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Ball boy Joe Davey, 14, is heading for the stars

Ball boy Joe Davey, 14, is heading for the stars | Phillippo | Scoop.it
A young sports fan is a step closer to his dream of becoming a ball kid for tennis superstars.
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World's first real 3D-printed gun fires more than 50 rounds

World's first real 3D-printed gun fires more than 50 rounds | Phillippo | Scoop.it
In a breakthrough for 3D-printing technology, the world's first working metal gun has been created (http://t.co/SBUz089fcv)

Via TechinBiz
JAMIEWHITTLE's insight:

bad for peoples health if  they get shot by one

 

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Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:05 AM

o Mundo à solta?

optionsciencepo's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:34 AM

Pierre Raphael technologie

 

Everett Dalton's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:05 AM

wow that looks like something off men in black..lol

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Everett Dalton, IBO

http://www.wakeup2mca.com

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Technology transforming the leisure world - CNN.com

Technology transforming the leisure world - CNN.com | Phillippo | Scoop.it
Technology makes it easier to get what we want, when we want it, while remaining entirely alone
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Can Mobile Health Technologies Transform Health Care?

Can Mobile Health Technologies Transform Health Care? | Phillippo | Scoop.it

There is substantial enthusiasm for the concept of mobile health (mHealth), a broad term typically used to describe the use of mobile telecommunication technologies for the delivery of health care and in support of wellness. In 2011, US Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius referred to mHealth as “the biggest technology breakthrough of our time” and maintained that its use would “address our greatest national challenge.


This level of exuberance for mHealth is driven by the convergence of 3 powerful forces. First is the unsustainability of current health care spending and the recognition of the need for disruptive solutions. Second is the rapid and ongoing growth in wireless connectivity—there now are more than 3.2 billion unique mobile users worldwide—and the remarkable capability this brings for the bidirectional instantaneous transfer of information. Third is the need for more precise and individualized medicine; a refinement in phenotypes that mandates novel, personal data streams well beyond the occasional vital sign or laboratory data available through intermittent clinic visits.


mHealth could benefit ambulatory individuals in 2 general ways: (1) allow them to more easily and reliably self-diagnose their acute symptoms, and (2) enhance monitoring, tracking, and communication of various biometric information (eg, blood pressure, glucose levels, spirometry values, oxygen saturation) for individuals with chronic medical conditions, enabling greater engagement and partnership in their care. 


mHealth technologies have the potential to change every aspect of the health care environment and to do so while delivering better outcomes and substantially lowering costs. For consumers, mHealth offers the promise of improved convenience, more active engagement in their care, and greater personalization. For clinicians, mHealth could lead to reduced demands on their time and permit them to instead refocus on the art of medicine. Much remains to be done to drive this transformation. Most critically needed is real-world clinical trial evidence to provide a roadmap for implementation that confirms its benefits to consumers, clinicians, and payers alike.

 

 


For more see the original : http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleID=1762473


Via nrip
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