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Misreading Derrida: Stiegler, originary technicity, and the différance of différance

Misreading Derrida: Stiegler, originary technicity, and the différance of différance | PhD Research | Scoop.it
Epiphylogenesis, Stiegler writes in the first volume of Technics and Time (1994), is the “conservation, accumulation, and sedimentation of successive epigeneses, mutually articulated” (I:140). In o...
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PhD Research
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Combo Apps Lumigraphe: A Camera Obscura for Your Smartphone

Combo Apps Lumigraphe: A Camera Obscura for Your Smartphone | PhD Research | Scoop.it
I love how hybrid can work magically together, like this Lumigraphe camera box and your iPhone. I was really impressed in how it works. The fact it works with older iPhones, make it even better.

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ISLAM REDA's comment, June 20, 6:11 AM
Photomanipulation + Retouching + Color Grading Tutorial

We will be covering a lot of things in this massive tutorial. You will learn step by step how you can create any cartoon character you imagine using photomanipulation, retouching and color grading techniques. With only Photoshop and stock photos (or your own) you can create a unique caricature that can be a logo, a mascot for a product, a character in an ad, etc.. You can of course use the same techniques explained in this tutorial, in a more subtle way, to spice up your portraits or images.

This tutorial has a massive 89 steps detailing the entire process to achieve the image above and don't worry, all my tutorials can be done by anyone who has basic knowledge of Photoshop. Unlike other tutorials you'll sometimes see out there, you don't need to be a skilled digital painter to achieve the same results I get here - as I'm not a good digital painter myself ;)

Click the link below or the image for more info on this tutorial!
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Thync is a new category of wearable technology that acts in synergy with your mind and body.

Thync is a new category of wearable technology that acts in synergy with your mind and body. | PhD Research | Scoop.it
The Thync Approach

A soothing neck massage. A splash of cold water. A kiss from someone you love. Each action influences peripheral nerves in your head and face, signaling brain regions to change the way you feel. Thync works using the same pathways by delivering low-level electrical pulses to these nerves.

Every day, your body balances the activity between your sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. The sympathetic system is associated with a "fight or flight" response to help regulate your reaction to stress. The parasympathetic system counteracts stress to help you enter a relaxed "rest and digest" mode.

Thync uses neurosignaling to activate specific cranial and peripheral nerves to influence this balance and shift you to a state of calm or give you a boost of energy in minutes.

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Breakthrough DNA Editor Borne of Bacteria | Quanta Magazine

Breakthrough DNA Editor Borne of Bacteria |  Quanta Magazine | PhD Research | Scoop.it
Interest in a powerful DNA editing tool called CRISPR has revealed that bacteria are far more sophisticated than anyone imagined.

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New group seeks to timeline the Anthropocene—when humans became the dominant force on Earth

New group seeks to timeline the Anthropocene—when humans became the dominant force on Earth | PhD Research | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—A team of four scientists has published a Perspectives piece in the journal Science outlining their arguments for reaching back further in time than others have suggested for the beginning of the Anthropocene—a geologic epoch defined by the impact of homo sapiens on planet Earth. William Ruddiman, Erle Ellis, Jed Kaplan and Dorian Fuller suggest that current arguments that point to modern exploits overlook the huge impact of forest clearing and farming many thousands of years ago.

Humans have had a major impact on planet Earth, there is no debating that. But have our efforts resulted in an un-reversible geologic impact? And if so, when exactly did it happen? That is what climatologists, geologists and other scientists have been debating for the past several years. Back in 2000 Paul Crutzen and Eugene Stoermer published a paper igniting the debate by coining the word Anthropocene to describe what they felt was the current epoch—where humans are the driving force, instead of nature. They suggested its start was the 1700's because that was when the industrial revolution got going.

Over the past fifteen years, many others have published papers offering their ideas on when the Anthropocene got its start, with some debating whether it ever really did. In this new paper, the authors suggest that if a start date is to be identified it should take into account the massive changes wrought by cutting down forests and the start of agriculture, which they say pushes the date back 11,000 years, or perhaps to the time when humans began wiping out other large animals such as the woolly mammoth, around 50,000 years ago.

