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Pharmaceutics_R&D
Pharmaceutical companies R&D specifically in neuroscience, CNS disease, pain and electrophysiology
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Research and development: Outsourcing trends

US contract research organizations are multiplying to meet drug-makers' outsourcing needs.

 

US drug-makers are outsourcing more and more of their research and development, mainly to contract research organizations, according to figures released in July by the US National Science Foundation (NSF). The shift could be good news for researchers seeking positions in industry. In 1991, pharmaceutical companies spent about US$800 million on external research and development, but that skyrocketed to $13 billion in 2011, says John Jankowski, head of research and development statistics at the NSF. That growth outstrips that of any other sector. In 1991, industrial extramural research spending totalled $3.3 billion, but by 2011, spending had risen to $25.3 billion for domestic companies alone. Pharmaceutical firms' share of that total was 23% in 1991, but ballooned to 51% by 2011. Jankowski says that much of the increase comes from the outsourcing of clinical trials. The number of US contract research organizations has risen to match the demand, from around 800 in 2000 to more than 3,100 by the end of 2011, according to the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development in Boston, Massachusetts. - Nature 512, 106, 06 August 2014

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Why all pharmaceutical research should be made open access

Why all pharmaceutical research should be made open access | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it

The government wants to make all publicly funded research available – but the same must be demanded of pharmas also

I recently had lunch with as staunch an advocate for open access as you'll ever meet (I won't name him, because it would be rude to attribute casual remarks to him without permission). We were talking about plans to mandate free and open publication of publicly funded scientific research. In the USA, there's the Federal Public Research Act, and in the UK, there's the coalition government's announcement that publicly funded research should be made available at no cost, under a Creative Commons licence that permits unlimited copying. (...) by Cory Doctorow, The Guardian, 20 november 2012

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Where, Oh Where, Has All The Pharma Talent Gone? // Pharmalot

Where, Oh Where, Has All The Pharma Talent Gone? // Pharmalot | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it

File this under ‘sad irony.’ Now that the pharmaceutical industry has tossed thousands of people overboard during the last decade – an estimated 150,000 or so just since 2009 – a slight majority of drugmakers complain that it has become increasingly difficult to find the right talent and most worry they will not have access to the people they need to hire, according to a report from PricewaterhouseCoopers. (...) - By Ed Silverman, PharmalotFebruary 5th, 2013

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The Biotech Industry is facing a Patent Cliff and True Disruption – Biotech Part 3 of 6

The Biotech Industry is facing a Patent Cliff and True Disruption – Biotech Part 3 of 6 | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it

In February of 2011, Pfizer announced the closing of its R&D center in Sandwich, Kent, United Kingdom.  That center of excellence was a core part of the company’s drug development program.  It employed 2,400 people, covered 80 acres and became known as the “the home of Viagra.”  While Viagra was home grown and not venture backed, the closure of the Pfizer campus signaled a paradigm shift migrating big pharma, in-house R&D to satellite / outsourced drug discovery.  Many of these companies are virtual and have a lean management, contractors doing much of the work and VCs playing a critical role forming and managing these companies.  R&D spending for the pharmaceutical industry fell to $61bn in 2011, down from $68bn in 2010, down again from $70bn in 2009 and 2008 annually (...) -  by Andrew Romans, The Founders Club, 19 December 2012

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Trends and opportunities for pharmaceutical companies: Pharma 2020

Trends and opportunities for pharmaceutical companies: Pharma 2020 | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it

Predicting the future trends of the pharmaceutical, biotech and life sciences industry and the decisions pharma companies need to make to capitalise on opportunities. (...) - PwC

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Investment relief for biotech sector

Investment relief for biotech sector | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it
Public markets provide cash injection for struggling field.


Robert Forrester gets a little giddy when he talks about the day his company went public. The otherwise understated chief operating officer of Verastem, a small biotechnology company developing drugs to target cancer stem cells, chuckles and bounces in his chair as he recounts key strategic decisions along the way to the company’s initial public offering (IPO) on 26 January, which raised US$55 million. (...) - by Heidi Ledford, Nature, 14 November 2012

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The changing face of corporate venturing in biotechnology

The changing face of corporate venturing in biotechnology | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it
Corporate venture funds are playing an increasingly important role in supporting life science commercialization. 

