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New Uses for Pinterest by Pharma

New Uses for Pinterest by Pharma | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Intouch Solutions Jennifer Hague takes a look at new opportunities for pharma to use Pinterest.

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Twitter is developing tool for judging the users mental health

Twitter is developing tool for judging the users mental health | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Twitter is in its way to improve the allocation of mental health services around the world with the new tool to map moods. Recently, Australian researchers have introduced the online tool, named as ‘We Feel’ to the world. This tool is equipped with a technology that can analyze over 32,000 tweets every minute. Most of those tweets were being linked to various emotions like anger, sadness, love, joy, fear and surprise. Twitter has saved this data and decided to make it use to monitor emotions of every individual as well as every community that appears on Twitter page from different areas.


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FDA Helping Pharma Operationalize Social Media - MediaPost Communications

FDA Helping Pharma Operationalize Social Media - MediaPost Communications | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
FDA Helping Pharma Operationalize Social Media MediaPost Communications I am pleased to report that the Food & Drug Administration, through its first social media guidance has provided significant help for the makers of prescription medicines to...
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Social Media Things Pharma Can Do Now* | New Solutions Factory

Social Media Things Pharma Can Do Now* | New Solutions Factory | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Alert: social media guidance from the FDA has been issued. It’s not comprehensive. It’s not the final word. But it is eye-opening. And as I read it, the FDA has laid the groundwork for pharma companies to move ahead with proactive social media engagement. See if you agree:


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Richard Meyer's curator insight, January 31, 4:08 PM

Pharma can turn on the “comments” field. For understandable reasons, pharma’s med/legal teams have very literally interpreted the prohibition against off-label marketing when it comes to social media comments. The thinking goes like this: If we let a user post on our YouTube channel, and he comments about how much our product helped his psoriasis … but we’re only approved for rheumatoid arthritis … that would make our channel off-label. Therefore, no comments allowed. The FDA puts this fear to rest:

“FDA will not ordinarily view UGC (user-generated content) on firm-owned or firm-controlled venues such as blogs, message boards, and chat rooms as promotional content on behalf of the firm as long as the user has no affiliation with the firm and the firm had no influence on the UGC.”

Pharma manufacturers will only be held responsible for content reasonably attributed to their own people (including agencies and paid spokespeople). Not the general public. If SuzieQ81 rants on a pharma Facebook page, the manufacturer will still have to deal with her post — just like marketers in every other industry — but it will be a marketing concern, not a legal one.

 
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Engaging Patients Through Social Media | IMS Institute

Engaging Patients Through Social Media | IMS Institute | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

IMS's Top 10 Pharma Social Media Engagers

By Ben Comer | Published: January 21, 2014

The IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics worked up a methodology for assessing the effectiveness of pharma’s social media efforts across Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, according to three indices: reach (total number of people reached through each channel via likes, shares and re-tweets); relevance (extent to which content is being shared and forwarded); and relationship (amount of back and forth between company and patient).

Those pharmas hitting the trifecta scored best on the cumulative “Social Media Engagement Index.” Results were tallied over a two-year period. Here are the top ten pharma engagers, per IMS Health. To read the full report, which discusses the role of Wikipedia, healthcare professionals’ use of social media, and a summary of social media regulatory policy in the US, Canada and the EU, click here. And the winners are:

 

IMS Health Social Engagement Index

1. Johnson & Johnson

2. GlaxoSmithKline

3.Novo Nordisk

4. Pfizer

5. Novartis

6. Boehringer Ingelheim

7. Bayer

8. Merck

9. AstraZeneca

10. UCB

In a separate article, consultants at Capgemini Consulting Life Sciences wonder if social media in pharma has reached a tipping point. PharmExec’s sibling company, CBI, is hosting its annual iPharma conference in New York City this May.


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rob halkes's curator insight, February 3, 10:12 AM

It says that the self evident suspects have done the trick of social media again. What has it brought to them, besides being positioned in these lists. Has thier image raised for patients and physicians, the public in gerenal? I guess they know it, but we don't see publications of it. Do we?