The thing that is making it difficult to settle the matter is the absence of a clearly identifiable marker, known as a golden spike, e.g., the comet that killed off the dinosaurs. Some have suggested that scientists finding traces of radiation worldwide from nuclear tests is such a marker, while others point to the finding of carbon ash (due to burning coal) in soils.

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The Face Detection Algorithm Set To Revolutionise Image Search | MIT Technology Review

The Face Detection Algorithm Set To Revolutionise Image Search | MIT Technology Review | PhD Research | Scoop.it

The ability to spot faces from any angle, and even when partially occluded, has always been a uniquely human capability. Not any more.


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Japanese scientists can read dreams in breakthrough with MRI scans

Japanese scientists can read dreams in breakthrough with MRI scans | PhD Research | Scoop.it

Japanese scientists find way to use magnetic resonance imaging to unravel nighttime visions of unconscious mind in breakthrough study


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A Machine That Trains Your Brain to Pay Attention

A Machine That Trains Your Brain to Pay Attention | PhD Research | Scoop.it
A new brain-scanning technique could change the way scientists think about human focus.

Human attention isn’t stable, ever, and it costs us: lives lost when drivers space out, billions of dollars wasted on inefficient work, and mental disorders that hijack focus. Much of the time, people don’t realize they’ve stopped paying attention until it’s too late. This “flight of the mind,” as Virginia Woolf called it, is often beyond conscious control.

So researchers at Princeton set out to build a tool that could show people what their brains are doing in real time, and signal the moments when their minds begin to wander. And they've largely succeeded, a paper published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience reports. The scientists who invented this attention machine, led by professor Nick Turk-Browne, are calling it a “mind booster.” It could, they say, change the way we think about paying attention—and even introduce new ways of treating illnesses like depression.

Here’s how the brain decoder works: You lie down in an a functional magnetic resonance imaging machine (fMRI)—similar to the MRI machines used to diagnose diseases—which lets scientists track brain activity. Once you're in the scanner, you watch a series of pictures and press a button when you see certain targets. The task is like a video game—the dullest video game in the world, really, which is the point. You see a face, overlaid atop an image of a landscape. Your job is to press a button if the face is female, as it is 90 percent of the time, but not if it’s male. And ignore the landscape. (There’s also a reverse task, in which you’re asked to judge whether the scene is outside or inside, and ignore the faces.)


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The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking

The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking | PhD Research | Scoop.it

"Big idea: Teaching kids to ask smart questions on their own

A four-year-old asks on average about 400 questions per day, and an adult hardly asks any. Our school system is structured around rewards for regurgitating the right answer, and not asking smart questions – in fact, it discourages asking questions. With the result that as we grow older, we stop asking questions. Yet asking good questions is essential to find and develop solutions, and an important skill in innovation, strategy, and leadership. So why do we stop asking questions – and more importantly, why don’t we train each other, and our future leaders, to ask the right questions starting from early on?"

 


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niftyjock's curator insight, February 8, 9:32 PM

dice student

Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, February 9, 11:11 AM

Anything that gives students a chance to ask their own questions is a good idea in my opinion.  When the questions invoke critical thinking, it's a double bonus!  Also, writing these questions on any pre-made box would work.  No need to be crafty with scissors and tape.

Simon Awuyo's curator insight, February 11, 2:04 PM

The student teachers need these tips to help them cultivate skills of asking probing questions to become better teachers tomorrow.

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Mindclones from Social Media: New Research from Stanford Suggests Feasibility - h+ Magazine

Mindclones from Social Media: New Research from Stanford Suggests Feasibility - h+ Magazine | PhD Research | Scoop.it

In popular sci-fi show 'Black Mirror', realistic digital personalities of the dead, mind clones, are recreated from data alone. How realistic is this idea?


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Can LSD Make You A Billionaire?

Can LSD Make You A Billionaire? | PhD Research | Scoop.it

According to an insider interview of an entrepreneur from Silicone Valley, all the billionaires with cutting edge ideas use LSD frequently as a way to gain advanced insights.