Corporate venturing—the practice of establishing a unit of a corporation with the mandate to make strategic investments in entrepreneurial ventures—has emerged as one of the most prominent strategies for opening up innovation to external ideas and knowledge in the life sciences. Venture arms of pharmaceutical and large biotech companies leverage capital surplus generated through traditional revenue streams to create options for future product pipelines, enable access to innovative compounds and share the costs of risky early stage development with external partners. (...) - von Krogh G et al.Nature Biotechnology 30, 911–915 (2012)

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New cures sought from old drugs

New cures sought from old drugs | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it
Researchers to re-examine compounds shelved by industry.


Progeria is a rare, lethal disease that ages children so rapidly that they seem to be 80 years old when they are just 10. So patients and families celebrated the news last week of the first therapeutic success against the disease — as did advocates of the notion that abandoned drugs can rise again. A clinical trial has shown improved symptoms in children with the disease who used lonafarnib (L. B. Gordon Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA http://doi.org/jfz; 2012), a drug developed by Merck in the 1990s that failed against its original target, head and neck cancer. (...) - by Meredith Wadman, Nature News, 3 October, 2012

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The biotech industry with Rob Carlson

The biotech industry with Rob Carlson | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it
In this interview, I speak to Dr. Rob Carlson, a Principal at Biodesic, an engineering and strategic consulting firm in Seattle that provides services to governments and corporations around the globe. At the broadest level, Dr. Carlson is interested in the future role of biology as a human technology. He is the author of the book Biology is Technology: The Promise, Peril, and New Business of Engineering Life, published in 2010 by Harvard University Press; it received the PROSE award for the Best Engineering and Technology Book of 2010 and was named to the Best Books of 2010 lists by writers at both The Economist and ForeignPolicy.com. Carlson is a frequent international speaker and has served as an advisor to such diverse organisations as The Hastings Center, the PICNIC Design Festival, the UN, the OECD, the US Government, and companies ranging in size from start-ups to members of the Fortune 100. Carlson earned a doctorate in Physics from Princeton University in 1997. (...) - by Julie Gould, Nature Jobs Blog, 18 April 2014
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Legendary Drug Industry Executives Warn U.S. Science Cuts Endanger The Future - Forbes

Legendary Drug Industry Executives Warn U.S. Science Cuts Endanger The Future - Forbes | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it

Biomedical research and innovation are crucial to improving America’s health, global competitiveness, and economic growth, as both President Obama and House Majority Leader Cantor have stressed in recent weeks. In the wake of the sequester, and as the President and Congress move ahead with budget negotiations, now is the time for both parties to translate into action their bipartisan commitment to our nation’s science investment by restoring the budgets of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other science agencies that support basic biomedical research in universities and medical schools in all 50 states – an area of federal spending that is highly productive and a critical investment. (...) - by Marc Tessier-Lavigne, President, The Rockefeller University and former Chief Scientific Officer, Genentech Inc. (left); P. Roy Vagelos, Chairman, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, and Retired Chairman and CEO, Merck & Co., Inc. (center); and Elias ZerhouniPresident R&D Sanofi and former Director of the National Institutes of Health., Forbes, 03/06/2013

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Will "Robust Pipeline" Yield More New Drugs?

Will "Robust Pipeline" Yield More New Drugs? | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it

Biopharmaceutical companies are touting their huge investment in R&D, which has filled the drug pipeline with more potential first-in-class medicines, including orphan drugs, personalized medicines and new therapies based on novel scientific strategies. A report by the Analysis Group for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) documents more than 5,000 new medicines in the pipeline globally, many for untreated diseases and life-threatening conditions. The promise is that this more robust pipeline will lead to more new critical therapies for patients.

Yet, the data also reveals that most of these therapies are in early stages of development:  less than 1000 of the 5400 products in clinical development have reached stage III, and only 82 are headed for market following approval by the Food and Drug Administration. The attrition from phase II to phase III remains very high despite a range of scientific advances and regulatory improvements. Of nearly 3000 new molecular entities (NMEs) to treat cancer, only 288 have reached stage III clinical trials, and only  a handful make it to market. Therapies for infectious diseases seem to have a higher success rate, with about 700 investigational projects yielding 22 recent approvals. Certainly a higher “early kill” rate may be a sign of progress in the  risky world of pharma R&D, where a key goal is to avoid costly phase III studies that won’t pass muster with FDA. The current study doesn’t provide the historical data that could tell more about whether pharma R&D is becoming more productive, but there doesn’t seem to much evidence of progress.

