Photo Retouching Techniques
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[ DOWNLOADS ] | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Download RAW footage from my projects, follow along with the tutorials and
master your craft! www.mattscottvisuals.com
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Free Raw Practice Files & Discounts For RA Members — The Retouching Academy Lab

Free Raw Practice Files & Discounts For RA Members — The Retouching Academy Lab | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
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Retouching Academy | Retouching Education For Professionals

Retouching Academy | Retouching Education For Professionals | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Retouching Education for Professionals
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How to Edit with VSCO Film | Harsh light in the Presidio of San Francisco

San Francisco Bay Area photographer Diane Villadsen shares her editing process using preset 400H+1 from VSCO Film Pack 6 in Lightroom. For more VSCO editing ...
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Timeline Photos - Glenn Meling Photography | Facebook

Timeline Photos - Glenn Meling Photography | Facebook | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Planet Hulk
www.glennmeling.com

How it was made: http://tiny.cc/cokn8x
What is Planet Hulk: http://tiny.cc/krkn8x
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Photography podcasts- Fulltimephotographer.com | 181: Erik Almas: Growing and changing through photography

Photography podcasts- Fulltimephotographer.com | 181: Erik Almas: Growing and changing through photography | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
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Making Products Look Perfect In Photoshop - YouTube

Website: http://phlearn.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Phlearn Twitter: https://twitter.com/aknacer Google+: https://plus.google.com/105267656376269...
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Before and After: Phil Wenger

Before and After: Phil Wenger | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
“We left the Location through the back door and ran through the rain
for 30 meters”

An image broke the record books of our groups this week and we are happy to
tell you the story about it. Phil Wenger took this awesome shot in
Switzerland on August the 1st. Let him tell us the story about it !

1/40sec, f1.4, ISO 2000, Flash Power Manual: 1/32 - Kodak Ektar 100 Cool


It was a very Special wedding day for me. First it was August 1st, that's
the National Holiday (Like 4th Juli in the USA) in Switzerland, plus the
groom is a very good wedding photographer himself. So I felt some pressure
on my shoulders and I really planed some exceptional shots, something
unique and something i havn't tried bevor.

We spent a wonderful wedding day and had a great bridal shooting in the
morning where i was able to already take one of my unique shots through an
old Rolleiflex (loaded with a Illford BW film) which they already loved
very much. 

Taken with an old Rolleiflex

At about 10pm in the evening it started to rain again, a little more than
on the rest of the day. That's when I walked to the bridal couple and asked
them, if they are willing to do a special shot in the rain. They did not
hesitate and told me that they fully trust me and if I think it's worth it,
they will follow me.

I prepared the wireless flash trigger, set the camera to the settings i
believed might work and grabbed one of the guests and asked him if he is
willing to join us for a very short rain photo session. His job was to
stand behind the couple and hold the Flash. He was like: "Oh that's great,
that sounds interesting". For the bridal couple I gave the instructions
that they just should stand still, look at each others, maybe give a little
kiss and only move very slowly.

So we left the Location through the back door, ran through the rain for
like 30meters and stopped in a very dark place right next to a patch of
grass. I tried to autofocus but it was too dark. We didn't had the time to
look for a mobilephone or some other light source  so i switched my lens to
manual focus. I took the first image and quickly checked the camera
display. Sadly. it was a little bit too bright.

First shot, ISO too high ( Pretty awesome anyways !!! ) 

So i lowered the ISO to 2000 and took another image. It looked good on the
display so I shot around 10 Images while moving the Manual Focus ring
slowly Forward and backwards. From the first Picture to the last it only
took 20seconds. After that we ran back to the house. 

Some of the other shots from the series

The gear that he used

* Canon 1dx
* Sigma 35mm Art f1.4
* Canon EX600RT Flash
* Phottix Strato II Wireless Flash Trigger

We were all very wet. The camera and flash were totally covered with water
drops. I quickly looked through the images and showed them to the bride and
groom and we were all totally blown away.

We went back in and a lot of guests looked at us and asked: "Why are you
guys so wet?"
I really appreciated the couples trust and believe in me and i'm really
thankful for moments like this. I always try to go a Little further than
others and this time it really worked. I know, the idea of a rainshot is
nothing new, there are a lot of other artists who did that before and maybe
more professional. Nonetheless,  i believe that this picture means a lot to
the bride and groom and also to me.

I'm really thankful for all this.
 