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The Selfie Syndrome- Great Visual ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The Selfie Syndrome- Great Visual ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | PhD Research | Scoop.it
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Lucid Dreaming is a Key to Incredible Intelligence

Lucid Dreaming is a Key to Incredible Intelligence | PhD Research | Scoop.it

Lucid dreaming is a sign of incredible intelligence and problem-solving skills in waking life, new research shows


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Brain Implants Could Help Alzheimer’s and Others with Severe Memory Damage | MIT Technology Review

Brain Implants Could Help Alzheimer’s and Others with Severe Memory Damage | MIT Technology Review | PhD Research | Scoop.it
A maverick neuroscientist believes he has deciphered the code by which the brain forms long-term memories.

 

Theodore Berger, biomedicínský inženýr a neurolog v Los Angeles, si budoucnost pacientů s těžkou poruchou paměti představuje tak, že jí bude moci opět získat pomoc z elektronického implantátu. U lidí, jejichž mozek utrpěl poškození, mrtvici nebo Alzheimerova chorobu, narušení neuronální sítě často brání vytváření dlouhodobých vzpomínek. Již více než dvě desetiletí, Berger navrhuje křemíkové čipy napodobující signály, který tyto neurony vytvářeli, když řádně fungovali. 


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The Basics of Making Engaging Flipping Videos * Flipped Learning Network

The Basics of Making Engaging Flipping Videos * Flipped Learning Network | PhD Research | Scoop.it
The very basics of what to do when making educational videos for flipping a class. Many thanks to Jaclyn Pessel @chempessel, Meghan Klement @klemistry and Cara Johnson @AHSAnatomy for volunteering to be in this video!

Content Times:
0:12 Turn off your phone
0:36 Silence extraneous noises
1:00 Post a “Do Not Disturb” sign
1:26 Make sure you are actually recording
1:41 Look at the camera
2:08 Think about the video background
2:30 Remain stationary
2:52 Use big text
3:44 DON’T USE ALL CAPS!
3:55 Use drop shadow
4:20 Video length
4:53 Speak at a normal pace
5:22 Summary

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Next Big Future: Cambridge Professor of Neuroscience Communication says Brain Uploading is possible into a 100 trillion circuit system

Next Big Future: Cambridge Professor of Neuroscience Communication says Brain Uploading is possible into a 100 trillion circuit system | PhD Research | Scoop.it
Dr Hannah Critchlow strips down the brain. Using Radio, TV and Festival platforms she designs, produces and presents brainy interactive experiences for the public. She has featured on BBC, Sky and ITV channels and presented live events to over 30, 000 people across the globe. She is Neuroscience public engagement professor at Cambridge University.

In 2014 Hannah was named as a Top 100 UK scientist by the Science Council for her work in science communication.


At the Telegraph UK, Dr Hannah Critchlow said that if a computer could be built to recreate the 100 trillion connections in the brain their it would be possible to exist inside a programme.

Dr Critchlow, who spoke at the Hay Festival on ‘busting brain myths’ said that although the brain was enormously complex, it worked like a large circuit board and scientists were beginning to understand the function of each part.

Asked if it would be possible one day to download consciousness onto a machine, she said: “If you had a computer that could make those 100 trillion circuit connections then that circuit is what makes us us, and so, yes, it would be possible.

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Science’s Path From Myth to Multiverse | Quanta Magazine

Science’s Path From Myth to Multiverse |  Quanta Magazine | PhD Research | Scoop.it
We can think of the history of physics as an attempt to unify the world around us: Gradually, over many centuries, we’ve come to see that seemingly unrelated phenomena are intimately connected. The physicist Steven Weinberg of the University of Texas, Austin, received his Nobel Prize in 1979 for a major breakthrough in that quest — showing how electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force are manifestations of the same underlying theory (he shared the prize with Abdus Salam and Sheldon Glashow). That work became a cornerstone of the Standard Model of particle physics, which describes how the fundamental building blocks of the universe come together to create the world we see.

