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Rescooped by James Micic from Philosophy, Psychology, Art, Communication, Language
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The Philosophy of Creativity

The Philosophy of Creativity | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ This collection of new essays on creativity integrates philosophical insights with empirical research.”
Via Bettina Ascaino
James Micic's insight:
This is really fascinating stuff. "Creativity is primarily an attribute not of products, but of mental processes". But where are Bergson and A. N. Whitehead?
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Rescooped by James Micic from Philosophy, Psychology, Art, Communication, Language
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The best way to win an argument

The best way to win an argument | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ How do you change someone’s mind if you think you are right and they are wrong? Psychology reveals the last thing to do is the tactic we usually resort to. You are, I'm afraid to say, mistaken. The...”
Via Bettina Ascaino
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Rescooped by James Micic from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
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The logic of Buddhist philosophy – Graham Priest – Aeon

The logic of Buddhist philosophy – Graham Priest – Aeon | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
Buddhist philosophy is full of contradictions. Now modern logic is learning why that might be a good thing. - Western philosophers have not, on the whole, regarded Buddhist thought with much enthusiasm. As a colleague once said to me: ‘It’s all just mysticism.’ This attitude is due, in part, to ignorance. But it is also due to incomprehension. When Western philosophers look East, they find things they do not understand – not least the fact that the Asian traditions seem to accept, and even endorse, contradictions. Thus we find the great second-century Buddhist philosopher Nagarjuna saying: The nature of things is to have no nature; it is their non-nature that is their nature. For they have only one nature: no-nature. An abhorrence of contradiction has been high orthodoxy in the West for more than 2,000 years. Statements such as Nagarjuna’s are therefore wont to produce looks of blank incomprehension, or worse. As Avicenna, the father of Medieval Aristotelianism, declared: Anyone who denies the law of non-contradiction should be beaten and burned until he admits that to be beaten is not the same as not to be beaten, and to be burned is not the same as not to be burned. One can hear similar sentiments, expressed with comparable ferocity, in many faculty common rooms today. Yet Western philosophers are slowly learning to outgrow their parochialism. And help is coming from a most unexpected direction: modern mathematical logic, not a field that is renowned for its tolerance of obscurity.
Via Wildcat2030
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Rescooped by James Micic from Ciencia-Física
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Pirulo Cósmico: Hubble Extreme Deep Field, observando los confines del Universo

Pirulo Cósmico: Hubble Extreme Deep Field, observando los confines del Universo | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ Pirulo Cósmico: Hubble Extreme Deep Field, observando los confines del Universo: Después de las famosas fotos de...”
Via Barzanallana
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Rescooped by James Micic from Archivance - Philosophiques
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Gilles Deleuze on Cinema - What is the Creative Act? (1987)

“ This 45 minute talk at a conference in 1987 on the "act of creation" in cinema is perhaps the most intimate capture of Gilles Deleuze on film besides the Abé...”
Via René Z.
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Rescooped by James Micic from Image of the World
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"That Slightest Change of Tone Which Yet Makes All the Difference": Science and Bodily Knowledge in Alfred North Whitehead

"That Slightest Change of Tone Which Yet Makes All the Difference": Science and Bodily Knowledge in Alfred North Whitehead | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ Alfred North Whitehead observes in Modes of Thought: “the current philosophic doctrines, mostly derived from Hume, are defective by reason of their neglect of bodily reference” (153), based explici...”
Via Zeteticus
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Rescooped by James Micic from Philosophy, Psychology, Art, Communication, Language
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Una biblioteca con 10 mil ebooks para descargar en español

Una biblioteca con 10 mil ebooks para descargar en español | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ Eduardo Sandez es un usuario que ha recolectado un gran número de libros en PDF y ePub para compartirlos con todos en la red. De hecho, creó una biblioteca con su nombre en el servicio FileCloud y Drive, el primero contiene 10,000 textos y en el servicio de Google hay 500 obras.”
Via Bettina Ascaino
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36 Unexpected Origins Of Everyday British Phrases

36 Unexpected Origins Of Everyday British Phrases | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“Etymology, my dear Watson.(36 Unexpected Origins Of Everyday British Phrases http://t.co/jTCFlrTA3S #words #language #phrases #lexophilia #linguaphilia #linguistics)...”
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Rescooped by James Micic from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
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From the Archives (2009): David Chalmers and the Singularity that will probably not come

From the Archives (2009): David Chalmers and the Singularity that will probably not come | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“David Chalmers is a philosopher of mind, best known for his argument about the difficulty of what he termed the “hard problem” of consciousness, which he typically discusses by way of a thought experiment featuring zombies who act and talk exactly like humans, and yet have no conscious thought (I explained clearly what I think of that sort of thing in my essay on “The Zombification of Philosophy”).”
Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
James Micic's insight:
An interesting article for both advocates and denouncers of the idea of the singularity.
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Rescooped by James Micic from Philosophy, Psychology, Art, Communication, Language
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21 genius depictions of words without an exact English translation. I always needed a word like #8!

