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The brains behind Calico? Bill Maris of Google Ventures

The brains behind Calico? Bill Maris of Google Ventures | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
As you may have heard, Google is back in the health business with Calico, a new antiaging initiative. Now we know who is behind Calico -- and just how much Google is betting on it. The news broke l...

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New Treato Pharma Release Brings Real-time "Patient Voice" Intelligence into ... - DigitalJournal.com

New Treato Pharma Release Brings Real-time "Patient Voice" Intelligence


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Faith Busch's curator insight, September 22, 2013 2:09 AM
Need to find out more about Treato
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New Treato Pharma Release Brings Real-time "Patient Voice" Intelligence into ... - DigitalJournal.com

New Treato Pharma Release Brings Real-time "Patient Voice" Intelligence into ...

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Faith Busch's curator insight, September 22, 2013 2:09 AM
Need to find out more about Treato
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Today's 8 Consumer Habits Of the COMsumer [INFOGRAPH] - Social Media Pearls

Today's 8 Consumer Habits Of the COMsumer [INFOGRAPH] - Social Media Pearls | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Today's consumer is a COMsumer. Here are Today's 8 Consumer habits of that savvy consumer.
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Patient Experience Parameters As Suggested by Consumers

Patient Experience Parameters As Suggested by Consumers | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Patient experience parameters are analyzed from hospital surveys. Patient experience attributes are shared as defined by the consumer.

Via Shirley A Williams
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Shirley A Williams's curator insight, August 18, 2013 6:06 PM

Are measuring a transactional health care system or an experiential one?

Art Jones's curator insight, August 19, 2013 9:23 AM

#Insightful #Thoughtprovoking

Shirley A Williams's comment, August 29, 2013 3:01 PM
Thank you Art, I really appreciate the feedback
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Email Marketing Open Rates

Email Marketing Open Rates | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Check out the average open rates across several industries and three different list sizes. Read about the latest trends in email marketing open rates and tips to increase your open rates.
Jen Fuhrman-Kestler's insight:

These industry benchmarks are always helpful!

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7 Myths of Patient Portals, Access & Engagement Infographic

7 Myths of Patient Portals, Access & Engagement Infographic | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

A recent study of 1,000 U.S. adults  found that 79 percent of patients would be more likely to return to a facility that offers online image portal and 76 percent indicated they would recommend the facility to others. Yet many providers are missing this referral opportunity.

 

This Infographic highlights what patients are looking for in terms of medical images, patient portals, and online access to those images.

 Some of the myth busting perferences include:
Myth: Age will be a Hurdle for AdoptionAge has little impact, 59 percent of respondents over the age of 71 were very likely to use an image portalNeed to manage family members images a driver for portal use

Myth: IT Competency Can Restrict Use 

Even when self-assessed as very basic IT competency, patients are still very likely to use the imaging portal

Myth: Security Concerns Prevent Use 

Only 17 percent of survey respondents are unlikely to use an imaging portal4 out of 7 cite security concerns
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Dan Baxter's curator insight, August 26, 2013 5:25 AM

Interesting outcomes for a study for using online portals to provide patients with access to their diagnostic imaging results. Especially like the question around age groups. Older people want to access health services via the web too!!

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5 reasons why Twitter is better than Facebook for physicians

5 reasons why Twitter is better than Facebook for physicians | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

For physicians looking to prioritize their social media time, here are five reasons why Twitter beats Facebook:

 

1.  Clear privacy settings –Facebook’s privacy settings are difficult to understand, and the site’s privacy policy is updated so frequently, it can be a struggle for some users to stay abreast of changes, Husain points out. Conversely, Twitter’s settings are much more straightforward, and because fewer profiles are set to private, it’s easier to engage with users you don’t know.

 

2.  Higher level of peer review – For physicians looking to engage in medical conversations, Husain says Twitter offers a much higher level of peer review than Facebook ever could – and he’s right. Twitter allows users to see content from others they are not following; so more physicians may have the opportunity to review content that’s tweeted.

 

3.  Greater search capability – Although Facebook is in the process of rolling out hashtags for users to organize their content and it recently introduced Graph Search, its searchability still doesn’t come close to rivaling Twitter. On Twitter, physicians can search hashtags with trending topics and find a multitude of posts from other users, without needing to follow those users.