A more telling sign is the recent rise in FDA’s approval numbers for NMEs, reaching almost 40 in 2012 and still providing steady good news for sponsors. The promise is that more INDs eventually will yield more new approved medicines. “There are no guarantees” from a stronger and more diverse pipeline, but the study reveals the “depth of possibilities,” observed Genia  Long of the Analysis Group in a PhRMA webinar. However, it also is important for pharma to reduce the overall cost of developing new drugs, and that will require more informative early stage research strategies that efficiently separate potential winners from likely losers. Researchers are making progress in developing treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, pointed out Eli Lilly CEO John Lechleiter, acknowledging that success “will require longer, more expensive studies to show benefit for patients.”

The PhRMA report aims to demonstrate to the public and policymakers the high value of biopharmaceutical R&D and the importance of continuing government support for FDA programs and research funded by the National Institutes of Health. It also highlights the value – and the need to pay for – new therapies to treat rare diseases and conditions that currently lack effective treatment. Ultimately, these new, costly research endeavors could lead to cures and preventives for cancer, Alzheimer’s and other devastating illnesses that affect millions. But the costs for individual patients may be enormous, and it remains to be seen if public and private health programs will pay for them.

 


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Chaturika Jayadewa
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Hervé Gisserot élu Président du Leem

Hervé Gisserot élu Président du Leem | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it
MyPharma Editions, 4 décembre 2012
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Hervé Gisserot a été élu mardi 4 décembre 2012 par le Conseil d’Administration du Leem (Les Entreprises du Médicament) à la présidence de l’organisation professionnelle. Les résultats de cette élection seront officiellement proclamés à l’Assemblée Générale du 12 décembre 2012. Le nouveau président prendra ses fonctions le 1er janvier 2013. (...)

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PwC sees golden era for pharmas that dump the junk, innovate - FiercePharma

Pharma players that ditch their stale culture can thrive in tough world. 

The future of pharma may look pretty bleak over the next few years. The patent cliff has laid to waste blockbusters while too many drugs that were to replace them have withered on the Phase III trial vine. Productivity is low and pipelines are full of high-risk molecules with small potential markets. Big Pharma is getting the screws put to it by payers and emerging markets may not be the panacea many predict, but things look great. (...) - by Eric Palmer, FiercePharma, November 20, 2012

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A CRO Tries To Create Part Of Its Workforce

A CRO Tries To Create Part Of Its Workforce | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it

In a bid to handcraft its workforce Parexel International, one of the larger clinical research organizations, recently struck a deal with Salem State University to offer a certificate program in clinical trial management. Although the CRO has developed similar programs abroad over the past decade, this is the first time the effort will take place in the US. The move comes as CRO’s attempt to fine tune their appeal to the pharmaceutical industry amid growing scrutiny of clinical trial conduct and oversight. We spoke with Albert Siu, vp of learning and development at Parexel, about the hopes for the program and how it will work… (...) - By Ed SilvermanPharmalot, November 7th, 2012

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EyeBrain lève 3,3 millions d’euros pour développer sa force commerciale

EyeBrain lève 3,3 millions d’euros pour développer sa force commerciale | Pharmaceutics_R&D | Scoop.it

EyeBrain, société basée à Ivry-sur-Seine et qui développe des marqueurs du fonctionnement cérébral pour les maladies neurologiques et psychiatriques, vient d’annoncer une levée de fonds de 3,3 millions d’euros lors de son deuxième tour de table. EyeBrain prévoit d’utiliser les fonds pour développer sa force commerciale, tout en poursuivant ses efforts de R&D.
Cette augmentation de capital est souscrite par Octalfa, Sudinnova et CM-CIC Capital Innovation, trois nouveaux entrants, qui rejoignent les investisseurs historiques, CapDecisif Management et G1JIDF. Lors du premier tour réalisé en 2009 auprès de ces deux fonds, EyeBrain avait levé 1,2 million d’euros. (...) - MyPharma Editions, 9 octobre 2012

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