21 genius depictions of words without an exact English translation. I always needed a word like #8! | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ There are some words from other languages that don't have a exact English translation, for example age-otori means "person looks worse after a new haircut" in Japanese, and in Russia a person who a...”
Via Bettina Ascaino
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Rescooped by James Micic from Radical Compassion
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A Mind-Bending Look at the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Photo of the Universe - PetaPixel

A Mind-Bending Look at the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Photo of the Universe - PetaPixel | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ Check out this mind-bending video that talks about the "Hubble Ultra Deep Field" image captured by NASA astronomers nearly a decade ago -- a photograph”
Via Jim Manske
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Jim Manske's curator insight, June 7, 2013 5:31 PM

Share the awe with me!

Jim Manske's comment, June 7, 2013 5:41 PM
An opportunity to connect with Awe...
Rescooped by James Micic from Philosophy, Psychology, Art, Communication, Language
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8 Common Thinking Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day and How to Prevent Them - - The Buffer Blog

8 Common Thinking Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day and How to Prevent Them - - The Buffer Blog | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ What are the biggest thinking mistakes all of us do nearly every day? We've collected the 8 biggest thinking mistakes here today for you:”
Via Bettina Ascaino
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Rescooped by James Micic from Digital Delights
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Deleuze and Guattari, Web Resources

Deleuze and Guattari, Web Resources | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
James Micic's insight:
If you want to know where to go for resources on Deleuze and societies and institutions with interests in Deleuze then this is the place. Although it is a little out of date (last updated in 2011) it is useful all the same.
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Rescooped by James Micic from Gilles Deleuze
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Lectures by Gilles Deleuze: Theory of Multiplicities in Bergson

Lectures by Gilles Deleuze: Theory of Multiplicities in Bergson | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
... I wanted to propose to you an investigation [recherche] into the history of a word, a still very partial, very localized history. That word is “multiplicity.” There is a very current use of multiplicity: for example, I say: a multiplicity of numbers, a multiplicity of acts, a multiplicity of states of consciousness, a multiplicity of shocks [ébranlements]. Here “multiplicity” is employed as a barely nominalized adjective. And it's true that Bergson often expressed himself thus. But at other times, the word “multiplicity” is employed in the strong sense, as a true substantive, thus, from the second chapter of Time and Free Will onward, the number is a multiplicity, which does not mean the same thing at all as a multiplicity of numbers. Why do we feel that this use of multiplicity, as a substantive, is at once unusual and important? (The concept of multiplicity, Time and Free Will 224-26) It's because, so long as we employ the adjective multiple, we only think a predicate that we necessarily place in a relation of opposition and complementarity with the predicate ONE: the one and the multiple, the thing is one or multiple, and it's even one and multiple. On the contrary, when we employ the substantive multiplicity, we already indicate thereby that we have surpassed [dépassé] the opposition of predicates one/multiple, that we are already set up on a completely different terrain, and on this terrain we are necessarily led to distinguish types of multiplicity. In other words, the very notion of multiplicity taken as a substantive implies a displacement of all of thought: for the dialectical opposition of the one and the multiple, we substitute the typological difference between multiplicities. And this is exactly what Bergson does: throughout all his work he continually denounces the dialectic as an abstract thought, as a false movement that goes from one opposite to the other, from the one to the multiple and from the same to the one, but which thus always lets the essence of the thing escape, that is the how many, the poson [Greek term for “how much”]. That's why in chapter three of Creative Evolution he will reject the question: is élan vital one or multiple? For élan vital is like duration, it's neither one nor multiple, it's a type of multiplicity. Even further: the predicates one and multiple depend upon the notion of multiplicity, and only agree precisely with the other type of multiplicity, that is to say with the multiplicity that is distinguished from that of duration or élan vital: “Abstract unity and abstract multiplicity are determinations of space or categories of the understanding” (Creative Evolution 280-81)...
Via Vincent DUBOIS
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Rescooped by James Micic from Cognitive Science - Artificial Intelligence
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The Miracle and Mystery of Sleep: 12 Remarkable Psychological Studies — PsyBlog

The Miracle and Mystery of Sleep: 12 Remarkable Psychological Studies — PsyBlog | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
“ “Sleeping is no mean art: for its sake one must stay awake all day.” ~Friedrich Nietzsche”
Via Bernard Ryefield
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Rescooped by James Micic from Examining Philosophy
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Why Darwinist Materialism is Wrong

Why Darwinist Materialism is Wrong | Philosophy and Language | Scoop.it
An atheist philosopher's new book wages a powerful assault on materialist naturalism. (RT @DrJohnFrame: "Why Darwinist Materialism is Wrong": Alvin Plantinga's review of Thomas Nagel's Mind and Cosmos.
Via Kelly Fitzsimmons Burton
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