Indeed there's a tipping point reached in what a pharma company may reach in doing social media in their engagement to the public in general. Now there's the time to develop their information (and promotion) channel in to interactive channels, producing support and collaboration to improve patient care. That is however, a much more challenging demand than using just social media with a multichannel mix. It depends upon their strategic starting point of what pharma wants to do for its commercial development. Now is the move to upper management  ;-)

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Video: Accenture Consumer Survey on #PatientEngagement

Video: Accenture Consumer Survey on #PatientEngagement | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Accenture’s latest Consumer Survey on Patient Engagement shows that patients want to be more active, engaged participants in their healthcare. Risk bearers would be wise to change at pace with consumers’ communication preferences.

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Stephen Dean's curator insight, June 12, 7:25 AM

Consumerism hits healthcare. Over 50% of patients would be willing to switch physicians for anytime, anywhere online access.

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Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, LinkedIn – Social Media Stats 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, LinkedIn – Social Media Stats 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, LinkedIn – Social Media Stats 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC]

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ConfluenceSocialMarketing's curator insight, January 25, 10:34 AM

Great infographics on the various networks.

Ewa Sulima's curator insight, January 28, 5:34 AM

Brief and clear! Worth taking a glance!

Siri Anderson's curator insight, February 1, 9:14 AM

What if these were stats instead about "number of children immunized," "mentoring hours," "released prisoners education opportunities." sigh

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Key Takeaway from IMS's "Engaging patients through social media" Report

Key Takeaway from IMS's "Engaging patients through social media" Report | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Is healthcare ready for empowered and digitally demanding patients?  That is the question posed by IMS via their newest report “Engaging patients through social media”.  It’s a good report and supports what I learned over a years worth of research.  Here are the key findings..

Due to patient trust in clinicians and the broad reach of social media, healthcare professionals (HCPs) are in a prime position to drive better healthcare outcomes through social media.

 

For the healthcare industry, it is becoming increasingly important to be able to react quickly and decisively to events on social media.  Mid-sized, specialized and consumer care companies are leading the change from uni-directional broadcasting of information to an engaging and relationship-orientated online conversation. However, in general, the industry needs to become less risk averse to new engagements with stakeholders to remain relevant in the overallhealthcare discussion.

 

Read more: http://worldofdtcmarketing.com/key-takeaways-engaging-patients-social-media-ims/social-media-and-healthcare/


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41 percent of patients say social media affects hospital choice

41 percent of patients say social media affects hospital choice | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

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eMedToday's curator insight, September 4, 2013 8:15 PM

interesting facts.

 

One conclusion is that hospitals still do not use social media much

nrip's comment, September 5, 2013 2:22 AM
Yes...many hospitals fear regulations. The few that are using social media are using it very restrictively. Most of the hospitals which are using social networks do so as an extension of their website and bulletin board
Danielle Swift's curator insight, January 10, 8:36 AM

Interesting stat andits implications about communication with patients.

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Mobile Technology and App Use by Physicians (Poll by Sermo)

Mobile Technology and App Use by Physicians (Poll by Sermo) | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

A bias persists that doctors don’t use technology enough, particularly social media and apps.  A Poll by Sermo however shows that while some doctors are reluctant to enter the digital pool, once they adopt, they adopt enthusiastically. Doctors are open to adopting more technology to manage their practices and they embrace medical reference apps.

 

The most popular smart phone for physicians is the iPhone according to MedCrunch. A few top apps are listed below

 

Medscape.  Used by over 3 million doctors, nurses and medical students worldwide, Medscape is big.  You can use it for medical news, clinical reference to things like drugs, diseases, conditions and procedures, and even provides medical education.

 

EpocratesRx.   This app is popular for drug interactions, research, Pill ID and medicine calculators.   The lite version is free, but you can purchase the full version for $160.

 

NeuroMind is a great app for neurologists, neurosurgeons and med students.  It provides basic safety checklist requirements via the World Health Organization, and has “interactive clinical decision support.”  It is the number one neuro app with over 140,000 downloads.

 

Original: http://blog.sermo.com/2013/11/06/sermo-poll-mobile-technology-and-app-use-by-physicians/


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Brian Bernstein's curator insight, November 7, 2013 9:28 AM

Doctyors are enthusiatic about mHealth and it's advantage for eficient clinical application.  Now the ball is in the hand of the market to produce quality tools that are useful to the practitioner. 

