Phone and Innovation
Follow
Find
4 views | +0 today
Rescooped by Billie Coz from Amazing Science
onto Phone and Innovation
Scoop.it!

Small, Portable Sensors Allow Users to Monitor Exposure to Pollution on Their Smart Phones

Small, Portable Sensors Allow Users to Monitor Exposure to Pollution on Their Smart Phones | Phone and Innovation | Scoop.it

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego have built a small fleet of portable pollution sensors that allow users to monitor air quality in real time on their smart phones. The sensors could be particularly useful to people suffering from chronic conditions, such as asthma, who need to avoid exposure to pollutants.

 

CitiSense is the only air-quality monitoring system capable of delivering real-time data to users’ cell phones and home computers—at any time. Data from the sensors can also be used to estimate air quality throughout the area where the devices are deployed, providing information to everyone—not just those carrying sensors.  

 

Just 100 of the sensors deployed in a fairly large area could generate a wealth of data—well beyond what a small number of EPA-mandated air-quality monitoring stations can provide. For example, San Diego County has 3.1 million residents, 4,000 square miles—and only about 10 stations.

“We want to get more data and better data, which we can provide to the public,” said William Griswold, a computer science professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego and the lead investigator on the project. “We are making the invisible visible.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Billie Coz's insight:

Avoid pollution may save you few years longer

more...
Aletta Verhey's curator insight, September 20, 2013 1:40 PM

Pollution sensors have been created in University Of California in San Diego. This small sensor allows users to monitor exposure to pollution on their phones. CitiSense is the only air quality monitoring system capable of delivering data to peoples' cell phones. The sensors detect ozone, nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide. 

Mallory Wheeler's comment, September 27, 2013 1:33 PM
That phone has swag.
Trenzcape's curator insight, July 5, 7:07 AM

Pollution sensors on smart phones. Smart phones getting smarter day by day...

Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Billie Coz
Scoop.it!

Free Reverse Phone Lookup only at http://phonesearchr.com/

Free Reverse Phone Lookup only at http://phonesearchr.com/ | Phone and Innovation | Scoop.it
Start your free reverse phone number search now. Lookup information on over 500 million cell phone, landline numbers, and area codes in our extensive database.
Billie Coz's insight:

PhoneSearchr a free reverse phone lookup service uses a proprietary search and location feature to find the most current public records available. Each search will return the owner's name, age, address, phone carrier, historical locations and possible relatives.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Billie Coz from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Dirty little smart phones: Ted Smith on the toxins in digital gadgets | GlobalPost.com

Dirty little smart phones: Ted Smith on the toxins in digital gadgets | GlobalPost.com | Phone and Innovation | Scoop.it

Sure, your phone might be smart.

 

But is it clean? Is it safe to use? And were the workers who built it free from harm?

 

Maybe not, says Ted Smith, a longtime Silicon Valley activist.

 

He contends that smart phones and other digital gadgets are among the most hazardous products known to consumers.

 

Smith founded the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition in 1982, after contamination from tech manufacturing in San Jose threatened groundwater. He is coordinator of the International Campaign for Responsible Technology and co-editor of "Challenging the Chip: Labor Rights and Environmental Justice in the Global Electronics Industry." 

 

In 2001, he was honored by the Dalai Lama for his environmental leadership.

 

Click headline to read the interview--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Billie Coz from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Small, Portable Sensors Allow Users to Monitor Exposure to Pollution on Their Smart Phones

Small, Portable Sensors Allow Users to Monitor Exposure to Pollution on Their Smart Phones | Phone and Innovation | Scoop.it

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego have built a small fleet of portable pollution sensors that allow users to monitor air quality in real time on their smart phones. The sensors could be particularly useful to people suffering from chronic conditions, such as asthma, who need to avoid exposure to pollutants.

 

CitiSense is the only air-quality monitoring system capable of delivering real-time data to users’ cell phones and home computers—at any time. Data from the sensors can also be used to estimate air quality throughout the area where the devices are deployed, providing information to everyone—not just those carrying sensors.  

 

Just 100 of the sensors deployed in a fairly large area could generate a wealth of data—well beyond what a small number of EPA-mandated air-quality monitoring stations can provide. For example, San Diego County has 3.1 million residents, 4,000 square miles—and only about 10 stations.

“We want to get more data and better data, which we can provide to the public,” said William Griswold, a computer science professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego and the lead investigator on the project. “We are making the invisible visible.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Billie Coz's insight:

Avoid pollution may save you few years longer

more...
Aletta Verhey's curator insight, September 20, 2013 1:40 PM

Pollution sensors have been created in University Of California in San Diego. This small sensor allows users to monitor exposure to pollution on their phones. CitiSense is the only air quality monitoring system capable of delivering data to peoples' cell phones. The sensors detect ozone, nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide. 

Mallory Wheeler's comment, September 27, 2013 1:33 PM
That phone has swag.
Trenzcape's curator insight, July 5, 7:07 AM

Pollution sensors on smart phones. Smart phones getting smarter day by day...