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Are Physicians Really Technology Averse?

Are Physicians Really Technology Averse? | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it

One unexpected consequence of the HITECH Act is the emergence of a physician stereotype – a doctor who favors paper records over software, a provider who can’t manage online scheduling and instead remains committed to scheduling appointments over the phone.

But does this popular narrative contain any truth? Yes, the transition to electronic medical records remains uneasy, but the begrudging acceptance or even downright rejection of one piece of technology shouldn’t paint an entire nation of physicians as techno-phobes.

Has the digitization of patient records revealed a hole in the tools physicians use to treat patients? Are expectations for a physician’s use of technology simply overblown, or is there a misrepresentation of how physicians use technology?

Where Expectations Come From

RAND’s estimation of annual benefits from inpatient CPOE

Several sources feed the demand for more technologically savvy doctors. Chief among these is the absurdly complex process of obtaining and transferring patient records in paper form. If you ask your primary care physician for your files, she’ll have to print them for you – perhaps even at a cost. Now you’re tasked with carrying around a manila envelope – or depending on your personal condition, a huge MRI scan – to every specialist you go to.

Frankly, we’re light years past this point as consumers, and the previous example assumes a scenario of relative simplicity. Consider if you had to travel to multiple providers to build a somewhat comprehensible patient record. Perhaps you’ve moved out of state and the only provider with your records is hundreds of miles away.

Beyond the needless complexity for paper records for patients, there’s also the matter of how US healthcare costs stack up against the rest of the world. It’s no secret that the US healthcare system is expensive, and in some cases inefficient.

Other nations have utilized technology systems like EHRs for years, and while different delivery models account for much of the inefficiency in the US, the theoretical position of technology as a cost reducer is a strong one.

So, the demand for better technology in healthcare is being driven by the dual forces of changing consumer demand for convenience and government demand for efficiency.

How Physicians Really Use Technology

Needless to say, transition in a system as complex as healthcare isn’t easy, especially given the movement of healthcare providers from mostly independently owned operations to vast networks.

But can the unwieldy nature of this transition be laid at the feet of physicians? Is their xenophobia to technology holding back the progress of an entire industry?

It seems doubtful.

In hopes of discovering a more realistic picture of the American physician’s technology habits, let’s examine some recent findings.

Business Technology

 

In terms of technology directly related to the business functions of running a practice, hospital, or surgery center, physicians are mostly on board. In 2013, ZocDoc conducted a survey and found that 74 percent of physicians use practice management software in their office, 63 percent allow patients to fill out forms online, and 62 percent have sent prescriptions to patients electronically.

The sample size for this study was somewhat small at 360, but the overall trend shows that many physicians are using technology for scheduling, financials, and even prescription communication. It’s logical that these areas have experienced significant adoption, because they help increase business efficiency.

And electronic medical records? Well, that number stands somewhere between SK&A’s estimated 63 percent and the National Center for Health Care Statistics 78 percent. Either way, the number is high, but satisfaction is still middling, and certain functionality remains limited.

Business technologies deal mainly with the consumer convenience and cost savings mentioned earlier. Ideally, if care coordination can be improved through technology, patients will be able to move between providers easily without being subjected to redundant tests or wrong procedures – both of which increase costs and decrease quality.

The Web

What Physicians Search For Online

Moving away from the esoteric technologies of practice management and EHRs, examining how physicians use the internet in clinical practice can be fascinating. The expanding body of modern medical research has made it impossible for any physician to simply remember every best practice or consultation.

So do physicians dust off the old text books and comb through pages upon pages of medical research? Hardly. In 2009, a Google-commissioned survey by Hall & Partners sought to find out how physicians used the web to supplement their clinical habits.

The results? Some 86 percent of American physicians use the internet to gather health, clinical, or prescription information. A Manhattan Research survey earlier in the year put the number closer to 92 percent. Of course, the researchers were quick to point out that no evidence existed to suggest that physicians made decisions solely based on the information they gathered online.

Regardless, it’s clear that accessing massive archives of evidence-based medicine has never been easier, and U.S. doctors aren’t hesitant to search for clinical information online in hopes of better treating their patients.

Mobile

And speaking of using tools to find relevant information, U.S. physicians also display a healthy use of mobile technology to perform their daily job functions. Epocrates, the most popular mobile app for clinical use, is estimated to be used by around 70 percent of physicians. This application enables providers to search for best practices and other clinical information in a database maintained by vetted, certified physicians.