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Wikipedia is a pharma marketing issue

Wikipedia is a pharma marketing issue | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

In a previous post on this blog, Catch on to content marketing, I wrote that Pharma’s content-marketing opportunity is to make sure that when a doctor or a patient goes searching for health information that the right content is there waiting for them. In the same post I quoted Dr Candice O’Sullivan of Australia’s Wellmark agency describing Pharma as “an industry well used to the rigours of consistently producing high-quality content.”

 

And yet, millions of patients and doctors still go to Wikipedia every month for the answers to their questions. I think that’s what’s known on the internet as a #Fail.


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Andrew Spong's curator insight, October 15, 2013 7:28 AM

We have to keep plugging away at this issue for a number of reasons, but the principal one resides in Peter Houston's last paragraph.

 

Try finding a search term on a molecule where Wikipedia isn’t in the top three results (and it’s usually the first).

 

Regardless of what one thinks of the quality of Wikipedia entries (which are usually at least moderate-to-good, and improving all the time), the fact is that every community of interest in the health conversation uses Wikipedia all the time due to the simple fact that *it’s where search leads us*.

 

It has been suggested (http://stwem.com/2012/06/13/an-open-letter-to-pharma-please-employ-a-wikipedian-2/) that every pharma company should employ a Wikipedian to ensure that the information contained in *all* Wikimedia content repositories (not just Wikipedia) is fair, accurate, and compliant.

 

The task is to ‘take promotion out, and put fair balanced, comprehensive information in’. To suggest that to do so could put a company in breach is ludicrous on this basis.

 

I go further than this to suggest that each pharma Wikipedian should curate the information Wikipedia contains about *every drug it (or its subsidiaries and acquisitions) has ever brought to market*, not because it is obliged to do so, but because it foregrounds the sum total of the contribution it has made to human health, usually for good, but also occasionally for bad.

 

Why do this?

 

Not to self-praise, nor as a mea culpa, raking over the past, but rather: to indirectly remind Wikipedia users (i.e. every with access to the Internet) of a given company’s work. Building trust in its activities, manifesting its subject authority on the drugs it has brought to market, creating awareness, diminishing prejudice, and providing evidence of its desire to align the success of its business with its desire to do social good.

Sven Awege's curator insight, October 16, 2013 9:09 AM

Once again Andrew has some really good questions we should all be asking, and a great vision and understanding in this area.

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Pharma and Social Media - Comfy Bedfellows: Boehringer, AstraZeneca, & Janssen Get It On!

Pharma and Social Media - Comfy Bedfellows: Boehringer, AstraZeneca, & Janssen Get It On! | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

This article reviews social media breakthroughs by Boehringer, AstraZeneca, & Janssen. (Pharma and Social Media - Comfy Bedfellows: Boehringer, AstraZeneca, & Janssen Get It On!


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45% of online U.S. adults with a chronic condition say the Internet is essential to management

45% of online U.S. adults with a chronic condition say the Internet is essential to management | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Health engagement online deepening at a time when consumers are expected to take a greater role in their care

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eMedToday's curator insight, October 11, 2013 8:32 PM

“We’ve hit an inflection point in the way consumers use the internet for health,” said Rory Stanton, Consumer Insights Analyst at Manhattan Research. “They are going beyond seeking-information to using tools and services to manage the day-to-day aspects of care. That’s good news in this post–healthcare reform environment, in which digital engagement of consumers for example via patient portals and telehealth will be a key to success.”

Allison Emma Schizkoske's curator insight, October 11, 2013 10:29 PM

This number acually suprises me. I would think that the number of people who say the internet is essential would be higher. 

Alfred O'Neill's curator insight, October 14, 2013 9:30 PM

Personalized medcreate ano Conneted Health should make people with chronic illnesses more reliant; it is a tool made for them

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Seeing Is Believing: Infographics Revolutionizing The Patient Experience

Seeing Is Believing: Infographics Revolutionizing The Patient Experience | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

By: Nicole Fisher and Ben Heubl Infographics and visualizations are hugely popular in all cultures, and there is unlimited opportunity to use them in a complex field like health care.


