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The future of engagement for pharma is: disengagement

The future of engagement for pharma is: disengagement | Pharma | Scoop.it

‘While paradoxically, the consumer actively engages much less with [a] brand when they begin to rely upon an application for a particular service[...] we need to learn to see this as a marketing positive. They may clock off from the often tiresome active engagements via our website, but don’t mistake this cold shift in engagement for a drop in loyalty.’

 

The title of the Michael Bayler article from which this post is derived is arresting, but the argument it articulates is less compelling, and the conclusion is wide of the mark from my point of view.

 

Why sound this apologia for the collapse of the precepts of marketing?

 

Why look for ‘marketing positives’ in social environments that are innately hostile to the concepts of ‘marketing’ as they developed in offline contexts?

 

Why not accept that the social web is a postmarketing environment rather than repeatedly trying to reformulate maxims that are antithetical to the expectations and etiquettes of social in every way imaginable?

 

Why enter social environments in such a deterministic manner, and one which would appear designed to make companies unpopular?

 

What fideism supports the leap of faith underpinning the expectation that ‘loyalty’ to a brand (the etiology of which is never adequately defined) should be eroded in settings where attempts to influence directly have corrosive effects?

 

The reason that I found the title interesting in the first place, however, is that it conjures images of the tightrope that healthcare will need to tread in the future: informed by Big Data, but facilitated by networks that may become more focused as ties strengthen, relationships develop, and new matrices of trust, influence and authority emerge.

 

If you do not sit in the middle of these matrices, you will always remain on their margins, struggling to gain purchase, and losing your grip.

 

The social web is paradox: burgeoning volumetrically, yet contracting in terms of engagement opportunities for new entrants as communities coalesce.

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Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster.

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster. | Pharma | Scoop.it

Click on the link above to contact Andrew Spong, Managing Director, STweM Ltd.

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"The question of pharma's social ROI has gone the way of the question of the shape of the planet"

"The question of pharma's social ROI has gone the way of the question of the shape of the planet" | Pharma | Scoop.it

Mark Senak writes in his Eye on FDA blog:

 

"The question of ROI [in pharma's use of social media] has gone the way of the question of the shape of the planet.


It may still be worth having the discussion if for no other reason than to actually get grounded in your goals and objectives.  But in fact, we have all moved on and we are not turning back.


It is probably as much good to ask what the ROI is on social media in the same way you might ask what the ROI was on your press releases, your web site, or the electronic socket in wall.


In the end, it may not be a question about the return on investment as much as the cost of not doing business."

Andrew Spong's insight:

Nicely put.

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More than three-quarters of patients think pharma companies have a responsibility to provide information and services that help patients manage their own health

More than three-quarters of patients think pharma companies have a responsibility to provide information and services that help patients manage their own health | Pharma | Scoop.it

More than three-quarters (76 percent) of patients think pharmaceutical companies have a responsibility to provide information and services that help patients manage their own health.

 

Nearly as many respondents, 74 percent, indicated that the most appropriate time to initiate outreach is when they start making a medication, although half of the respondents are open to receiving assistance after they have begun a course of treatment or are considering switching.

 

The report also indicated that patients are generally very satisfied with patient services when they get them—and are willing to give more personal health information to obtain more relevant services.

 

Of the patients who receive services, a sizable majority (70 to 80 percent) express satisfaction with all the services used.

 

In addition, patients appear to place high importance on services, providing a strong indication that services are viewed as a "should offer" not a "nice to offer" add-on—dependent on the type of medicine or treatment.

 

Patients are also ready and willing to share information in order to receive improved or free services, the survey found.

 

Eighty percent of patients are proactively seeking information about the medicines they are taking, and more than 70 percent seek out information on health care services related to their conditions.

 

Nearly four in 10 (38 percent) want pharmaceutical companies to reach them through social media—a significantly higher percentage than what they want from physicians, pharmacists, friends and family.

 

"There is a clear need for pharmaceutical companies to understand patient communication preferences and customize channels and content to provide relevant customer experiences at scale," the report said.

 


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So we have gone digital; what next?