Further, it’s estimated that around 80 percent of physicians use a mobile device during work hoursfor clinical purposes. And for access to an EHR? One study found 100 percent of physician respondents who were searching for an EHR said mobile accessibility was a must have. Manhattan Research also reports that 72 percent of physicians have adopted tablet computers.

So it doesn’t appear physicians have a problem integrating their mobile devices in clinical practice.

Social Media

 

 

Zocdoc’s survey also found that 87 percent of physicians under 56 use social media on an individual basis, whether simply in their personal lives or to engage patients by offering medical advice. This number is high, and likely reflects heavy use in a non-professional setting.

When the presence of a provider’s practice was measured on social media, the results were much lower: Facebook was the only medium to report higher than 40 percent. And while having doctors use their personal social media profiles to disseminate reliable advice is important, a practice profile probably receives much higher interact from patients. This signals an area in need of improvement, especially considering that so many consumers use social media as means to reach customer service, including medical.

 

 Squandered Possibilities or Simply a Diffusion Curve?                          

So in nearly every other aspect except EHR use, it seems physicians are above average users of technology. Do opportunities still exist? Of course. E-consultations offer a fascinating avenue for lowering the cost of an office visit and increasing access for rural areas, and integrating remote monitoring systems such as Apple’s healthkit offer a great way to manage chronic illness.

Further, concierge physicians who have reverted to making house calls in order to cut out the bureaucracy of owning an office building and running practice offer patients a compelling, personalized alternative to the way medicine is normally delivered.

Care coordination could always improve as well, even at a hospital level. However, it seems most physicians are attempting to use most of the technological tools are their disposal. Naturally, higher technology use is correlated with younger physician demographics, and doctors, like other technology users, will always be more apt to use systems that offer them an intuitive experience.

But neither of these caveats signals a technology aversion by American doctors. The reality appears to be quite the opposite.

 


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L'utilisation du Cloud en forte progression dans les entreprises françaises

L'utilisation du Cloud en forte progression dans les entreprises françaises | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Pas moins de 26 % ! c'est la croissance de l'utilisation du Cloud en France sur les six derniers mois selon PAC (Pierre Audoin Consultants)

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Comment les marques utilisent Instagram : 8 exemples de réussite

Comment les marques utilisent Instagram : 8 exemples de réussite | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Alors que le réseau social de photos Instagram vient de dépasser Twitter en nombre d'utilisateurs, LSA vous propose un classement (subjectif) des meilleurs comptes de marques. 

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It's Official: The Internet Of Things Takes Over Big Data As The Most Hyped Technology

It's Official: The Internet Of Things Takes Over Big Data As The Most Hyped Technology | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Gartner released last week its latest Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies. Last year, big data reigned supreme, at what Gartner calls the “peak of inflated expectations.”  But now big data has moved down the “trough of disillusionment,” replaced by the Internet of Things at the top of the hype cycle. [...]
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Top Ten Big Data Trends in Finance

Check out how big data is proving invaluable to finance. Here is the top 10 big data trends in finance. Big data place a vital role in analysing the feeds, Pre…

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Athanasios Triantafyllakis's curator insight, October 15, 2014 8:12 AM

Check how Big Data rule the Finance industry

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Inbound Marketing: the power of content curation

Inbound Marketing: the power of content curation | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Inbound marketing is efficient and its lifeblood is content. So how can you scale it with ROI to generate more business?
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4 Reasons for Retailers to Embrace Online Scheduling tools | Agendize Blog

4 Reasons for Retailers to Embrace Online Scheduling tools | Agendize Blog | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Find out why Online Scheduling tools are vital in maximizing traffic and generating sales for brick-and-mortar retailers.
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Online Scheduler Reviews – What is the best online scheduler?

Online Scheduler Reviews – What is the best online scheduler? | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Scheduling meetings and appointments often consists of several back-and-forth email exchanges or pho...
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La prise de rendez-vous un outil web-to-store qui se développe dans de nbx secteurs

La prise de rendez-vous un outil web-to-store qui se développe dans de nbx secteurs | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it

Une récente étude de Capgemini Consulting sur le webtostore (consulter l’étude), mettait en avant deux services indispensables à mettre en place dans sa stratégie digitale pour favoriser la vente en magasin. Il s’agissait des listes d’achat (« Online Shopping List services ») et des services de prise de rendez-vous (« Appointment Booking »).

L’étude pointait également du doigt le retard des pays européens par rapport aux Etats-Unis dans la mise en place de ces fonctionnalités, contrairement à des fonctionnalités plus « basiques » telles que le Store Locator (voir mon article sur le sujet).