Via Olivier Delannoy
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Deirdre Bonnycastle's curator insight, August 27, 2:30 PM

What a great tool for patient health advocacy

kenza's curator insight, August 27, 4:16 PM

A picture is worth a thousand words .....:)

ChemaCepeda's curator insight, August 30, 4:32 AM

La infografía, un excelente aliado a la hora de hacer educación para la salud 

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Using social media effectively in healthcare

Using social media effectively in healthcare | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Social media is now seen as a tool with potential in healthcare leadership, and some of the online learning at the NHS Leadership Academy is devoted to this.


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Older internet users demand digital health services

Older internet users demand digital health services | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Growing numbers of senior citizens are seeking digital options for managing their health services remotely

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Dr Martin Wale's curator insight, February 13, 10:58 AM

Our experience suggests that many older people expect services on line, but delivery, particularly from physicians, may lag.

Dr Martin Wale's curator insight, February 13, 11:03 AM

Although many tech-savvy older patients are expecting online resources for managing their health, supply may lag.

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9 Tools to Discover Influencers in Your Industry

9 Tools to Discover Influencers in Your Industry | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
The tide of influence hunting on the web is rising beyond public relations and social media to digital marketing at large. In particular, there's growing

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Social Media: Have We Reached the Tipping Point?

Social Media: Have We Reached the Tipping Point? | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

Has tipping point for social media in pharma finally arrived? By Rio Longacre and David Mun, with special thanks to Timothy Moore.

It’s no big secret the pharmaceutical industry lags way behind other sectors when it comes to leveraging social media to meet business objectives. A big reason for this has long been a lack of clear guidelines from FDA.

This month FDA released its draft guidance on the use of “Interactive Promotional Media,” ending several years of speculation and finally providing the industry with substantial guidance on its use of digital media. Though this draft guidance document is currently being distributed for comment purposes only, for the first time it sets out a clear position on tools and technologies that allow for real-time communications and interactions, which includes social media.

In the new guidelines, FDA explains that pharma firms should identify the parts of websites that are interactive and allow for real-time communications, in addition describing its communications within these third-party sites. On a monthly basis, marketers will also need to submit a Form FDA 2253 or Form FDA 2301 for websites that include interactive or real-time communications. To facilitate the submission process, FDA will allow multiple sites and the corresponding documents within a single form — a stark departure from its policies governing static promotional pieces.  ...

Many feel this recent news will mean the proverbial tipping point has been reached, and pharma will finally take the plunge in social media. If so it will certainly be about time, as social media has become pervasive in our lives and, let’s face it, pharma is coming more than fashionably late to this party.

According to a recent Pew Internet study, as of September of last year 73% of online adults use social networking sites. As of 2012, close to three-quarters of Fortune 500 companies were active on Twitter, with more than 80% of executives at these firms believing social media engagement actually led to increased sales. Across industries, an astounding 93% of marketers report they use social media for business.

Despite years of exposure and ample case studies of success from other sectors, however, most pharma companies don’t currently have much of a social media strategy and the vast majority enjoys a rudimentary presence at best. To drive home this fact, in a recent survey more than 90% of 88 executives representing Big Pharma firms said “no” when asked: Does your company engage potential or current customers via social media?

By and large, pharma companies have been extremely conservative in their approach to social media. In addition to a lack of clear guidelines, many firms have kept the medium at arm’s length due mainly compliance concerns related to Adverse Event reporting and potential off-label discussion between reps and patients taking place in a public forum...

While this strategy may have kept stakeholders in compliance happy, generally speaking it has been extremely short-sighted and resulted in significant missed opportunities for the industry in terms of branding and generating goodwill with its customers. If anything, it has helped fuel the perception of an industry more concerned with protecting itself from liability than responding to the needs and concerns of its customers.

On the face of it, pharma is not alone in being heavily regulated. ...

Relative to the US, in the EU pharma companies, in collaboration with regulators, are making greater efforts to leverage social media to monitor adverse events. More specifically, the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) has been created in the aim to build electronic reporting platforms and mobile apps to enable patient reporting of adverse events to regulatory authorities themselves. One can certainly speculate whether these practices will make their way over the Atlantic.

