Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists
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Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists
Innovative, collaborative, interdisciplinary student-centered learning approaches to develop pharmacy students into clinical pharmacists.
Curated by Mary Starry
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Special Report: Could 3D Printing Change the World?

Special Report: Could 3D Printing Change the World? | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
This 15-page special report from ACUS.org answers the question, could 3D printing change the world? The PDF is available for download.
Mary Starry's insight:
Within a few years I see 3D printers having a major role in all areas of education, including pharmacy.
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IHI Open School

IHI Open School | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Mary Starry's insight:

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement provides several series of online courses dealing with patient safety, respect and dignity of the patient, and quality improvement in all healthcare settings. Faculty of some nursing and medical schools are using the courses as required components of their curriculum.  Are any pharmacy colleges doing the same?

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Student Centered Learning Paper

Mary Starry's insight:

This was written in the 90's, but really hits the key concerns that both students and faculty have regarding switching to student centered learning. Too bad that 20 years later we're still discussing how to do this.

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Faculty Focus

Faculty Focus | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it

Teaching Unprepared Students: The Importance of Increasing Relevance

By Kenneth L. Alford, PhD, and Tyler J. Griffin, PhD

 

It is difficult to teach if students are unprepared to learn. In a 2013 Faculty Focus reader survey, faculty were asked to rank their biggest day-to-day challenges. "Students who are not prepared for the rigors of college" and "Students who come to class unprepared" finished in a statistical dead heat as the #1 challenge; roughly 30% of the respondees rated both challenges as "very problematic."

Whether students arrive in your classroom underprepared (that is, their high school educational experience did not prepare them for the rigors of college work) or unprepared (that is, they are not ready to contribute and participate in your course on any given day), the way to help them is still the same.

When approaching classroom challenges, it is helpful to first identify the teaching and learning principles involved and then search for practices that follow from those principles. If you want to increase the level of engagement with underprepared or unprepared students, we have three recommendations:

Increase relevanceIncrease relevanceIncrease relevance

Students who sense a disconnect between what they are learning at college (or in your course) and their future life, as they perceive it, will never engage to the same degree as students who understand the relevant connections between their current learning and their future.

One technique that a teacher can use to increase relevance is to repeatedly ask "So what?" or "Who cares?" If the teacher struggles to answer these questions from their students' perspectives, there is little chance that the students will be able to make the connection on their own. The task of answering these questions does not necessarily need to rest solely on the teacher, though. An engaging teacher will consistently work with students to construct answers to these two questions based on what they are currently studying.

Assignments

Don't just give assignments. You need to help your students understand the relevance and connection to what they are doing now, and what they hope to do in the future. This is the student's, not the teacher's, "big picture" vision. But it is the teacher's responsibility to guide their students through this process. Unprepared and underprepared students will not do this on their own, but there are numerous ways you can help. Here are a few ideas:

Ask your students to respond, in writing, to a "So what?" question as part of each assignment or major topic within your course.Let students have control over course decisions and direction, as appropriate.Guide a class discussion on why this course should matter to them; play a devil's advocate role, if necessary.

Often teachers will wait until the very end of a semester to talk about relevance or relevant connections. That is a mistake. You will have missed a golden opportunity. A better option is to front-load a discussion of relevance in your course. Provide students with relevancy beginning with lesson one. Then throughout your course, each time you introduce a new major topic or section, update and expand on the relevance.

Assessment and Accountability

Effective teachers do not rely on only one form of assessment when helping underprepared or unprepared students. Begin by assessing where students are, and then find appropriate methods to help students reach the next level of ability and motivation. That process continues by degrees until they reach their educational degree.

It has been our experience that students who are held accountable to themselves, to peers, to teams, and to faculty expectations are more likely to find the motivation to complete required work and succeed as students. That accountability must be:

Attainable. If you give unreasonable expectations, you will probably only increase students' unpreparedness and decrease their motivation—but the bar must continue to be raised throughout the semester incrementally, as appropriate.Firm. You must have standards. Mercy should not be allowed to rob justice, or you run the risk of losing credibility—contributing to increased unpreparedness.Measurable. Students need to clearly understand when they have met your expectations in an objective way.

As a teacher, it is essential to remember that you are not teaching lessons or subjects, you are teaching students, real people. Consequently, the degree to which you win the hearts and minds of your students is the degree to which you can motivate them to achieve in your class and throughout their college experience. Your positive effect on students can benefit them in all of their courses—not just yours and not just this one semester. What we do as teachers matters in the lives of our students. Let's help them become lifelong learners.