In his new book To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science, Weinberg examines how modern science was born. By tracing the development of what we now call the “scientific method” — an approach, developed over centuries, that emphasizes experiments and observations rather than reasoning from first principles — he makes the argument that science, unlike other ways of interpreting the world around us, can offer true progress. Through science, our understanding of the world improves over time, building on what has come before. Mistakes can happen, but are eventually corrected. Weinberg spoke with Quanta Magazine about the past and future of physics, the role of philosophy within science, and the startling possibility that the universe we see around us is a tiny sliver of a much larger multiverse. An edited and condensed version of the interview follows.

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Mothers can pass traits to their offspring through bacteria's DNA, mouse study shows

Mothers can pass traits to their offspring through bacteria's DNA, mouse study shows | PhD Research | Scoop.it

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown that the DNA of bacteria that live in the body can pass a trait to offspring in a way similar to the parents' own DNA. According to the authors, the discovery means scientists need to consider a significant new factor -- the DNA of microbes passed from mother to child -- in their efforts to understand how genes influence illness and health. The study appears online Feb. 16 in Nature.


Bacteria are most familiar through their roles in harmful infections. But scientists have realized that such bacteria are only a tiny fraction of the bacterial communities that live in and on our bodies. Most bacteria are commensal, which means they do not cause harm and often confer benefits.


Commensal bacteria influence traits such as weight and behavior. But until now, researchers thought the bacteria that exerted these effects were acquired during a person's life. The study is the first to show that bacterial DNA can pass from parent to offspring in a manner that affects specific traits such as immunity and inflammation.


The researchers linked commensal bacteria in mice to the animals' susceptibility to a gut injury. Mice with certain inherited bacteria are susceptible to the injury, which is caused by exposure to a chemical. Female mice pass the bacteria to their offspring, making them vulnerable to the injury. Others carrying different bacteria are less susceptible.


In several fields of research, scientists have been confronted intermittently with the sudden, unexplained appearance of new or altered traits in mice. The traits often spread from one mouse habitat to the next, suggesting a spreading microbial infection is responsible. But the traits also consistently pass from mother to offspring, suggesting a genetic cause.


Thaddeus Stappenbeck, MD, PhD, a professor of pathology and immunology, and co-senior author Virgin, the Edward Mallinckrodt Professor of Pathology and head of the Department of Pathology and Immunology, encountered this problem in their studies of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. They were surprised to find that roughly half their mice had low levels in the gut of IgA, an antibody linked to these disorders.


IgA helps defend the body against harmful invaders. It is commonly present in mucus made by the body in areas where the exterior world encounters the body's interior, such as the eyes, nose, throat and gut. When the scientists housed mice with low levels of the antibody with mice that had high levels of the antibody, all of the mice ended up with low antibody levels in a few weeks. When they bred the mice, the offspring whose mothers had low levels of the antibody also had low levels.


Eventually, the scientists learned that one of the culprits likely responsible for the spread of low antibody levels is a bacterium called Sutterella. This bacterium and others found in the low-IgA mice could explain both ways that decreased antibody levels were spreading: Mice that were housed together acquired low antibody levels through normal spread of the bacteria, and mouse mothers passed the same bacteria to their descendants.


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Here's Why the Technological Singularity is Going to Happen

Here's Why the Technological Singularity is Going to Happen | PhD Research | Scoop.it

Here's one quick way the technological singularity, strong AI (or "artificial general intelligence") could happen, to convince even the most skeptical of readers that it is absolutely possible.


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Thomas Blake's curator insight, March 24, 11:25 PM

In the near future we will be approaching the computing power required to run a simulation of the human brain. Artificial Intelligence as we know it today would dramatically change at that point as any further technology would theoretically be smarter than a human. This event is called the singularity and was hypothesised by Von Neumann back in the 50's. This would have an adverse effect on human society as scientific research and other further advancements in technology could be developed by computers rather than humans.