 

4.  Concise and simple posts – While Facebook fans may balk at the notion of limiting themselves to 140 characters, Twitter users see the beauty behind concise posting. Rather than sifting through lengthily and often irrelevant status updates, physicians can quickly scroll through short Tweets to find the news and other information that matches their interests.

 

5.  Unfiltered posting – As Pam Dyer, marketing manager at SolutionsIQ, explains in an article on Social Media Today, Facebook uses a complex algorithm, called EdgeRank, to determine where a post shows up on a user’s newsfeed. Posts on Twitter will appear to all of a physician’s followers, regardless of the content. 


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Sven Awege's curator insight, August 22, 2013 4:15 PM

All good points, but depends also on what you are trying to achieve!

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Patient education may be key to reducing hospit...

Patient education may be key to reducing hospit... | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Despite a nation-wide effort to increase adherence to hand-washing, hospitals continue to be a breeding ground for dangerous, preventable infections.

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ePocrates 2013 mobile trends report

ePocrates 2013 mobile trends report | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
A newly-released report from ePocrates shows how healthcare professionals are using mobile in 2013 and looks to what 2014 will bring.

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Sven Awege's curator insight, August 20, 2013 5:54 AM

Click on the white paper to get the short report. Excellent information and insights, but will frustrate those looking for detailed info on their own target specialist segments!

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How are consumers using social media for health?

How are consumers using social media for health? | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
According to  Pew Internet as of May 2013, almost three quarters (72%) of online U.S. adults use social networking sites, up from 67% in late 2012. When we first started asking about social...
[[ This is a content summary only.

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Innovation Saves Lives: How Business Process Management can improve Patient Care

Together, through business process management, IBM and The Ottawa Hospital brought reform to the healthcare management system and the circle of care. In a bi...

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[Study] New game app improves adherence among diabetes patients

[Study] New game app improves adherence among diabetes patients | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

A new mobile game app designed by CyberDoctor showed improvements in medication adherence, diet and exercise in diabetes patients, according to a study.

 

The company said that breakthrough clinical trial results for the game, called PatientPartner," documented for the first time the effectiveness of a story-driven game in changing health behavior and biomarkers. The study was conducted among 100 nonadherence patients at Hershey, Pa.-based Pinnacle Health Systems and presented at the Health2.0 Conference Wednesday in Santa Clara, Calif.


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Sven Awege's curator insight, October 8, 2013 4:10 AM

Looks convincing. Strange though that there has not been more engagement here from Pharma - could be that it still costs too much (time and money) for the lifecycle of a typical Pharma maketeer (tick the box and move to next position in less than 2 years)!

ebee's curator insight, November 11, 2013 7:41 AM

Study documenting effectiveness of story-driven game in decreasing blood sugar levels in diabetes patients.

Caresharing's curator insight, January 30, 2014 6:08 AM

Conclusion: Let diabetes patients play. :)

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Slideshow: 10 patients apps from US children’s hospitals | mobihealthnews

Slideshow: 10 patients apps from US children’s hospitals | mobihealthnews | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Slideshow: 10 patients apps from US children’s hospitals http://t.co/VluRd1SjHC via @MobiHealthNews #mHealth #healthapps #digitalhealth


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Aurélien's curator insight, September 21, 2013 10:07 AM

"Children’s hospitals are far and away the most creative and ambitious of healthcare providers in the United States using mobile apps for patient engagement."

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Can Social Media Data Find a Place in EHRs?

Can Social Media Data Find a Place in EHRs? | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Social media technologies and their popularity have exploded in the past decade, and it’s not just patients who are getting in on the action. Physicians and health care organizations alike are increasingly utilizing text messaging, Twitter, Facebook, and other social media technologies in an effort to explore their potential benefits.

 

It’s a wise strategic move, according to the PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) 2012 Health Research Institute report that found health care organizations that “ignore the virtual environment could find themselves losing customers to competitors that do use social media to listen to and engage with consumers.”

Thus far, most of the research in this area has focused on social media technologies as marketing tools, a way to listen to what patients are saying about their experiences and engaging them.