Dr. Kenneth L. Alford is an associate professor at Brigham Young University and a retired U.S. Army colonel. Dr. Tyler J. Griffin is an assistant professor at Brigham Young University.


Via Lynnette Van Dyke, juandoming
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:47 AM

Relevance, relevance, relevance!  Works at the secondary level, too!

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Student-Centered Graduate Teaching

Student-Centered Graduate Teaching | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Most academics dream of teaching doctoral seminars. Why do we spend so little time thinking about how to do it well?
Mary Starry's insight:

Sounds like very little research has been done on student-centered teaching in graduate school.

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Overseas Health Programs Let Some Students Do Too Much, Too Soon

Overseas Health Programs Let Some Students Do Too Much, Too Soon | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
The number of students going abroad to study health disciplines has tripled in the last 10 years, but guidelines for such programs have lagged behind.
Mary Starry's insight:

As more and more pharmacy students participate in overseas healthcare programs, making sure they are properly supervised and only participating in activities they would be legally able to do in the United States becomes important, not just for the student but for the college as well.  Other colleges of pharmacy may want to consider having students complete the  University of Minnesota's free online course that addresses these issues.

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Are We in a Medical Education Bubble Market? — NEJM

Are We in a Medical Education Bubble Market? — NEJM | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Perspective from The New England Journal of Medicine — Are We in a Medical Education Bubble Market? (Are We in a Medical Education Bubble Market?
Mary Starry's insight:

Unfortunately, as the graphs show, the pharmacy education bubble will likely burst before the medical education bubble.  We need to become realistic about what our students will be able to earn in the future when determining pharmacy education costs.

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The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education - Best Practices for Implementing Team-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education

The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education - Best Practices for Implementing Team-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Mary Starry's insight:

An excellent article on the basic components of team based learning and then specifically the key requirements for each of those components to work the way they should.  Faculty who try to utilize only one or two components should not expect the robust learning experience for students that comes from full utilization of the process. Great insights for both individual faculty and for faculty teams.

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What is a Flipped Classroom. Plus the educator guide to Flipped Classroom

What is a Flipped Classroom. Plus the educator guide to Flipped Classroom | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it

ProProfs presents you this info-graphic that introduces the concept of flipped classrooms. It offers you information on how teachers and students respond to this new idea of learning.

Also, you may want to check The Educators’ Guide to Flipped Classroom, where you will find answer on how does a flipped classroom contribute to student learning, the top benefits and disadvantages of a flipped classroom, and last but not least, how to successfully Flip your classroom.

Finally, I highly encourage you to check:

Progressive Education: The Rising Power Of Student Voice

Read many current educational articles or twitter feeds, and it becomes pretty clear that progressive educationalists are gaining voice. Project based, constructivist, experiential, problem solving curriculum is lauded and promoted at every turn, and thankfully so. Learning becomes deeper and more meaningful when students participate in knowledge building. However, there are a few educationalists who are really pushing and disrupting the boundaries of progressive education. They are those who believe in student generated content.

A strategy for creating a School e-learning culture

Education is constantly changing the way students learn and how instructors teach. Technology is often the driving force behind many of the world’s changes and innovations. In education, creating an e-learning culture is more about developing and tweaking what already exists, sharing a common vision, and doing things a little differently. The purpose of this article is to identify and outline a strategy for creating an e-learning culture within a school system ready to step away from traditional teaching.

The Concept of Individualized Learning Plans in eLearning

Individualized Learning Plans constitute a user-specific learning program or strategy that resembles a mapped academic plan, reflecting each learner’s unique set of strengths, weaknesses, goals, needs, abilities, preferences, and interests. It constitutes an educational technique, undoubtedly easier to implement in the field of eLearning.

- See more at: http://elearninginfographics.com/what-is-a-flipped-classroom-infographic-plus-the-educator-guide-to-flipped-classroom/#sthash.wFzpidoK.dpuf


Via Edumorfosis
Mary Starry's insight:

Great information if you're just starting to work with the flipped classroom approach.

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The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education - Student and Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Recording in a Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum

The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education - Student and Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Recording in a Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
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The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education - Peer-Led Team Learning in an Online Course on Controversial Medication Issues and the US Healthcare System

The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education - Peer-Led Team Learning in an Online Course on Controversial Medication Issues and the US Healthcare System | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Mary Starry's insight:

U of Minnesota College of Pharmacy successfully offered a completely on-line course that incorporated on-line weekly discussions, reflections and a final project. Peer assessment was a major component of the assessment process, lightening the workload on faculty. Sounds very interesting and something other college faculty could realistically do.