So we have gone digital; what next? | Pharma | Scoop.it
The digital wave is here to stay, but how well are marketers riding it? A global IBM C-suite study has some interesting insights
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Effective pharma-patient interaction requires credible representation within communities

Effective pharma-patient interaction requires credible representation within communities | Pharma | Scoop.it

Every year, the board game community BoardGameGeek (BGG)  holds an annual convention called BGG.con. It’s pretty much paradise for US unplugged gamers: a library of over 3,500 titles, round-the-clock sessions, vendors, and more.

 

BGG.con is usually held in at the Hyatt Regency Dallas Fort Worth International Airport hotel.

 

Meet Glenn...

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"I want to build a healthcare community..."

"I want to build a healthcare community..." | Pharma | Scoop.it
The immortal phrase that should bring everyone out in a sweat; whether client side or agency side. Building an online community is one of the hardest things to do, not simply in healthcare. It needs considerable investment, time, research, and also a little bit of luck. 

Via Alex Butler
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Mira Alison's curator insight, March 11, 12:40 AM

Of course you have a website now. Make sure that your web pages are loaded with your main keywords, so that they have a natural flow of content . Also make sure that the word can be found somewhere in the titles ( at least your top three )Once you have that all set up , make sure that you have set up the links to those pages through the site pages on the Internet.Read for more information:

http://cuxtomizedfatloss.blogspot.com/p/fat-misfortune-extreme-methodology-to.html
Dr Martin Wale's curator insight, March 14, 1:53 AM

So much to do...

Vigisys's curator insight, March 15, 3:58 AM

Une communauté c'est bien, un réseau de soins numérique c'est mieux, mais le challenge est encore plus grand ! C'est ce à quoi nous nous adressons avec nos projets Indesir.fr et vigidiab.fr. 

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Social media as a research tool in patient behaviour patterns

Social media as a research tool in patient behaviour patterns | Pharma | Scoop.it

Social media in healthcare is most often used to reach out to patients and encourage them to be active, but one research team is taking it to a whole new level by using websites such as Facebook and Twitter to actually conduct research and compile data. The Boston Children’s Hospital and Merck have joined forces to use social media as a tool to better understand insomnia.

 

By using data from Twitter such as tweet content and time, as well as Facebook login times and comments, researchers hope to create a “portrait” of a patient’s daily activities and active times. As Health IT Analyticsexplains, “If the patient is complaining of sleeplessness at three in the morning, for example, when his daily routine requires him to be at work by 9 a.m., the researchers will be able to flag him as a likely candidate for follow-up from a primary care provider.”

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2014: the year of social pharma

2014: the year of social pharma | Pharma | Scoop.it

Prodeep Bose (who I can't find on Twitter, but anyway...) writes:

 

"The central crux of the FDA's ruling suggests that a company’s responsibility is for content posted and not the entirety of the social context. And the intent, if I were to derive one, is to enable—if not empower—pharma to engage in social marketing.

 

In fact, I would suggest that it is the responsibility of pharma to engage and dispel inaccuracies regarding its products with a genuine intent in doing just so, in a responsible manner. And I imagine that the positive thinker on either side of the regulatory fence, whether at FDA or pharma, would see eye to eye on furthering the goal of legitimate information dissemination through the most powerful means of communications in our time—social engagement."

Andrew Spong's insight:

It is the proactive acknowledgment of pharma's moral and ethical responsibility that Prodeep alludes to in the second paragraph that is key here.

 

Regulations are, and always have been, the secondary issue: the desire and intent to participate in a responsible, approvable manner is all that is required.

 

If you're waiting for guidelines to find loopholes, you're not in the right place to use social technologies anyway.

 

As numerous commentators have said on many occasions, the principle obstacles to the industry's adoption of social are internal: a lack of will, understanding, and capability.

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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, February 27, 8:04 AM

pressure is raising to make pharma moving forward in social

Sven Awege's curator insight, February 28, 2:11 AM

Attitude and a real wish to make a difference - regulation is just an excuse. But... I would also challenge that perhaps social media is not always the channel to provide the biggest bang! Upstream clear thinking is critical, while panning for measurement will also ensure that we can build perenniality by demonstrating true engagement that matters on a scale that has impact.