 

“[In the PwC research paper], we gave examples of how hospitals are using social media, and they are not limiting their imaginations to just marketing and listening to people’s feedback about the company; they are starting to think about how to use social media for services and other aspects of their business,” says John Edwards, a PwC spokesperson and director in the Healthcare Strategy & Healthcare Business Intelligence Practice.

 

Edwards cites a 2012 research statistic from the Hospital Social Network List that shows more than 1,200 US hospitals now are using social media sites, a 30% increase from the previous year. “That is a pretty significant trend toward adopting social media, so it would suggest that hospitals are finding uses for social media as part of their strategies, and that it’s a growing trend,” he says.

But what about taking social media one step further and using it as a health record tool? What benefits could be seen from including social media exchanges in the patient record, and would such benefits override the obvious—and not-so-obvious—obstacles that arise?

 

A Place in the EHR?


Social media and health care experts seem to agree that social media exchanges could add important and interesting information to the care process, but where exactly this information fits in—and how to go about incorporating it—is up for debate.

  


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Establishing relationship with your pharmacist can help in understanding ... - PennLive.com

Establishing relationship with your pharmacist can help in understanding ... - PennLive.com | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Establishing relationship with your pharmacist can help in understanding ...
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How patients learn in the digital age (Infographic)

How patients learn in the digital age (Infographic) | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
How Patients Learn In The Digital Age infographic by HealthEd.

Via Isabelle Delignière-Léglise, Thierry Le Magny, Shirley A Williams
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A healthcare innovator's guide to must-know tech terms for the next decade of medicine

A healthcare innovator's guide to must-know tech terms for the next decade of medicine | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Electronic medical records. DNA sequencing. Big data. These technology trends are changing the way medicine is practiced today — but what’s coming next?

 

From artificial intelligence to natural language to processing to MEMS, here are some technologies that will change the future of healthcare.

 

Artificial intelligence/algorithm medicine

Predictive analytics tools that use data to help healthcare administrators identify high-risk patients and make efficient decisions are already in place in many hospitals. Now companies are developing decision support tools for clinicians that compare an individual patient’s data to large amounts of historical outcomes data.

 

Internet of things

This concept takes remote patient monitoring to the next level, involving multiple connected devices that can coordinate with each other through a wireless network without human intervention. Sharp, who’s in charge of clinical informatics research at Cleveland Clinic, says hospitals have just scratched the surface of this with smart infusion pumps and RFID tagging. “There’s potential for a lot of these things to talk to each other and raise alerts when something is out of whack, and potentially even detect infections,” he said.

 

MEMS

Short for micro electro mechanical systems, MEMS involves the use of miniaturized sensors, actuators and electronics that are smaller than the thickness of a human hair. Such technology has already penetrated the research market, with speedier, more precise tools for biologists and chemists. Now companies like CardioMems and MicroCHIPS are working on commercial implantable devices that can transmit data outside of the body for clinical use. However, regulation remains a big question here.

 

Wearable medical devices

We’re not just talking about the fitness bands you wear around your wrist. We’re talking flexible electronics — lightweight, portable sensors that could be, for example, adhered to the skin to collect biometric data. Or swallowable (not technically wearable, but it’s the same idea) smart pills that let clinicians know when patients aren’t taking their medications. The hope is that these devices could help patients and clinicians manage chronic diseases.


Natural language processing

The medical scribe business is hot. But another way of easing the burden of collecting patient data – especially the kind that’s anecdotal – is also heating up. Some EHR vendors have embedded voice transcription technologies into their products, and more advanced products that give structure to unstructured data are on the way. Some say natural language processing could change the way we interact with healthcare data, the same way that Siri has changed the way people interact with their cellphones.

 

Medical tricorder

Nokia and XPRIZE are hunting for a medical tricorder, armed with $10 million as a reward, but this movement is much bigger than the contest. Sensors, mobile technology and at-home medicine meet in this concept, which calls for development of a portable screening device consumers could use to self-diagnose medical conditions a la Star Trek. Scanadu’s Scout is the most high-profile device under development, but there are dozens of teams across the world working toward this goal.