When reviewed in its entirety, it’s not difficult to conclude that compliance issues alone fail to explain fully pharma’s disdain for the medium. If nothing else, a significant reason for the industry’s hands-off approach most likely stems from pervasive skepticism of the channel’s overall benefit for an industry that generally does not usually have direct relationships with its end-customers.

In light of evolving consumer preferences, this argument looks increasingly silly and out of date. Pharma must accept the fact the relationship it enjoys with its customers doesn’t take place in a vacuum. Its customers are also customers of firms in other industries, and consequently bring a high level of service expectations based on these other non-pharma interactions. In terms of providing a positive and rewarding customer experience, pharma is now competing with these brands and must attempt to live up to the lofty standards they set.

And let’s face it, consumers are talking about pharma companies whether they are using social media or not. And believe it or not, pharma’s customers actually want pharma to play a bigger role in social media-sphere. As proof, Manhattan Research recently reported that 42% of online consumers think pharma companies should be involved in online health communities.

Now that social media guidelines are falling into place, in coming months we can probably expect to see a growing shift in mentality across the industry as firms recalibrate their marketing strategy to include a social component. Due to heavy regulations and ever-present compliance concerns, of course, jumping on the social media bandwagon will still require a measured and deliberate approach. But it will require an approach nevertheless...!

 


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rob halkes's curator insight, February 3, 1:24 PM

Noway back now for pharma to engage with the public through several channels AND to define what thier intention is with it.

Simple as that, but not easily implemented. In fact, it relates directly to the way the commercial appriach is redefined. If not, I fear the shale out in the market will hit.. ;-)

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What Patients Will Share Online To Improve Care #epatient

What Patients Will Share Online To Improve Care #epatient | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

A survey of patients with chronic conditions showed that most are willing to share their health information with physicians, other patients, researchers, and drug companies to improve the quality and safety of care. In this respect, a second survey revealed, their attitudes are not too different from those of the general population.

 

The two polls were conducted by PatientsLikeMe (PLM), a social network for patients with medical conditions, and Consumer Reports National Testing and Research Center. PLM surveyed its own members, and Consumer Reports polled a group of consumers that more closely represented the US population. The results of both surveys were reported in an Institute of Medicine (IOM)discussion paper.

 

The PatientsLikeMe survey showed that people with chronic conditions are willing to share their health information if it could help others. Of respondents, 94% would be willing to share to help doctors improve care; 94% would be willing to help other patients like them; and 92% would be willing to share to help researchers learn more about their disease.

 

Read more: http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/electronic-health-records/what-patients-will-share-to-improve-care/d/d-id/1113608


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Ginny Dillon's curator insight, January 29, 10:23 AM

Note: More and more patients are sharing information online.

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WIKIPEDIA TOP SOCIAL MEDIA SITE FOR RX CONVERSION

WIKIPEDIA TOP SOCIAL MEDIA SITE FOR RX CONVERSION | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

ccording to the latest IMS report on social media Wikipedia is the leading single source of healthcare information for patients and healthcare professionals.  Wikipedia is used throughout the entire patient journey, not just at the point of treatment initiation or change in therapy and the correlation between Wikipedia use and medicine use

can be identified for a large number of disease areas. Facebook who?

  


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A pediatrician explains how to make patient engagement a partnership not a dictatorship

A pediatrician explains how to make patient engagement a partnership not a dictatorship | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Dr. Ivor Horn of Children's National Medical Center talked about how physicians can improve patient engagement by encouraging patients to ask questions.

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Social Media by the Numbers: How Social Media Impacts Healthcare

How Social Media Impacts Healthcare and How Physicians Interact with Patients

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Five Ways for Pharma to Read Between the Tweets

Five Ways for Pharma to Read Between the Tweets | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

While buzz on Twitter will never outweigh critical data in a peer-reviewed publication, social media is becoming an important part of our industry’s dialogue. The oncology market is no exception, as insight gleaned from recent Twitter traffic and trends reveals.


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The social tools that doctors favour

The social tools that doctors favour | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it

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Mobile Health Challenge gives startups a chance to win big and fight heart disease

Mobile Health Challenge gives startups a chance to win big and fight heart disease | PharmaTrends | Scoop.it
Novartis’ event provides an incredible opportunity to help more and more startups succeed by building products and services businesses will actually adopt.

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