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Avoiding Information Overload: Remembering Course Goals

Avoiding Information Overload: Remembering Course Goals | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
In more than 20 years of teaching, I have learned that too much information frustrates rather than inspires students. Today, however, with a few clicks of the computer mouse, any teacher can retrieve an overabundance of information.
Mary Starry's insight:

This is a huge stumbling block for clinical faculty in pharmacy colleges.  They have so much expertise in their specialty area that they find it hard to keep the focus on the basic starting blocks for their topic.  Starting with realistic specific objectives and then structuring content to meet those objectives would be more effective. We want our students to know all the things we've learned from years of experience and end up leaving them in confusion instead.

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The Harvard Classroom, Digitized | News | The Harvard Crimson

The Harvard Classroom, Digitized | News | The Harvard Crimson | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
RT @jryoung: Harvard students express complaints about 'flipped classroom' experiments: http://t.co/bw0jjffW3Z (Harvard Crimson)
Mary Starry's insight:

The Harvard classes addressed were not just "flipped" but also became part of the HarvardX large MOOC approach, so several changes at once.  Harvard is doing research on student impact of the flipped approach. Will be interesting to see results.

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TILE for STEM

TILE for STEM | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Mary Starry's insight:

This professor in the College of Engineering flipped her TILE classroom this fall and is pleased with the results. She's developed a special workshop this November for STEM faculty  to share her active learning approaches.

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FDA Publication on Personalized Medicine

Mary Starry's insight:

This new publication from the FDA addresses personalized medicine and pharmacogenomics, both historically and in terms of what we will see in the future.  There is a nice section on how genetic tests and then the medications to treat the condition tested for are being developed together.  Lots of graphs and charts.  Looks useful both as a resource for faculty, or as an extra resource to provide students.

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What Makes Service-Learning Unique: Reflection and Reciprocity

What Makes Service-Learning Unique: Reflection and Reciprocity | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Let’s start out by defining our terms. The definition of service-learning differentiates it from volunteering and old-fashioned community service.
Mary Starry's insight:

This excerpt is from a white paper the site editor is promoting for purchase, so realize it's a sales pitch! 

 

However, it was interesting how the authors approach reflection as the key component throughout service learning experiences that differentiate them from volunteer work or community service.  While many pharmacy colleges utilize service learning and writing reflections a couple times a year on them, this approach would have reflection as a key component of each service learning activity.

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Optimal Video Length for Student Engagement | edX

Optimal Video Length for Student Engagement | edX | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
@eschmidt2010 @janetr88 It's been proven that the optimal video length for learning 6 minutes or less. http://t.co/4mLWTvBHi7
Mary Starry's insight:

This data is from edX from the large on-line MOOC courses. However, as we look at videotaping for "flipped classes" I think the data can also be applicable. Basically once your video lecture gets longer than about 6 to 9 minutes, the median amount of time students spend watching the video gets progressively smaller until videos longer than 15 minutes are only watched a median of 2 to 4 minutes compared to about 6 minutes for the videos in the 6 to 9 minute length. This data matches up with the old adage that you really only have students attention for about the first 10 minutes of a lecture.

 

So we need to keep the key concepts short and to the point!

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OCR to Text to Speech ~ Around the Corner-MGuhlin.org:

OCR to Text to Speech ~ Around the Corner-MGuhlin.org: | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it

by Miguel Guhlin

 

"I'd like to find a way to scan text, then have that text read to the student." Isn't it great to have these kinds of questions that just wander in?

"While there are a variety of computer programs available for optical character recognition (OCR), I had only encountered this on the PaperPort Notes app. That process, while fine for me, wouldn't work well for the intended use.

 

"Voxdox is a new free text-to-speech app, available now foriphone, android and tablet that will read out any form of text for you in your choice of human voice. 

 

"With Voxdox you can convert files, papers, articles, contracts and even full-length books to quality speech in over 20 languages, and then share them with your friends, class-mates and colleagues using Voxbox, the app’s integrated social database. 

 

"Voxbox has already become the first choice solution for thousands of people around the world for sharing information in the fields of business and academia. By using Voxbox, your networks can find you in seconds and download high quality audio files generated from your text as well as the text itself. After downloading the text they have chosen, all that is left to do is press "play" and it will be read to them in one of a range of human voices."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This is fantastic! You can have your computer read back to you, out loud, any printed document -- even a pdf. For free! Outstanding.

 


Via Jim Lerman
Mary Starry's insight:

Sounds like a great way to have someone else read journal articles or other text based information to you while you drive or walk. Could see usefulness for both faculty and students.