- See more at: http://monclientdigital.fr/quels-usages-pour-la-prise-de-rendez-vous-sur-votre-site-internet/#sthash.jN7FanuE.dpuf


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New Year’s Resolutions for Online Retailers: e-Spirit’s Tips for Good Content Marketing in 2014

New Year’s Resolutions for Online Retailers: e-Spirit’s Tips for Good Content Marketing in 2014 | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Less chocolate and more exercise are typical New Year’s resolutions for most of us. In the world of e-commerce, Web Content Management (WCM) provider e-Spirit advises online retailers to prepare for their 2014 resolutions now.

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97% of SMBs say security positively impacted by cloud adoption

97% of SMBs say security positively impacted by cloud adoption | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Over 95% of respondents in a comScore survey of French SMBs said cloud adoption had a positive impact on security, as well as noticing unexpected benefits, such as up-to-date systems and antivirus protection.
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CRM, RH, achats : le Cloud est l’offre par défaut de SAP

CRM, RH, achats : le Cloud est l’offre par défaut de SAP | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Le président de SAP Europe détaille la récente restructuration de la société, qui voit le Cloud devenir l’offre par défaut dans le CRM, la RH et les achats.

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Prisma va lancer une version française de la « Harvard Business Review »

Prisma va lancer une version française de la « Harvard Business Review » | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Après un test réussi en avril, Prisma Media lancera la revue sur une base régulière d'ici à début 2014. Sorti le...
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Le Click and Collect : usages, attentes & opinions … #drive #web2store #clickncollect

Le Click and Collect : usages, attentes & opinions … #drive #web2store #clickncollect | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it

Une étude riche d’informations qui délivre de nombreuses données sur :

Les usages en matière de retrait des colis en point de vente de l’enseigneL’impact sur l’activité commerciale des magasins suivant les principaux secteurs d’activitéLes attentes des consommateurs pour améliorer l’expérience du retrait de colis en point de vente
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Mais finalement, c'est quoi un blog ?

Mais finalement, c'est quoi un blog ? | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Lundi dernier j'ai eu la joie d'intervenir pour la seconde année devant les étudiants de la licence professionnelle COMEN de l'IUT de Dijon, pour leur parler de mon activité de blogueur, mon organisation, mon utilisation des médias sociaux.

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Social Business Is Dead . . . | MIT Sloan Management Review

Social Business Is Dead . . . | MIT Sloan Management Review | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Social media has changed business practice dramatically — but now the very nature of social business is itself transforming.
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Now mobile analytics startups are hiring data scientists. Here's why

Now mobile analytics startups are hiring data scientists. Here's why | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Getting that data, and understanding it, is pretty meaningful,” he said

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Athanasios Triantafyllakis's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:46 AM

Analytics and profiling are important for today's competitive business world. Big Data and Data Science are here to help!

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It's time for the next wave of healthcare analytics startups

It's time for the next wave of healthcare analytics startups | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it

“Big data” and analytics applied to healthcare is a hot area of investment. This year alone, roughly $200 million of venture capital dollars has been allocated to the space (according to Rock Health). I’m here to tell you that these glory days are gone.

New startups are finding it difficult to differentiate from the swath of other companies unless they have something extremely novel.

While I still believe in the transformative power of data in healthcare (I’ve had two successful exits with analytics companies: RxAnte and Humedica), it’s increasingly clear to me that the current space is beginning to commoditize:

A lot of companies are chasing the same targets. Large providers and insurers are increasingly finding it hard to choose amongst vendors — and as a result, pricing for pure analytics is decreasing.Most platforms provide extremely useful clinical insights, but rely on an end user that they don’t control to act. Hence these companies have no accountability for reducing the cost of healthcare and improving outcomes.Providers and payers are bombarded by different vendors every day. Some offer very elegant data visualization but not necessarily “new” or “better” data, and the underlying issues of accountability and pricing pressure remain.

That’s the bad news. Here’s the good news: There is still plenty of opportunity for startups in this space!

To hear more about the opportunities for startups and investors in healthcare, join VentureBeat at HealthBeat 2014, Oct. 27-28 in San Francisco,

where Mo Kaushal will be diving deeper into the topic.

Evolving policies around payment model reform (in which providers will be paid based on outcomes, not just services rendered) and meaningful use bonus payments for electronic medical record (EMR) adoption demonstrate that the healthcare industry is in the early days of transformation. Ongoing technology innovation, macroeconomics, and policy reactions will continue to accelerate the shift.