Unedited - SOOC image


Follow the amazing work of Phil his website his Facebook our latest updates
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Before and After: Alexis Matehuala

Before and After: Alexis Matehuala | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Edited image with Kodak Gold 100 Warm - CLICK IMAGE FOR FULL VIEW

One image from Alexis Matehuala took the record for the most likes past
week and we were very curious about it. The girl on the image is the
daughter of Alexis and the little baby of the family. They headed outside
to their backyard at around 7pm to catch some beautiful evening light and
have some water fun since they were not able to mate it to the pool that
day.

The image was shot with the Nikon D750 and the Sigma 35mm Art ( 1/2000s - f
2.0 - ISO 240 )

   

Enough talking ! Let us enjoy the image one more time and take a look at
the wonderful unedited image. The power of the D750 really comes to play in
here.

Unedited image from the Nikon D750

  Follow the amazing work of Alexis her website her instagram Our other
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2015 Before and After Lukas Piatek Comment Before and After: Sergio
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The Making Of the “Oh No!!!” by Derek Johnston

The Making Of the “Oh No!!!” by Derek Johnston | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Our new guest Derek Johnston continues our Making Of segment with a documented process of the creation of his fun “Oh No!!!” image. I am always inspired by the BTS stories and projects when an artist has a complete idea of the final result in mind and regardless of perceived restrictions and...
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Speed Art Compositing - Alfa Romeo - YouTube

Iphone 4S Photoshop CS 5.5 Wacom Bamboo Music: ProScores, Video Copilot All photos © Joakim Jalin 2012 Check out my portfolio and more speed art at www.joaki...
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Photoshop: Realistic Tears - YouTube

In this tutorial, I'll show you how create realistic tears in Photoshop CS5. You could also buy some pepper spray and spray their face. Facebook: http://goo....
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I had no idea you could do this with the layers on Screen mode! (1'40")

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Coloring MAKE - Musicbed Doc - with John Carrington

Coloring MAKE - Musicbed Doc - with John Carrington | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Today I get to share with you guys an interview that I am incredibly
excited about. As many of you already know, Musicbed recently blew up the
internet with the release of their new documentary MAKE, and if you haven't
seen it yet you definitely should. 

John Carrington and I have been internet friends for quite some time it
seems, and within the last couple weeks he seemed to pop up EVERYWHERE as a
colorist on some cool projects - Five Star by Ryan Booth, Onward by Cale
Glendening, and MAKE by Musicbed. John was kind enough to take the time to
share some insights into working as a Colorist and specifically some
insight into the process of grading MAKE. We've periodically added
before/after sliders so you can see the frames from the film in their
original state and after he did his magic!

Who are you?
I’m John Carrington and I am a Cinematographer & Colorist based out of
Greenville, SC. 

How did you get into the production world?
My background is that I was a musician and was playing in bands all through
high school and college. When I was younger I was really into audio
engineering and actually went to college for it for a while. I started
working for a church doing all sorts of live production from audio to
lighting and camera systems. One day they said they wanted to do a produced
video and I asked “who’s going to do it?” and their response was that I was
haha. So that was my introduction into video and film. I had always really
loved movies, and had the passing thought “I would really love to work on
films someday.” But I figured it was pretty inaccessible for me because I’m
from the MidWest and didn’t know where to even begin. But I really loved
getting to work on videos and eventually got better. I was really really
bad in the beginning. I’ve always been pretty good at teaching myself
things, I taught myself how to play the guitar and piano, I taught myself
how to record music, and then I taught myself how to do videos and film.
When I really enjoy something I tend to just throw myself into it and
really learn as much about it as possible.

What led you to working as a Colorist?
In the early days, I kind of stumbled upon some blog posts about color
grading and it was also around the time that Apple had released Color with
their FCP Suite. In all honestly, I realized that playing with the color of
my footage made it look like I was way better than I was haha. I just
really fell in love with being able to manipulate footage and make it look
as good as possible.

My first actual job as a colorist was for my good friend and (now) longtime
collaborator Cale Glendening. I had helped him shoot a big music video
project in Oklahoma and the person that was going to do the color ended up
having to back out. Cale knew that I had been doing some grading so he came
to me and asked if I’d be interested in doing the film. I was actually
pretty nervous because it was a big project, I didn’t know if I’d be able
to do it well, and it was 10 music videos with about 45 min of content.
Cale was really encouraging and said “I really think you will do great, you
have my full confidence” and so I just jumped in. That was really the first
job I didn't shoot that I did color on. Cale and I still work together
pretty closely and he is one of my favorite people. That led to me shooting
more and grading my own stuff and more people saw some of the work and
started asking me to grade their stuff. I’ve been really lucky to be able
to work with so many really great Directors and DPs as their colorist. I
really enjoy helping to bring someones vision to life and also learn from
them how they see things.

