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Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment

Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it

Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another's presence. Pairs of participants moved their “avatars” along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other's motions, but only one, the other's avatar, also embodied the other's contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other's avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other's presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment.

 

Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment
Tom Froese, Hiroyuki Iizuka & Takashi Ikegami

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 3672 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep03672


Via Complexity Digest, António F Fonseca
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 17, 3:57 AM

More experiments with our social brain.

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The problem with algorithms: magnifying misbehaviour

The problem with algorithms: magnifying misbehaviour | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Computers that learn from and repeat human behaviour save time and money, but what happens when they repeat flawed traits or errors thousands of times per second?

Via NESS, Lorien Pratt
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Lorien Pratt's curator insight, January 13, 2:28 PM

The complexity of business / policy decisions seems to be increasing.  But is that only an illusion?  Here's one reason it's real: automation is magnifiying the speed of our mistakes at the same time it's increasing productivity. 

Rescooped by John Symons from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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Scale-free interpersonal influences on opinions in complex systems

An important side effect of the evolution of the human brain is an increased capacity to form opinions in a very large domain of issues, which become points of aggressive interpersonal disputes. Remarkably, such disputes are often no less vigorous on small differences of opinion than large differences. Opinion differences that may be measured on the real number line may not directly correspond to the subjective importance of an issue and extent of resistance to opinion change. This is a hard problem for field of opinion dynamics, a field that has become increasingly prominent as it has attracted more contributions to it from investigators in the natural and engineering sciences. The paper contributes a scale-free approach to assessing the extents to which individuals, with unknown heterogeneous resistances to influence, have been influenced by the opinions of others.


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Complexity hype discussion

Complexity hype discussion | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
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Interesting gossip/history of complexity science from science journalists John Horgan and George Johnson.  

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22. Emergence and Complexity - YouTube

(May 21, 2010) Professor Robert Sapolsky gives a lecture on emergence and complexity. He details how a small difference at one place in nature can have a hug...
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This is for students in the emergence course.  Please watch this to get a birds-eye view of the scientific enthusiasm for the concept of emergence.  Sapolsky is a wonderful teacher and a brilliant scientist.  Well worth the time to watch the entire thing.

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Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, January 10, 3:55 AM

butiful speaker

 

António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 10, 4:34 AM

A long but very interesting lecture about Emergence and Complexity from Stanford.

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[1401.1236] Structural patterns in complex systems using multidendrograms

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have not yet read this.  Looks interesting though

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Emergent Evolution: Qualitative Novelty and the Levels of Reality by David Blitz

I'm reading on Scribd... #ReadScribd
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This is a really interesting account of British emergentism and biology.  I'm learning a great deal from it.  

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Murray Gell-Mann: The Simple and the Complex (excerpt) -- A Thinking Allowed DVD w/ Jeffrey Mishlove - YouTube

NOTE: This is an excerpt from the two-part, 60-minute DVD. http://www.thinkingallowed.com/2mgellmann.html Nobel laureate Gell-Mann addresses the relationship...
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US Military Scientists Solve the Fundamental Problem of Viral Marketing | MIT Technology Review

US Military Scientists Solve the Fundamental Problem of Viral Marketing  | MIT Technology Review | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Network theorists working for the US military have worked out how to identify the small “seed” group of people who can spread a message across an entire network

Via Spaceweaver, Frédéric Amblard
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 6, 3:08 AM

It was already seaked by other groups, they only got sub-modularity properties defining the scope of greedy algorithm's search, these guys seem to be on the right track.

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Emergence and Identity. G.H Mead 1932

Emergence and Identity.  G.H Mead 1932 | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Classic paper: Emergence and identity E:CO Issue Vol. 9 No. 3 2007 pp. 75-96ClassicalClassic paper section Emergence and identityGeorge Herbert Mead (with an introduction by Jeffrey A.
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Mead is often very obscure. But, for anyone interested in the history of emergentism, there are some very interesting criticisms of Alexander around p. 43 of this.  It's the second chapter of Mead's Philosophy of the Present (1932).  

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Spontaneous recovery in dynamical networks : Nature Physics : Nature Publishing Group

Spontaneous recovery in dynamical networks : Nature Physics : Nature Publishing Group | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Networks that fail can sometimes recover spontaneously[mdash]think of traffic jams suddenly easing or people waking from a coma.

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Computational Modeling | National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Computational Modeling | National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
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Nice overview of what bioengineering folks think computational models are good for.

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Rescooped by John Symons from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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The Heart as a Complex Adaptive System

The Heart as a Complex Adaptive System | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it

There is mounting evidence that the heart is a system onto itself and that it is intimately intertwined with the nervous and endocrine system residing within its borders. The capacity of self-organized systems to adapt is embodied in the functional organization of the intrinsic control mechanisms. How these regulatory subsystems communicate and how uncoupling of the hierarchical organization results in loss of adaptive "fitness"remains a challenge in human biology. The principles by which "emergent properties" and functional order of a self-organizingsystem, such as the heart, achieve (homeo)dynamic stability provide a non-reductionist framework for understanding how biological system adapts to imposed internal and external stresses, e.g., ischemia, organ/tissue transplantation. In particular, the newly emergent dynamics of cardiac rhythm observed after the heart is transplanted may reflect a more stable,versatile and adaptive (as per "law of requisite variety") bipartite whole. The integrative action of the living organism can not be gotten from their concatenated fractions but is evolved "relationally", i.e., it emanates from emergent internal requirements of the constitutive parts.