This creates a world of opportunity of the healthcare analytics entrepreneur. Despite my concerns over traditional healthcare data analytics companies, there are a few areas I believe we need to accelerate.

Here are some of the criteria I believe will be required in the next generation of healthcare analytics companies:

1. New business models.  For example, companies that are building out a service around a core piece of technology and that can deliver this service much more cost-effectively than any other incumbent competitor.

Navihealth is a great example of this. Navihealth’s core analytics uses patient function to predict the ideal setting upon discharge, coupled with a service model that helps optimize individual care in each post-acute facility. In other words, people in conjunction with the right technology targeting an at-risk business model has helped create a very unique value proposition to end customers.

2. Advanced, proprietary technologies. Beyond data analytics, next-generation artificial intelligence platforms will drive the next wave of innovation. New platforms must be able to ingest multi-source data and reveal novel insights that are actionable and not commoditized. These solutions will displace many current platforms as the data output becomes more valuable.

Vicarious is attacking the market for artificial intelligence by building a unified algorithmic architecture. Along the way, Vicarious has also secured investment from many of the biggest names in tech, including Mark Zuckerberg, Peter Thiel, Jeff Bezos, Jerry Yang, and Marc Benioff (to name a few). I’m also aware of some interesting examples of companies doing this in healthcare, but to my knowledge none of them has emerged from stealth — so watch this space!

3. High-value data sets that can’t be replicated. Companies that can provide proprietary data sets that can’t otherwise be easily obtained are increasingly setting a high bar for entry for new healthcare analytics startups.

This is one of the key reasons Optum acquired Humedica. Humedica is able to extract, standardize, and analyze millions of fully integrated clinical data versus just claims information.

As an investor, my dollars for healthcare analytics companies have already been invested, and it’s time for the next wave of innovation. For my money, healthcare entrepreneurs must focus on unique niches where little competition exists, and they must address those markets using differentiated technologies, data sets, and business models that target large problems.

Where do you see healthcare investment potential?

Mohit (Mo) Kaushal is a partner at Aberdare Ventures. He’s an MD MBA with extensive experience within clinical medicine, venture capital, and health policy. Prior to Aberdare, he was Chief Strategy Officer and EVP of Business Development at West Health, where he developed the West Health Investment Fund strategy and sourced and led investments. Prior to that he was the Director of Connected Health with the FCC, where he established the agency’s first dedicated health care team. He was also a member of the White House Health IT task force, a cross agency team focusing on implementing the technology aspects of Health Reform.

HealthBeat — VentureBeat’s breakthrough health tech event — is returning on Oct 27-28 in San Francisco. This year’s theme is “The connected age: Integrating data, big & small.” We’re putting long-established giants of the health care world on stage with CEOs of the nation's most disruptive health tech companies to share insights, analyze trends, and showcase breakthrough products. Purchase one of the first 50 tickets and save $400!


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Les Européens attendent d'entrer dans le magasin du futur

Les Européens attendent d'entrer dans le magasin du futur | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Les magasins physiques doivent s'approprier les technologies high-tech pour satisfaire les consommateurs Tyler Olson /shutterstock.com(Relaxnews) - Bientôt, Internet ne sera plus un adversaire mais un challenger des magasins physiques, telle est la conclusion phare de l'Observatoire Cetelem en 2014, publié jeudi 6 février

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Jérôme MONANGE's curator insight, February 7, 2014 5:48 AM

Non, le consommateur du futur ne réservera pas ses achats à l'unique sphère d'Internet. 43% des Européens ne comptent pas changer leurs habitudes et continueront à l'avenir de faire leurs courses principalement, ou même exclusivement, en magasins même si l'usage d'internet ( via mobile, tablettes) et l'utilisation des réseaux sociaux est intégré dans leur parcours d'achat  l


Jérôme MONANGE ; Management et Communication LAB RETAIL 2025 

Marketing et Communication & Retail Conseil et Cross Canal & Shopper Expert

http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=4867620&trk=anet_ug_hm ;


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Vers une digitalisation du point de vente

Vers une digitalisation du point de vente | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Pousser l'internaute à se déplacer en magasin, voilà la nouvelle bataille entamée par les enseignes. Que l'achat se fasse en ligne ou en boutique, il convient néanmoins de se démarquer. Les marques doivent offrir une valeur ajoutée ce qu'offre le mariage entre point de vente et technologies digitale
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Cloud computing : enfin des contrats lisibles ?