How did you get connected to do Make?
I had been friends with the guys at Musicbed for a while - I knew Ezra
Cohen & Ben Joyner before they had ever worked there - but I’d never worked
on anything with Musicbed before. Then one day last September I was on a
set and Ezra sent me a text asking if I was interested in doing the grade
for a feature doc they were working on. I asked a few quick questions about
it and it seemed like something I’d be really into. I had a look at the
rough cut they had at the time and after I watched it I knew I just had to
be a part of what they were doing. I jumped on a phone call with Christian
Schultz (Director) and Ezra (Producer) to talk a little about my thoughts
on the film and where I felt like the color should go and I was able to ask
them what they were feeling. We seemed like we were on the same page so we
set up a timeline to work on it and I got connected with the awesome Lucas
J. Harger (Editor). Then we got to work.

What was the relationship like between you, Christian, and Ryan(DP)? Was
anyone else heavily involved?
Christian and I had a few conversations at the beginning of the project to
make sure we were on the same page. On my first pass he really had one
small note overall. For the most part I communicated with Ezra Cohen as we
went back and forth on stuff. I actually didn’t talk to Ryan at all on this
project haha. But everything was smooth sailing because of the discussions
we had at the beginning so I feel like we really just talked about little
things as we went forward. Plus, talking to one person instead of 5-6 makes
communication really easy and clear. Hats off to Ezra, he was juggling a
lot of different things during post but I always felt like I was getting
good info on how things were looking and feeling and even though it took a
while to finish, I think that the team did a good job managing everything.

What were the inspirations and references for the grade on Make?
So this is the rare project where I didn’t have any reference images. When
Christian and I spoke we talked about how we wanted it to feel and what the
overall aesthetic would be. After watching the doc before starting on the
color I really had a strong feeling as to what the tone should be and how
to get there. I pitched it to Christian and he was on board. So I just
jumped in and started grading without really looking at other images. My
favorite director is David Fincher and I just love the looks of his films.
Even though I didn’t directly use any images from his films i think thats
something that really informs my sensibilities and how I personally like
images to feel. But it was a conscious decision to make the film feel like
its own instead of point directly to any actual reference.

What was your Data workflow? Everything was pretty much Dragon right? Did
they ship you drives and then XMLs etc?They shot 90% of the film on the Red
Epic Dragon with RedGamma2/DragonColor. There are probably 3-4 shots that
are a Canon C500 and then another 4-5 shots that are a Canon 5DkIII. Those
shots weren’t the easiest to match, hopefully no one notices which is which
haha. But having a consistent camera for the vast majority of it definitely
helps things to feel the same. I actually just finished working on another
project with Ryan Booth - a doc called ‘Five Star’ - which was shot on 6-7
different camera systems. It was pretty difficult to make all of them feel
the same. 

So I got 2x 8TB drives sent to me from Lucas and started combing through
footage before the edit was 100% locked, just to get a feel for everything
and try and pinpoint some of the more challenging shots and sequences.
Lucas and I then talked about how best to conform the footage. Since the
film is broken down into chapters we decided to break each section into a
reel for the XMLs, so I had 5 XML’s sent to me from Lucas. There were 5
sections, The opening scene/intro was Reel 1, Section 1 was Reel 2, Section
2 was reel 3….ect.

I imported each one into Davinci Resolve and checked it with the master
edit that Lucas provided me. This really helped to make sure everything was
conformed right and I could easily see what clips might not be correct and
fix them. Conforming projects almost always takes more time than you think
it will, especially on big projects, but this one went pretty smoothly.
Another thing we had to do was deal with a number of shots that are from
our character’s projects. In order to make sure that everything was
perfect, Lucas provided me a flat ProRes HQ file that I imported and cut up
myself instead of trying to relink to the source files for that, we were
just having a little trouble getting them to conform perfectly and decided
to work smarter and not harder to make sure everything was perfect from
Lucas’s edit. There are actually 6-7 VFX shots in the film and so I also
had to get those clips to the VFX artist and make sure that everything
matched when we brought the clips back in.