Precision medicine

From targeted cancer drugs to molecular diagnostics, advances in genome sequencing are driving precision medicine. It’s defined by Pfizer as “an approach to discovering and developing medicines and vaccines that deliver superior outcomes for patients, by integrating clinical and molecular information to understand the basis of disease.”

 

Some use precision medicine synonymously with personalized medicine. Others say it’s a better term that captures the idea of personalized medicine more clearly: Not as medical care that’s tailored to an individual but rather the ability to classify individuals into smaller populations that might be more susceptible to certain diseases or respond to drugs differently. This term has been slowly gaining steam since 2011.

 

Workflow automation

Time-consuming administrative tasks like medical billing, revenue cycle management and inventory management are prime targets for automating IT solutions. As more data becomes digital rather than paper-based, more opportunities open for innovation in this area to save time in hospitals and physician practices.



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Study: More consumers turn to social media for health research

Study: More consumers turn to social media for health research | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
By Mia Burns
During the past two years, social media use in healthcare has increased 21 percent, according to Kantar Media’s 2013 Online Behavior Study.
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Digital Health And The Pharmacy: A Prescription For Success

Digital Health And The Pharmacy: A Prescription For Success | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Much has been written about the emergence of digital health, the changing role of the physician and the more active role that patients will be taking in care. But there’s one voice that is occasionally missing from the discussion and it very well may be one of the most important voices in the changing health care environment–the pharmacist.

Donald Hackett & Lou Scalpati have been in the healthcare space for nearly 25 years. With their latest venture, RxWiki, Inc. Don and Lou are focusing on one trend they believe is here to stay—digitally connecting patients to their pharmacist.  The big question was how the company would leverage its innovative platforms and health content to change the way pharmacists and patients communicate. The answer has been two-part: trusted, pharmacist-created content and synchronized digital distribution. Or simply put, digital health was now part of the pharmacy experience.  Disclosure:  I have consulted with RxWiki in the past.

RxWiki has developed a suite of digital solutions that enables pharmacies and pharmacists to reach and engage patients with actionable news and medication information through a number of media distribution outlets and digital devices.

 

 


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Sven Awege's curator insight, August 22, 2013 4:03 PM

Good read, triggers a bit of thinking.

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'Digital omnivore' physicians across specialties embracing mHealth and tablets

'Digital omnivore' physicians across specialties embracing mHealth and tablets | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Providers across all specialties and all clinical roles are increasingly becoming “digital omnivores” and embracing smartphones, tablets, and laptops in the consult room and beyond.

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Hospital says COPD app could cut readmissions by 40 percent

Hospital says COPD app could cut readmissions by 40 percent | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

"Futura mHealth, a Philadelphia-based joint venture from Futura Mobility and Temple University Hospital, has developed an app the company says can reduce hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by 38 to 40 percent.

 

A chronic lung condition, COPD manifests itself as occasional attacks of extreme shortness of breath, called exacerbations, which usually lead to a patient being hospitalized, as well as losing an average of three years of life expectancy per attack, according to Futura mHealth CEO David Gulian. But those attacks can be detected up to seven days beforehand and prevented with early treatment.

 

SmartScope is an HTML5 app that has COPD patients fill out an eight-question survey once a day and sends that information back to their provider, who then assesses their likelihood of an attack based on their answers. Certain questions require the patient to use devices like a peak-flow meter or a thermometer. Gulian said Bluetooth-enabled devices can take the measurements and put them in the app, but the devices are too expensive for most patients, so most use non-connected devices instead and enter data manually."


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3 ideas for pharma companies to become bigger players in mobile health

3 ideas for pharma companies to become bigger players in mobile health | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
One research firm thinks that pharma companies' app have been too niche, not designed with best practices in mind and not integrated with companies' core business.

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The Use of Social Media (Tools) in Clinical Research Collaboration

These are the supporting slides from a talk by Joel Selzer at the Society of Clinical Research Associates conference on "Harnessing Social Media to Advance Clinical Research"


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Mindy M Walker's curator insight, August 7, 2013 2:36 PM

Good presentation of ideas about using #socialmedia in the clinical research environment.

Rowan Norrie's curator insight, August 8, 2013 5:08 AM

Great presentation on how social media tools can be utilised to support collabortion and present a personalised view of the results.