Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale
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Phosphite - What's all the fuzz about? - Pitchcare (press release)

Phosphite - What's all the fuzz about? - Pitchcare (press release) | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it
Pitchcare (press release)
Phosphite - What's all the fuzz about?
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Potential new fertiliser, transgenic crop plants able to utilize phosphite

Potential new fertiliser,  transgenic crop plants able to utilize phosphite | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it

This month’s winner in the ‘so simple it’s positively brilliant (but why did nobody think of it before?)’ category is Damar López-Arredondo and Luis Herrera-Estrella’s paper entitled, ‘Engineering ...

 ...in summary, ‘the production of transgenic crop plants able to utilize phosphite, together with the application of phosphite as a source of phosphorus, might potentially become an effective phosphorus-fertilization and weed control scheme in the almost 67% of cultivated land with low ortho­phosphate availability’.

Whilst the authors are appropriately – and understandably – cautious about the significance of the results and how well they will scale-up to field-sized trials, this work – from the country whose CIMMYT (The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center) was a major player in the Green Revolution of the last century – sounds like another agronomic development with tremendous potential. ¡Muchas gracias!


Via diana buja
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Nature Biotech: Engineering phosphorus metabolism in plants to produce a dual fertilization and weed control system

Nature Biotech: Engineering phosphorus metabolism in plants to produce a dual fertilization and weed control system | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it

Clever! Plants engineered to use phosphite as a sole phosphorus source - they require less phosphorous than when fertilized by orthophosphate, and they outcompete weeds, which can't use phosphite! Nice study, big implications! ($)


Via Mary Williams, Ali Taheri
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Fusarium Patch Plan of Attack | Pender Harbour Greenkeeper

Well we are hardly through the summer but I am already starting to make my plan of attack for the coming fusarium patch (microdochium nivale) season. ...
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Suppression of Microdochium nivale by Phosphite in amenity ...

Suppression of Microdochium nivale by Phosphite in amenity ... | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it
Suppression of Microdochium nivale by Phosphite in amenity Turfgrasses. Suppression of Microdochium nivale by Phosphite in amenity Turfgrasses Presentation for the HLS annual research forum at Uwe, Bristol ...
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PNAS: Plants can use protein as a nitrogen source without assistance from other organisms (2008)

PNAS: Plants can use protein as a nitrogen source without assistance from other organisms (2008) | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it

Nitrogen is quantitatively the most important nutrient that plants acquire from the soil. It is well established that plant roots take up nitrogen compounds of low molecular mass, including ammonium, nitrate, and amino acids. However, in the soil of natural ecosystems, nitrogen occurs predominantly as proteins. This complex organic form of nitrogen is considered to be not directly available to plants. We examined the long-held view that plants depend on specialized symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizas) to access soil protein and studied the woody heathland plant Hakea actites and the herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which do not form mycorrhizas. We show that both species can use protein as a nitrogen source for growth without assistance from other organisms. We identified two mechanisms by which roots access protein. Roots exude proteolytic enzymes that digest protein at the root surface and possibly in the apoplast of the root cortex. Intact protein also was taken up into root cells most likely via endocytosis. These findings change our view of the spectrum of nitrogen sources that plants can access and challenge the current paradigm that plants rely on microbes and soil fauna for the breakdown of organic matter.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Kamoun Lab @ TSL's comment, April 4, 2013 1:34 PM
Highly relevant paper to the root uptake assay debunked by Wawra et al. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/abs/10.1094/MPMI-08-12-0200-R
Brett Tyler's comment, April 26, 2013 7:19 PM
The specific RxLR-dependent uptake of effectors into root tips under discussion at MPMI was always examined using newly formed root tips that lack root hairs. To quote from the Paungfoo-Lonhienne paper scooped here: "Acquisition of intact protein as shown by GFP fluorescence was not observed in newly formed lateral roots that lacked root hairs (data not shown), suggesting that protein uptake depends largely on the presence of root hairs in Hakea and Arabidopsis." Thus this paper is largely irrelevant to the discussion of specific entry, except perhaps to emphasize the importance of the careful controls contained in all the Tyler group's papers published to date, including the latest one in MPMI.
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Nature Biotech: Engineering phosphorus metabolism in plants to produce a dual fertilization and weed control system

