more main-stream audience. I recently had a chance to spend a couple of days with a production-level sample. Much The Same But So Very Different. On its face, the X-E1 is the X-Pro1 without the hybrid viewfinder. But the reality is more complicated than that. The X-Pro1 is the recent pinnacle of ‘look ma – no hands!’ technological achievement. In it, Fuji managed to integrate multi-point autofocus and a variable magnification optical viewfinder into a rangefinder-style camera with interchangeable lenses. To cap it off, they slipped in the best APS-C sensor in the business. All was goodness and light, right? Well, mostly. As I noted in my comprehensive review here in March, the X-Pro1 is an amazing camera, but at a not-insubstantial price and at a size pushing the limits of “rangefinder style”. For some users it is the ultimate solution. But for the masses interested in a more economical solution, with more flexibility of use, the X-Pro1 might have been more camera than they needed or wanted. So enter the X-E1. The X-E1 is basically the same camera as the X-Pro1, but with only an EVF. The optical window is gone. With it too is gone a surprisingly amount of bulk. The X-E1 is much closer in size and girth to the X100. While on paper, and even to the eye, the differences are not that large, the effect in the hand is noticeable. To me, the X-E1 is just the right size. Anyone who tried the X-Pro1 and found it a bit too big will be very happy now. So that’s it, right? Same functions, same controls, same sensor, just smaller and cheaper. Yes…but….. While that might capture the physical differences, conceptually, the X-E1 seems like something much different than its close relatives. Despite its undeniably range-finder style form-factor, this is in truth a mirrorless system camera. And that’s not a bad thing. But it is a seminal difference....


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Kevin Sparrow Discusses the Fuji X-Pro1 and Cycling

Kevin Sparrow Discusses the Fuji X-Pro1 and Cycling | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it

I’ve known Kevin Sparrow for some time now. I wouldn’t say we go way back, but in internet time, we’ve been around, doing relatively the same kind of work for a few years. Kevin’s someone I look up to, not only as a photographer, but as a person and a passionate artist. When he and I spoke a few months back about photography, he mentioned he was thinking of ditching his Canon 7D for the Fuji X-Pro1. I didn’t know what to think but after reading his words and seeing these photos, I can’t blame him! Read on below for one of the most in-depth reviews I’ve ever had on this blog....


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X-Rite ColorMunki Review

X-Rite ColorMunki Review | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it
ColorMunki review.New X-Rite device for monitor calibration and printer profiling...
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Gura Gear

Gura Gear | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it

"Camera bags are part necessary evil and part obsession. If you’re like me, over the years, our closets and basement storage areas begin to overflow with past grasps at the Holy Grail – a bag that is comfortable to carry and fits everything we need, without feeling like it has everything we own in it. And, just as there is an endless number of photographers yearning for a better bag, an ever growing number of companies are offering their own take on the solution to the intractable laws of physics; laws which cruelly dictate that carrying heavy things is, and always will be, heavy and uncomfortable.

Of late, the camera bag market has become both crowded and intensely competitive. Bags are better made, more functional and less expensive than they have ever been. For nature and outdoor shooters, who by definition need to carry a good deal of gear to their subjects, this abundance of choice is a blessing.

The upstart boutique bag maker Gura Gear entered this extremely competitive field in 2008 with their signature Kiboko backpack, now known as the Kiboko 30L. The brainchild of wildlife photographer Andy Biggs (and his equally bag-loving design team), the Kiboko 30L is a light-weight yet gargantuan bag, capable of carrying a baby hippo to safety, all in a standard carry-on-compliant package. For shooters who routinely travel with a retinue of super-telephoto lenses, or extensive flash kits, the 30L was just the ticket. Carrying that much gear is a dirty job, which the Kiboko did very well.

For me, however, the Kiboko 30L was simply bigger than I needed and, ironically, too good at its game. A full Kiboko 30L could be like, well, carrying a baby hippo to safety, albeit as comfortably as possible (see above re: merciless laws of physics). So I took a pass and continued using my beaten and world-weary bag from one of the mainstream manufacturers. In my case, the old standby was a Lowerpro Computrekker 200AW, a bag which has proven really reliable and able to fit almost whatever I threw at it. This Lowe bag hit what I consider the sweet-spot in terms of size, fitting the most restrictive international carry-on standard, yet able to swallow a 15” laptop and a full MF kit, or a really large 35mm kit, or some combination of both.

In late 2011, Gura Gear kicked it up a notch with two new bags, one Kiboko 22L+ targeted at exactly this mainstream backpack niche."

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Review: Think Tank Retrospective 5 Camera Bag

Review: Think Tank Retrospective 5 Camera Bag | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it
The Think Tank Retrospective 5 bag: Photographer tested, Shiba approved. Ever since I started regularly heading out with smaller, lighter gear like my EPL2, X100, and even Nikon FM, I’ve been yearning for an appropriate bag. I have a “carry everything bag” already, so what I need here is a bag that will carry just what I need for a particular outing. The requirements were pretty simple: durable, comfortable, portable yet efficient, and most importantly, inconspicuous.
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Just posted: Pentax K-r full review

Just posted: Pentax K-r full review | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it
Just Posted: Our full review of the Pentax K-r upper entry-level DSLR. When we reviewed the Pentax K-x in December 2009 we thought it was a little cracker. The K-r builds on this by adding visible AF points, a higher ISO range and faster continuous shooting to the K-x's aklready successful feature mix but the competition has not been standing still. Click on the link to read how the Pentax K-r fared in our studio tests and how it stacks up to its latest peers in the upper entry-level bracket of the market.
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Just Posted: Olympus E-PL2 in-depth review

Just Posted: Olympus E-PL2 in-depth review | Photography Gear News | Scoop.it
Just Posted: Our review of the Olympus E-PL2 beginner-friendly Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera. The PEN E-PL2 offers a very ...
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