Then I just got to grading and we we eventually got it finished! We used
Frame.IO for the project management and notes, which was really really
great. In the end, I exported a ProRes 4444 Master and also a version with
handles just in case there were some really small tweaks that needed to
happen. I sent the drives back to Lucas and he took my grades and synced
them with the audio provided by DeFacto and also all the graphics and
titles in the film.

What was your process like for the actual grade?
When I first watched Make the world ‘tone' kept coming to mind for the
color. I wanted the film to have a lot of tone, not in a saturated way, but
just have a feel to it that gave the characters a certain richness.
Christian said specifically they like dark, dirty, and gritty and I really
took that to heart when approaching the look. These characters are talking
about why they do what they do and how they see things. Sometimes thats not
perfect and clear so I thought the grade should reflect that theme. I also
wasn’t so concerned with having everything look exactly the same, I felt
each character could kind of have their own space and feel to it, because
each of these people have their own experiences and opinions. So I just
really wanted the grade to reflect each person’s personality and feel.
Obviously you don’t want that to be jarring, the scenes live together so
you do have to try and keep it in the same look family. Ryan did a great
job shooting so there weren't a ton of things that had to be ‘fixed’. It
was more about just finding the right tone. First I switched the clips from
RedGamma2 to RedLogFilm to give me the most flexibility. I then applied a
custom LUT that I developed myself to use for this project. I have a node
pre-LUT for the general matching of clips and any other Pre-LUT adjustments
I needed to make, this makes it easy to keep things feeling the same
throughout the film while also giving you a lot of flexibility to match
shots when needed. Then post-LUT I brought the saturation up and tried to
make sure my black levels were consistent and for the last LUT I had
FilmConvert that was really for grain when needed. They shot the film at
2000 ISO with the FLUT adjustment down 2 stops, this allows for great
highlight retention in the Dragon. There were times that I would bring the
FLUT back to 0 to get a little more exposure and since we weren’t afraid of
grain I could just let it play.

I didn’t use a lot of power windows and qualifiers. I find that when you do
a lot of detail work like that it can come across too slick which I
definitely wanted to stay away from. I did what was necessary to fix
problems like bad color casts, making sure skin tones looked good, and
every once in a  while bring up a part of a scene. It was pretty straight
forward and there really weren’t many notes. Overall everyone was pretty
happy and would just point out really small things here and there. On a big
project like this you just have to take it a bit at a time until you get to
the end. Breaking the film into Reels really helped me to take it a section
at a time and then bring the reels together to get a good overall sense of
how things were feeling. The whole process was really quite smooth and I am
really happy with how it turned out.

Did you have to re-grade any existing footage like the sessions or music
videos to match the feel of everything else?
We did some really small things, definitely nothing major because those
projects already look so great. Some of the BTS stuff got a little bit of
work done on them but we wanted all the existing footage to stay true to
what it is.

What were the biggest struggles with the process?
Honestly, this project went pretty smooth from a color standpoint, and once
again I think thats because we were on the same page at the beginning. I
think one struggle was how long it took to finish. I got the drives in
December 2015 and I think I sent them back to Lucas around April 2016.
Obviously I didn’t work on it for 4 months straight but I think Musicbed
were really trying to decided where the doc would play and in what capacity
so there were times I would wait a decent while on feedback - which isn’t a
big deal - but we were definitely excited to see it finished and share it
with people so having it take a while to finish up was kind of difficult.
But again, Kudos to Ezra for running the ship and making sure everything
got done and we hit the deadlines we set, even if those deadlines would
move around from time to time.

What’s your favorite shot?
I think its funny that its my favorite shot, but I really have always loved
the interview shot with Drake Margolnick in the car. This is a great
example of what i love about Ryan’s cinematography. Its a bold choice to
have him so dark but I feel like it lends itself perfectly to what he is
saying and the mood of the film.
I totally agree - That scene was one of the scenes that really stuck out to
me.

What are three practical things for people to keep in mind with their
grades?
1. Have a strong idea of what you want. I get clients sometimes that want
me to grade for them and they don’t have a clear idea of what they want. I
tend to have a tougher time getting something they are happy with than
people who have a strong visual sense of what they are looking for. It also
just makes the project stronger to have that strong vision. If you don’t
know what you want then just put a little time to really think about how
you see the finished product, then write it down to keep yourself
accountable to the vision you have.