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3 Powerful Apps For Mobile PDF Creation - Edudemic

3 Powerful Apps For Mobile PDF Creation - Edudemic | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
If you don't have a scanner handy (or a scanner period) then one of these mobile pdf creation apps should save you a lot of time and trouble! (RT @Edubeat: 3 Powerful Apps For Mobile PDF Creation: If you don't have a scanner handy (or a...
Mary Starry's insight:

Any of these three apps would be useful!

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Education 3.0: 'Learning Psychology' -- Embracing Better Ways to Teach | Innovation Insights | Wired.com

Education 3.0: 'Learning Psychology' -- Embracing Better Ways to Teach | Innovation Insights | Wired.com | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Image: USDAgov/Flickr In case you forgot my definition from last time, Education 3.0 is the confluence of three crucial education elements: Neuroscienc (RT @RitwikSwain: @SchoolsImprove @educationgovuk We must employ this knowledge to improve #education...
Mary Starry's insight:

How do we get more pharmacy faculty interested in learning and practicing new approaches to student learning?  A tenured faculty member walked into my office the other day and saw I was reading about the "Flipped Classroom". He asked me what was the difference between me and the rest of the faculty on our floor. I answered, "A PhD." and he replied, "No, the time to spend reading about education. The rest of us are working on our research in any spare moment we can find."   Is there a way to get all pharmacy faculty interested in learning approaches? 

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46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom

46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom

 

 

Infographics are interesting–a mash of (hopefully) easily-consumed visuals (so, symbols, shapes, and images) and added relevant character-based data (so, numbers, words, and brief sentences).

The learning application for them is clear, with many academic standards–including the Common Core standards–requiring teachers to use a variety of media forms, charts, and other data for both information reading as well as general fluency. It’s curious they haven’t really “caught on” in schools considering how well they bridge both the old-form textbook habit of cramming tons of information into a small space, while also neatly overlapping with the dynamic and digital world.


Via Dennis T OConnor
Mary Starry's insight:

Lots of interesting tools I haven't tried.  There are a lot of complex healthcare topics that might be better understood as an infographic.

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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, November 9, 2013 3:35 PM

creating infographics is easy using these sites. The most important thing is to do quality research first.

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, November 10, 2013 9:26 AM

gosto de ferramentas que facilitem o aprndizado visualmente. Para quem compartilha da ideia, mas nao tem o dom grafico como eu...pode recorrer a algumas estrategias prontas...

Filipe Cálix's curator insight, November 22, 2013 6:54 PM

Sempre apelativos os infográficos são uma boa ferramenta para trabalho na sala de aula. Esta lista é extensa e apresenta muito boas sugestões. A explorar.

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The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education - Correlation Between Active-Learning Coursework and Student Retention of Core Content During Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education - Correlation Between Active-Learning Coursework and Student Retention of Core Content During Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences | Pharmacy Education for Clinical Pharmacists | Scoop.it
Mary Starry's insight:

Great to see that faculty were able to correlate movement from lecture based to active learning approaches in a series of therapeutics classes to increased retention of the core content covered. Exactly what we hope to obtain from active learning approaches!

 

 

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GUIDE TO THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE BY Bertalan Mesko

Dr Bertalan Mesko, Medical Futurist

 

 

 


Via Denise Silber, Deirdre Bonnycastle
Mary Starry's insight:

Dr. Mesko has developed a very interesting infographic on where technology has already moved us and where it is moving in the future in terms of diagnostics, treatment, monitoring, collaboration with others, patient communication, etc. He then provides a nice summary of the current status of these technological tools.  Glad to see there's still hope for the Star Trek Tricoder!

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Denise Silber's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:00 PM

More great content from Berci.

Enjoy the easy, well-organized text and meet him in person at Doctors 2.0 & You Paris June 5-6.

Sign up now!.

 

 

 
Denise Silber's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:50 PM

Lisez le remarquable nouveau rapport du futuriste médical, Berci Mesko et venez en parler avec lui à Doctors 2.0 & You en juin 2014

 

 
Denise Silber's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:52 PM

Great content from Berci Mesko. Read it and  come meet him in Paris June 5-6, 2014 Doctors 2.0 & You

 
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FDA introduces e-learning program about untruthful, misleading drug ads | Drug Store News

Mary Starry's insight:

The FDA is encouraging healthcare programs to incorporate these materials into their curriculum.  Every healthcare professional has worked with at least one patient who has been mislead into wasting money on these misleading products.

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Laptop multitasking hinders classroom learning for both users and nearby peers

RT @marklipton: Laptop multitasking hinders classroom learning for both users and nearby peers http://t.co/OfYRCpRot8 #edtech
Mary Starry's insight:

Not surprised by these results, but good to have data affirming our suspicions. Unfortunately most students will say they are very capable of multitasking and still pick up the salient points of the lecture.

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