Nature Biotech: Engineering phosphorus metabolism in plants to produce a dual fertilization and weed control system | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it

Clever! Plants engineered to use phosphite as a sole phosphorus source - they require less phosphorous than when fertilized by orthophosphate, and they outcompete weeds, which can't use phosphite! Nice study, big implications! ($)


Via Mary Williams, Ali Taheri, John Dempsey
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Rescooped by John Dempsey from learning plant
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Nature Biotech: Engineering phosphorus metabolism in plants to produce a dual fertilization and weed control system

Nature Biotech: Engineering phosphorus metabolism in plants to produce a dual fertilization and weed control system | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it

Clever! Plants engineered to use phosphite as a sole phosphorus source - they require less phosphorous than when fertilized by orthophosphate, and they outcompete weeds, which can't use phosphite! Nice study, big implications! ($)


Via Mary Williams, lei su
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European Turfgrass Society Conference | Turf Diseases

European Turfgrass Society Conference | Turf Diseases | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it
J. Dempsey, I.D. Wilson, P.T.N. Spencer-Phillips and D.L. Arnold; Suppression of Microdochium nivale by Potassium Phosphite in Cool-season Turfgrasses. J. Dempsey; Effect of snow cover on the degradation of the fungicides iprodione and ...
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Doctor Turf: Phosphite for Turf Part 1

Doctor Turf: Phosphite for Turf Part 1 | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it
As a turfgrass scientist, I have been working extremely hard to evaluate the use of phosphite salts (K; Na; or urea – PO33-) to improve turfgrass vigor and as one component to an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy.The approach ...
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PNAS: Plants can use protein as a nitrogen source without assistance from other organisms (2008)

PNAS: Plants can use protein as a nitrogen source without assistance from other organisms (2008) | Phosphite mediated suppression of Microdochium nivale | Scoop.it

Nitrogen is quantitatively the most important nutrient that plants acquire from the soil. It is well established that plant roots take up nitrogen compounds of low molecular mass, including ammonium, nitrate, and amino acids. However, in the soil of natural ecosystems, nitrogen occurs predominantly as proteins. This complex organic form of nitrogen is considered to be not directly available to plants. We examined the long-held view that plants depend on specialized symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizas) to access soil protein and studied the woody heathland plant Hakea actites and the herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which do not form mycorrhizas. We show that both species can use protein as a nitrogen source for growth without assistance from other organisms. We identified two mechanisms by which roots access protein. Roots exude proteolytic enzymes that digest protein at the root surface and possibly in the apoplast of the root cortex. Intact protein also was taken up into root cells most likely via endocytosis. These findings change our view of the spectrum of nitrogen sources that plants can access and challenge the current paradigm that plants rely on microbes and soil fauna for the breakdown of organic matter.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Kamoun Lab @ TSL's comment, April 4, 2013 1:34 PM
Highly relevant paper to the root uptake assay debunked by Wawra et al. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/abs/10.1094/MPMI-08-12-0200-R
Brett Tyler's comment, April 26, 2013 7:19 PM
The specific RxLR-dependent uptake of effectors into root tips under discussion at MPMI was always examined using newly formed root tips that lack root hairs. To quote from the Paungfoo-Lonhienne paper scooped here: "Acquisition of intact protein as shown by GFP fluorescence was not observed in newly formed lateral roots that lacked root hairs (data not shown), suggesting that protein uptake depends largely on the presence of root hairs in Hakea and Arabidopsis." Thus this paper is largely irrelevant to the discussion of specific entry, except perhaps to emphasize the importance of the careful controls contained in all the Tyler group's papers published to date, including the latest one in MPMI.