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PMCPA's new digital communications guidance encourages 'proactive use' of Wikipedia by pharma

PMCPA's new digital communications guidance encourages 'proactive use' of Wikipedia by pharma | Pharma | Scoop.it
Andrew Spong's insight:

I'm interpreting the surprisingly opinionated (but in a good way) observation 'otherwise why correct some inaccuracies but not all? ' as the PMCPA saying to pharma: 'it's time to hire someone to curate information about your products on Wikipedia on a full-time basis'.


Yes, there is still some fence-sitting here and I'd have put the entire document through another revision for clarity and precision (there's no room for ambiguity in guidance), but overall: hats off to the PMCPA for moving this issue forward.

 

This is the green light for pharma's use of the most frequently discovered, searched, and cited resource on the Internet.

 

This is an unprecedented opportunity here for pharma's digital laggards to vault over their competitors and move from zeroes to heroes in a single bound

 

Who will jump first?

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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, February 20, 4:31 AM

did you already have a look at the way our products are presented in Wikipedia?

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Six reasons why that app you just spent a chunk of your 2014 budget on is useless

Six reasons why that app you just spent a chunk of your 2014 budget on is useless | Pharma | Scoop.it

Christopher Wasden's (PwC) six principles that drive the adoption of a successful mHealth app:


1. Integration: The app has to be integrated into the lifestyle of the patient and physicians have to integrate it into their workflow.

2. Interoperability: From a technological perspective, apps must share information and work across information technology systems.

3. Intelligence: It can’t just give you the data that you gave it. It needs to give you insights from the data that create changes in your behavior.

4. Social: You have to be able to share the information with a community that supports you in your behavior change.

5. Engaging: It has to be fun to use. You must want to use it and come back time and time again.

6. Outcomes: It has to collect information, show a change in behavior, and deliver better health outcomes.

 

Wasden: "If you look at the majority of apps out there, they don’t fulfill one of my six principles."

Andrew Spong's insight:

Browse the Play Store and take a look at the app you commissioned last year.

 

Note how many times it was installed.

 

Divide the sum you paid by the number of downloads.

 

Pretty depressing, huh?

 

But hey, that was last year, right? "Fool me once," and all that.

 

Unless you've commissioned another app for 2014, that is.

 

If you have, now is the time to ask the agency to which you've just signed off a truckload of money to develop it to refute Wasden's principles in a compelling and quantifiable manner.

 

Then review your break clause and level of service agreement.

 

You can do better things with your money.

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Sven Awege's comment, January 26, 1:26 AM
Can't disagree more Andrew, pharma definitely has it's place at the table, or carry on falling into oblivion in terms of engaging with the stakeholder! But also disagree with the PwC list of criteria - they'll only lead to internal roadblocks!!!! Yes, feeling a bit controversial today!
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Pharma's biggest problem in 2014? Strategy

Pharma's biggest problem in 2014? Strategy | Pharma | Scoop.it

In a PMGroup / Havas Lynx survey of 250 people working in, and for, the pharma industry, 'unclear strategy' was voted the biggest challenge the industry will face with 'digital' in 2014.

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Sven Awege's curator insight, January 23, 2:11 AM

Nice to see these confirmed in a neat table. We type of know these after some years in the industry.

Lilltle comment that I heard recently that resonated, our constant use of the word 'restrictive' when talking about regulations - lets get over thinking about this negatively - Nearly all issues raised are either the law, or simply good ethical behavior. We should understand where the limits are, and for what reason, then get to work on what we can do. From my perspective much of Pharma still has to get a solid grip on doing the easy stuff first, and doing it well. 

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Health app certification: a flawed proposition?

Health app certification: a flawed proposition? | Pharma | Scoop.it

Happtique recently announced the suspension of their App Certification Program after health IT expert Harold Smith, CEO of Monkton Health, disclosed several security flaws in apps he had randomly selected for evaluation from Happtique’s first round of “certified” apps.