2. Don’t be afraid to push an image farther than you think it can go.
Especially with todays cameras, you can do so many things with your image.
I think people will be surprised to know how far I go with things
sometimes, specifically I’m thinking of things like grain, darkness,
contrast. But if you nail the aesthetic of the piece, your audience will
never know that its a pushed image because they are engaged with the
content and it won’t feel out of place.

3. Be open to ideas that aren’t yours. On this project I got to do pretty
much what I wanted and had a lot of support from the production to take
things in the direction I felt it needed to go, which was awesome. Thats
not always the case. A lot of times what you would naturally do with an
image is at odds with what the client wants. But you will often see that
see the ideas they have really are best for the project. We all see things
differently and a Colorist’s job is to make the director's or DP’s vision
come to life. Be open handed with what you think is best and I think you’ll
be surprised how you are pushed to try new things and discover new and
better ways to approach projects.

I think that's a good note to end on. Thanks for taking the time to share
John! Where can people find you on the internet?
Twitter: @JCarrington3
Insta: @JCarrington3
Web: www.johncarrington.co
Vimeo: www.vimeo.com/JohnCarrington3

Thanks for visiting ebourcier.com - if you want more info on the business
of production you can also visit my Patreon and Youtube Channels!

Seriously. If you haven't seen Make yet, do it. Now.
Vimeo.com/ondemand/make
 
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Taylre Jones Film and Video Colorist

Taylre Jones Film and Video Colorist | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Follow along with colorist Taylre Jones as he reveals insights from his grading process in DaVinci Resolve and before-and-after samples straight from his reel.
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www.rachelkissel.com / Creative Retouching by Rachel Kissel / Exploding Beer!

In this screencast I go over some of the techniques I used to retouch this shot of an exploding beer bottle by Kevin Twomey.
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Making of

Making of | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
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EXIF
Photography: Meca Studio
Camera: Sinarback eVolution 75, Sinar p3 / f3 | Lenses: Sinaron Digital macro 5.6/120 CMV

Sobre mim:
Especialista em manipulação e pós-produção de imagem para publicação.
Adobe Certified Expert e membro da NAPP (National Association Photoshop Professional).
Portfolio: lucasrosa.com
Facebook: facebook.com/LRRetouch
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Jupiter Rising - Adobe Photoshop CC Manipulation - By Flew - YouTube

Idea: The idea was to represent the creation of god of sky and thunder in Roman mythology. Therefore the scene you see is...... in my head the moment he went...
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Learn How to Cutout & Retouch a Product Image in Adobe Photoshop | Dansky - YouTube

In this tutorial, we're going to learn how to cut out a product image on to a coloured background in Adobe Photoshop. PART 2 https://goo.gl/XIryr4 LEARN | Ad...
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Overlay layer - VirtualRig™ Studio 3.0

Add a transparent overlay layer with the car and see the pre-final composition directly in VirtualRig Studio. This layer also guides you when creating blur vectors…
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Getting Rid of Over-Saturated Reds In Skin Tones Using Photoshop | Fstoppers

Getting Rid of Over-Saturated Reds In Skin Tones Using Photoshop | Fstoppers | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Getting perfect skin tones can be quite time consuming and difficult. Because everyone's skin complexion is different, the corrections needed will be different every time. Even so, there are some recurring problems such as over-saturated reds in darker tones. A great makeup goes a long way in helping with redness, but sometimes it is not enough. The best example is the red seen in the ears when the model is backlit. Because of the nature of skin and the human body, the ears are going to turn red and no makeup will totally solve that. So let’s see how we can correct that very effectively and quickly using Photoshop.
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Frequency Separation Rehab | Fstoppers

Frequency Separation Rehab | Fstoppers | Photo Retouching Techniques | Scoop.it
Although there have been countless articles written on the subject of Frequency Separation - including several here on Fstoppers - the current state of retouching has me somewhat concerned about its use. Its widespread adoption, use and overuse has brought us to the point where frequency separation is fast becoming the number one culprit for poorly retouched and cringe worthy work. While I’m not convinced that we need to ban it outright, I do feel that the way we approach it needs to fundamentally change.
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Photo Manipulation - Photoshop | Gravity by Jack Usephot - YouTube

Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JackUsephot Follow me on Instagram: https://instagram.com/Jackusephot High Resolution: http://www.jackusephot...
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