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Virtual-Reality Porn Is Coming, and Your Fantasies May Never Be the Same | WIRED

Virtual-Reality Porn Is Coming, and Your Fantasies May Never Be the Same | WIRED | PhD Research | Scoop.it

You’re not watching a scene anymore; you’re inhabiting it. And by being there, you’re implicated in whatever’s happening.


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Helping Students Fail: A Framework

Helping Students Fail: A Framework | PhD Research | Scoop.it

"As teachers, allowing students to see failure as a negative experience is one of the worst things we can do.

Granted, this isn’t unique to education. The idea of risk-taking, failing, looking, leaping, try-try-again is ingrained in our cultural DNA. But in education, we certainly have made it dramatic. In fact, we don’t even need the whole word anymore. Failure erodes to fail, which itself erodes to simply F..."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 5, 5:46 PM

In education we many students are told they have "failed" yet as teachers we know that making mistakes is the norm. Engineers look at failures as a way to learn. What can we do in education?

This post explores:

* What does it mean to "fail"?

* The role of failure in learning

* Helping Students Fail: A Framework which has four sections, each of which provides "the idea" and guiding questions.

Where can you start as a teacher?

* By clarifying the meaning

* By providing context

* By designing transparent processes

* By illuminating progress

Students need to learn that a "failure" is not the end of the road, but a stop on a journey. As teachers this post provides a number of suggestions that may help us better meet the needs of our students and help them see failure in a different light.

Art Lang's curator insight, February 5, 8:56 PM

Do you think helping students fail will facilitate better learning?

luc taesch's curator insight, February 7, 6:14 AM
failing is earning.
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What Your Smartphone Is Doing To Your Body & Mind

What Your Smartphone Is Doing To Your Body & Mind | PhD Research | Scoop.it

On average, people pick up their smartphone 221 times a day to do things with it. It's no secret that we are getting more and more addicted to these handsets, but have you wondered what effect that is having on your mind and your body? Scientists are definitely curious and have a few ideas


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, January 19, 8:28 AM

A short light article but with lots of links to research data.


faith ward's curator insight, January 24, 8:39 AM

Research data in the article is very interesting. 

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Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories

Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories | PhD Research | Scoop.it

Nanowerk is the leading nanotechnology portal, committed to educate, inform and inspire about nanotechnologies, nanosciences, and other emerging technologies


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The Science of Storytelling

The Science of Storytelling | PhD Research | Scoop.it

Many studies show us that our brains prefer storytelling to facts.When we read facts, only the language parts of our brains work to understand the meaning. When we read a story, the language parts of our brains and any other part of the brain that we would use if we were actually experiencing what we’re reading, light up.This means that it’s easier for us to remember stories than facts. Our brains can't make major distinctions between a story we’re reading about and something we are actually doing....


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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 1, 2014 3:55 PM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, October 3, 2014 2:02 AM

One more proof to show how important storytelling may be!

Birgitta Edberg's curator insight, March 29, 3:31 PM

Learn how storytelling affect your brain.

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The Near Future Of Implantable Technology - YouTube

Jennifer French is the 2012 Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year, a silver medalist in sailing, and a quadriplegic. She is the first woman to receive the implanted ...


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Remote-controlled cyborg moth ‘biobots’ to monitor emergency-response operations | KurzweilAI

Remote-controlled cyborg moth ‘biobots’ to monitor emergency-response operations | KurzweilAI | PhD Research | Scoop.it

North Carolina State University researchers have developed methods for electronically manipulating the flight muscles of moths and for monitoring the electrical signals that moths use to control those muscles. The goal: remotely-controlled moths, or “biobots,” for use in emergency response, such as search and rescue operations.

“The idea would be to attach sensors to moths … to create a flexible, aerial sensor network that can identify survivors or public health hazards in the wake of a disaster,” said Alper Bozkurt, PhD, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at NC State and co-author of a JOVE paper on the work.

Bozkurt, with Amit Lal, PhD, of Cornell University, previously developed a method for attaching electrodes to a moth during its pupal stage, when the caterpillar is in a cocoon undergoing metamorphosis. Now, Bozkurt’s research team wants to find out precisely how a moth coordinates its muscles during flight.


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