 

Coming nearly two years after they announced their intention to create a certification program for health apps, these findings were an embarrassing setback for a program that was intended to help patients and clinicians feel confident about their app selections.

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Jelly: the challenge to pharma of a visually driven, people-powered social search app

Jelly: the challenge to pharma of a visually driven, people-powered social search app | Pharma | Scoop.it

The Play store description:

 

Jelly is a new way to search with pictures and people from your social networks. It's also people helping each other—something that's both meaningful and fun.


Ask questions with images to deepen the context. Crop, reframe, zoom, and draw on your images to get more specific.

 

Jelly works with your existing social networks. In addition to asking, you may find yourself answering questions as well.

 

Questions can be forwarded outside the app so your friends who don't have Jelly can still help. It feels good to help!

 
Andrew Spong's insight:

This has interesting implications for the health conversation from many perspectives.

 

Firstly, if this visually-driven social search platform takes off, it will *blow the doors* off regulatory issues (which, when considered dispassionately, are effectively already moribund for the most part in social contexts).

 

Secondly, the way that Jelly relies upon existing, mature network connections (take a picture; share, and/or ask question of Twitter or facebook followers, who then discuss and/or share in turn) means that those pharma companies who already maintain presences on these networks will immediately find themselves in the middle of a data-rich, visually driven, network-encompassing conversation that they can't back away from.

 

Fascinating...

 

Note: I couldn't find the Jelly app via the Play store, so followed the link embedded in the article you'll find on the redirected page accessed via the title link above (where you'll also find the video depicted in the image above). An iOS version is also available.

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Pharma's current business model 'does not put the patient at the heart of its decision-making', says KPMG

Pharma's current business model 'does not put the patient at the heart of its decision-making', says KPMG | Pharma | Scoop.it

Pharmaceutical companies need to stop simply paying lip-service to patients and radically alter their business models if they are to meet increasing global demand while improving patient outcomes, says KPMG.

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rob halkes's curator insight, Today, 2:03 AM

Indeed the pharma model needs to be build on an comprehensive view on pharma's role, actions and services in the market. See a draft version to this here:
http://www.healthbusinessconsult.com/blog/customer-focus-in-pharma-22/

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More data, better drugs: Genentech, PatientsLikeMe ink groundbreaking research pact

More data, better drugs: Genentech, PatientsLikeMe ink groundbreaking research pact | Pharma | Scoop.it
The five-year agreement is the first broad research collaboration between PatientsLikeMe and a drug company, but it also demonstrates how open-source research and social media are increasingly tapped by companies to get real-world insights into diseases and how patients respond to treatments.
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Chats not charts: a three-step programme for pharmaceutical postmarketing

Chats not charts: a three-step programme for pharmaceutical postmarketing | Pharma | Scoop.it
The air of despondency that is descending over the pharmaceutical industry's use of social media is perverse. It has nothing to do with a putative (and also fictive) absence of interest on the pati...
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Anneliz Hannan's curator insight, April 1, 2:15 AM

Andrew Spong wants  pharma to step up to the plate on pharma social media as the marketers they are. 

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Corporate digital IQ linked to performance

Corporate digital IQ linked to performance | Pharma | Scoop.it

PwC identifies five key capabilities that make a difference in raising a company's digital IQ.

 

They are:

 

Behavior 1: CEO actively champions digital

Behavior 2: Strong CIO-CMO relationship

Behavior 3: Outside-in approach to digital innovation

Behavior 4: Significant New IT Platform investments

Behavior 5: View digital as an enterprise capability  

 

Andrew Spong's insight:

Even the pharma companies who perform relatively (a loaded term) well in digital environments fail at least one of these criteria.

 

Most fail more than one.

 

Some fail all of them.

 

And: I'm probably being generous.

 

N.B. it goes without saying that 'significant new IT platform investment' need not correspond to measurable improvements across measures.

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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, April 1, 8:07 AM

did they attend SPMSD LTA forum?