Cloud computing : enfin des contrats lisibles ? | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it

Cloudwatt, acteur européen du Cloud Computing, annonce la nomination de Laurence Vérité (responsable juridique de Cloudwatt), au sein du groupe d’experts de la Commission Européenne. Ce groupe est « chargé de définir des clauses et des conditions contractuelles sûres et loyales » applicables aux services cloud en Europe. Cette démarche vise à apporter plus de transparence aux utilisateurs sur la circulation des données.

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Digital Health Metrics in 2013

Digital Health Metrics in 2013 | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it

- 95M Americans used mobile for health in 2013

- Pew: 35 percent of US adults are online diagnosers

- Seven in ten doctors have a self-tracking patient

- 31 percent of doctors make Rx decisions from smartphones

- Caregivers are top digital health users, but only 59 percent find online tools helpful

- 72 percent of physicians have tablets

- 43 percent of doctors use mobiles for clinical purposes

- Half of Android health apps have fewer than 500 downloads

- 83 percent of doctors would use mobile EHR apps but don’t have access 

- Mobile, cloud computing are source of most healthcare security worries

- Quarter of nurses have a work smartphoneDrug info is physicians’ top use for mobile

- 45 percent of smartphone users want online physician appointment booking

- Wireless devices improve blood pressure tracking, adherence

- Older heart patients like remote monitoring, prefer in-person visits

- InMedica predicts six times as many US telehealth patients by 2017

- Consumer-driven health plan members more likely to use health apps

- Five percent of broadband households have digital fitness devices

- 1 in 5 broadband households want live chats with health experts

- Report: About 300K patients were remotely monitored in 2012

- 2012: US remote patient monitoring $10.6B market

- US remote patient monitoring topped $104M in 2012

- Remote patient monitoring to save $36B by 2018

- Device interoperability with EHRs could save $30B annually

- 32 percent of Americans want more health messaging

- iPad-equipped medical school class scores 23 percent higher on exams

- Spending on clinical mobility to hit $5.4B in 2016

- 12 percent of care may soon be delivered remotely

- 2018: 5 million disposable, mobile medical sensors18.2M health sensors will ship in 2017

- 18 percent of dermatology apps track or diagnose lesions

- Employee wellness still seems ripe for digital health

- Pregnancy apps more popular than fitness apps

- 61 percent of employees in wellness programs join to earn incentives

- 13M wearables to be used in corporate wellness plans by 2018

- Most US adults track health data but few use digital tools

- Surveys look at digital health adoption, reasons for hesitance

- Mobile health sensor market to hit $5.6B by 2017

- Health, fitness devices to make up half of all wireless accessories shipped by 2018

- 64 million wearables to ship by 2017, with smartwatches leading

 - Health and fitness apps will be key selling points for smartwatches

- 56M sports, fitness monitors to ship in 2017

- Wearable device revenues to grow to $6B in 2018

- Prediction: Wearables to lead the 515 million sensors to ship in 2017

- Health and fitness users prefer iPhones to iPads

- Fitness app installs to grow 60 percent by 2017

- Survey: 82 percent of clinicians to use both smartphones and tablets next year

- 1.7B to download health apps by 2017

- Millennials use health and fitness apps more than other age groups

- More than 1 billion BYOD devices in 2018, more than half will have security software


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Big Content Edges Out Big Data (Gartner Event)

Big Content Edges Out Big Data (Gartner Event) | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
I recently attended a Boston content marketing event by analyst firm Gartner entitled The 3 C’s of Content Marketing.

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SaaS governance: Five key questions - TechRepublic

SaaS governance: Five key questions - TechRepublic | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Increasingly savvy customers are sharpening their requirements for SaaS. Providers must be able to answer these key questions for potential clients.
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Facebook's trillion-edge, Hadoop-based and open source graph-processing engine

Facebook's trillion-edge, Hadoop-based and open source graph-processing engine | Philippine Ruther | Scoop.it
Facebook has detailed its extensive improvements to the open source Apache Giraph graph-processing platform. The project, which is built on top of Hadoop, can now process trillions of connections between people, places and things in minutes.
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DG2's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:10 AM

Many ML algorithms are most readily expressed in terms of local, vertex-centric computations. Think of label propagation, k-means, spectral clustering ... All in all, moving from vector spaces to graphs is the natural thing to do in many applications. Giraph provides an efficient way to run this kind of algorithms on top of an existing Hadoop infrastructure.