J. Yasha Kresh, Igor Izrailtyan, Andrew S. Wechsler 
Depts. of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Medicine 
MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine / Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA


Via Bernard Ryefield
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deeply interesting study of the dynamics of the heart.  

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june holley's curator insight, January 7, 8:09 AM

The heart can help us understand self-organization.

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What Happens When You Freeze Water in a Container So Strong the Water Can't Expand Into Ice?

What Happens When You Freeze Water in a Container So Strong the Water Can't Expand Into Ice? | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Kevin asks: What would happen if you froze water, but the container was so strong the water couldn’t expand into ice?
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Flexible Muscle-Based Locomotion for Bipedal Creatures

We present a muscle-based control method for simulated bipeds in which both the muscle routing and control parameters are optimized. This yields a generic locomotion…
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This is great fun.

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Rescooped by John Symons from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
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Generalized friendship paradox in complex networks

The friendship paradox states that your friends have on average more friends than you have. Does the paradox "hold'" for other individual characteristics like income or happiness? To address this question, we generalize the friendship paradox for arbitrary node characteristics in complex networks. By analyzing two coauthorship networks of Physical Review journals and Google Scholar profiles, we find that the generalized friendship paradox (GFP) holds at the individual and network levels for various characteristics, including the number of coauthors, the number of citations, and the number of publications. The origin of the GFP is shown to be rooted in positive correlations between degree and characteristics. As a fruitful application of the GFP, we suggest effective and efficient sampling methods for identifying high characteristic nodes in large-scale networks. Our study on the GFP can shed lights on understanding the interplay between network structure and node characteristics in complex networks.


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António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 13, 4:03 AM

Maybe a good metric to characterize people on social networks, to have more or less friends than the average of their friends.

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IBM Launches $1 Billion Watson Supercomputer Division

IBM Launches $1 Billion Watson Supercomputer Division | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Tech giant IBM announced it will invest one billion dollars in a new Watson-based business unit to promote sales of Watson-powered technologies. The superc
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The uses of infinity: a philosopher looks at emergent phenomena in physics - YouTube

Emergence', and its contrary reduction, are buzz-words in both physics and philosophy. Both physicists and philosophers disagree about the extent to which we...
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Jeremy Butterfield has some interesting things to say about the role of the infinite as a way of reconciling emergence and reduction.

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Cellular Forms

Cellular Forms uses a simplified model of cellular growth to create intricate sculptural shape. Structures are created out of interconnected cells, with rules for…
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Very beautiful visualization of simple rules for interaction of cells.  

ht Hiroki Sayama

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Is our tech making the world too complex? – Samuel Arbesman – Aeon

Is our tech making the world too complex? – Samuel Arbesman – Aeon | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Human ingenuity has created a world that the mind cannot master. Have we finally reached our limits?
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Supercomputers join search for 'cheapium': Brute force computing used to find new materials

Supercomputers join search for 'cheapium': Brute force computing used to find new materials | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Researchers use brute force supercomputing to identify dozens of platinum-group alloys that were previously unknown to science but could prove beneficial in a wide range of applications.
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Michael Pollan: How Smart Are Plants?

Michael Pollan: How Smart Are Plants? | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Depending on whom you talk to, the field of plant neurobiology represents either a radical new paradigm in our understanding of life or a slide down into murky scientific waters.
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New book: “Hypernetworks in the Science of Complex Systems”, by ...

New book: “Hypernetworks in the Science of Complex Systems”, by ... | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
The modern world is complex beyond human understanding and control. The science of complex systems aims to find new ways of thinking about the many interconnected networks of interaction that defy traditional ...
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Jef Johnson's new book is on my must-read list for the new year.  It's good to have an accessible overview of Jeff's important hypernetwork ideas.  

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ComplexInsight's curator insight, December 31, 2013 3:50 AM

One for the reading list for certain.

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With Enough Time, This Installation Will Produce Every Photograph Possible

With Enough Time, This Installation Will Produce Every Photograph Possible | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
In trying to make beauty through brute force Jeff Thompson raises questions about art authorship and even the very nature of existence.
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H/T/ Antonio Fonseca

 

William Poundstone discussed this idea back in the 80s in his excellent popular science book "The Recursive Universe"

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The surprise theory of everything - physics-math - 15 October 2012 - New Scientist

The surprise theory of everything - physics-math - 15 October 2012 - New Scientist | Philosophy and Complexity | Scoop.it
Forget quantum physics, forget relativity. Inklings of an ultimate theory might emerge from an unexpected place, says physicist Vlatko Vedral

Via Ben van Lier
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