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Merck's big data healthcare collaborations seek insights for drug development

Merck's big data healthcare collaborations seek insights for drug development | Pharma | Scoop.it
Sachin Jain, the CMIO of Merck's digital health arm talks about big data health insights it hopes to gain from healthcare industry collaborations.
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Sven Awege's curator insight, March 11, 2:46 AM

Another great initiative by Merck here. My question though is that the kinds of outcomes and insights we're talking about might be better managed by a more independent player! Not sure how comfortable patients are about being data-mined by a Pharma company.

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Five things big pharma can learn from the rare disease community

Five things big pharma can learn from the rare disease community | Pharma | Scoop.it

Companies in the rare disease space have learned lessons big pharma can use too:

 

1. Patient engagement starts in clinical trials

2. Silence isn't safe

3. Support must go beyond the brand

4. Don't wait for a crisis

5. True innovation begins with outcomes

Andrew Spong's insight:

A lovely piece by Wendy White from last week. Recommended.

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rob halkes's curator insight, March 6, 1:35 AM

We can guide pharma to innovate, but they must implement it themselves .. ;-)

Gary Monk's curator insight, March 6, 9:00 AM

Interesting article

MyHealthShare's curator insight, March 8, 4:00 AM

Five things big pharma can learn from the rare disease community | http://myhealthshare.org @andrewspong http://sco.lt/...

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Mobile technologies in healthcare today

Mobile technologies in healthcare today | Pharma | Scoop.it
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Pharma Wikipedia corporate pages analysed

Further analysis from Gary Monk.

Andrew Spong's insight:
I'd be interested to know whether the editors Gary IDs are employees of the companies in question, and also why one of them has been blocked (if this is indeed the case).
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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, February 24, 1:49 AM

very interesting wikipedia analysis among pharma behaviour

Gary Monk's comment, February 24, 4:24 AM
Thanks for the share Andrew. Initial analysis it looks like these guys are not Pharma employees in terms of their profiles / sentiment / declared interests. (at least not openly) I plan to do a deeper analysis of these influencers and what sort of changes they are effecting, eg minor/major +ve/-ve etc. It looks like the one user has been blocked for sock puppetry/manipulating via fake accounts
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How do you design video games for health?

How do you design video games for health? | Pharma | Scoop.it

Hopefully, the days of bland patient information and mind-numbingly dull educational videos will soon be behind us. Increasingly, people are recognizing games as a way to better engage patients for educational and therapeutic purposes.


These include mainstream consumer titles like the Wii Fit to specialized applications like laparoscopic surgical simulations and physical rehabilitation. In the past decade, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation — a philanthropy whose aim is to improve healthcare — has provided grants and guidance for Games for Health and related initiatives. Their most recent competition, the Games To Generate Data Challenge, targets population health.

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Mobile is not optional if you want to reach rheumatologists

Mobile is not optional if you want to reach rheumatologists | Pharma | Scoop.it

43% of rheumatologists report they use four digital devices on a regular basis (desktop, laptop, tablet, phone). 32% report they use three devices and 18% report they use two devices.


Only 7% are only using one device

 

Among devices used for professional purposes, rheumatologists report they use their smartphone the most often (41%) and their smartphone has the greatest influence (30%) on their practice and clinical decision-making.

Andrew Spong's insight:

...or, indeed, any other specialty. As I discovered at EULAR last year, however, when rheumatologists do go for digital, they go all the way!

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When will pharma finally meet with patients where they live online?

When will pharma finally meet with patients where they live online? | Pharma | Scoop.it

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn (@healthythinker) writes:

 

As health care in America goes increasingly consumer-directed and value-based, organizations that lag behind and can’t prove their economic or social value will further lag. The brand equity calculus today requires social engagement. As consumers are asked to pay more out-of-pocket for care and health products, they/we will want health industry stakeholders (read: marketers) to show up in social media, which now, for people and patients, isn’t really social media anymore.

 

It’s just How and Where We Live.

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Sven Awege's curator insight, January 23, 2:12 AM

Nice graph, and the rationale is good.

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A social pill for pharma

A social pill for pharma | Pharma | Scoop.it

Pharmaceutical companies are slow to board the social media bus, but the rest of the healthcare industry isn’t waiting around.

 

Online health information is readily available, and consumers have no reservations about tapping the Internet and social environments to find it.

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