Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing
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Follow Apple’s Storytelling Example to Market your mHealth Brand

Follow Apple’s Storytelling Example to Market your mHealth Brand | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Why did millions of people recently rush to buy Apple’s latest iPhone? Maybe it was the allure of the newest, greatest thing.
eMedToday's insight:

Pharma experience mixed record on image and branding with the public.

 

Clearly, if they could develop a story approach to the public, that would have major postive impact

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eMedToday's curator insight, July 23, 2013 11:17 PM

Stories are the future marketing trend for hospitals

 

"When your mHealth brand tells a story, people will listen. And a good story makes it easy for people to get the picture so they don’t have to think too much about what you’re saying. Your story imprints a memorable image that your consumers will associate with your brand"

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Strong Medicine: Where Big Pharma Is Placing Bets In #digitalhealth In One Timeline  #hcsmeu #hcsmeufr

Strong Medicine: Where Big Pharma Is Placing Bets In #digitalhealth In One Timeline  #hcsmeu #hcsmeufr | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Merck's Global Health Innovation Fund is leading the pack with 24 digital health investments since 2009.

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Why Social Media Should Matter to Pharma Marketers


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loicpharma's curator insight, April 18, 6:21 AM
L'importance des médias sociaux chez les responsables marketing dans l'industrie pharmaceutique
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Clinicians are people, Platforms inspired by consumers; built for pharma

Clinicians are people, Platforms inspired by consumers; built for pharma | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Clinicians are people – just like us. Like us, most of them are busy, have friends and start their day on social media. In just the last two years, our media habits changed dramatically and there a…

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Alphabet introduces Verily study watch to assist clinical studies and health research – Normangee Star

Alphabet introduces Verily study watch to assist clinical studies and health research – Normangee Star | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

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Art Jones's curator insight, April 17, 12:36 PM

Excerpt:

Verily, the health technology subsidiary of Google’s parent company Alphabet today talked about its latest project: a smartwatch packed with sensors, an always-on display, a big battery, and a long-lasting battery that’s meant for longitudinal studies. It’s just something that will be given out to participants in Verily’s medical studies.

 

The aim of the device is to make the process of collecting body data more efficient as compared to other data collection processes. It is also equipped with advanced sensors which collect the heart rate data in ways more efficient than any other monitoring smartwatch. It also examines electrocardiogram, heart rate, electrodermal activity and inertial movements.

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Digital treatments can be real medicine

Digital treatments can be real medicine | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

What if an app could replace a pill? That’s the big question behind an emerging trend known as “digital therapeutics.” The idea: software that can improve a person’s health as much as a drug can, but without the same cost and side-effects.


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Mobile Trends in Pharma & Healthcare Advertising 

Seventy percent of Internet use is now on mobile — and taking market share from other platforms. Adapted from a live presentation from Google NY’s Mobile Trend…

Via Plus91, Rémy TESTON, Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Philippe Marchal
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Pharma Video Just Got Huge

Pharma Video Just Got Huge | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
For what feels like a long time now, I have been talking with photographers about the value clients are placing on video.  I have been encouraging photographers to find a solution for motion that works for them, whether it be a DP or they themselves holding the camera.  Either way, the writing has been on…
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The Top 10 Trends for Pharma Marketers in 2016

The Top 10 Trends for Pharma Marketers in 2016 | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
We believe these are those issues - the macro-trends that will directly affect pharma in 2016. Here, we describe them, we dissect them, and we break them down into what they mean to you, the pharma marketer.
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The 3-way partnership that is transforming Digital Pharma

Pharma enterprises have a uniquely complex set of challenges when it comes to launching products in the digital space. As their digital partner, customer
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Six Success Imperatives For Building A World-Class Digital Factory In Pharma

Six Success Imperatives For Building A World-Class Digital Factory In Pharma | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Digital factories—central, shared organizations that coordinate and deliver digital platforms and related services for the wider company—are here to stay. But are large pharmaceutical firms getting the most out of them? And how do you set the team up for success? Digital executives at global pharmaceutical firms need to calibrate six success factors to achieve the promised benefits of digital factories: a competitive time to market, reduced cost, and world-class digital capability.

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Digital Pharma Europe | About

Digital Pharma Europe | About | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Join me at the 9th Digital Pharma Europe event this 17-19 May in London. Save 15% w/ my speaker code C865VIP! https://t.co/4QLI0EGorV
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Can Social Media Improve Patient Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials? 

Can Social Media Improve Patient Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials?  | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

Less than 5% of patients with cancer participate in clinical trials, and most publicly funded cancer trials in the US fail to enroll sufficient numbers of patients to generate reliable results.1 For patients who do participate in clinical trials, they may not be representative of the population of individuals with cancer – participation is particularly low among older individuals and those in some racial and ethnic groups.2

Barriers to clinical trial participation were discussed at December’s American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting. In a special-interest session on social media and clinical trials, the use of Twitter for clinical trial recruitment was discussed by a panel that included several clinicians and a patient advocate. The other session was an industry/advocacy forum on creating a diversified clinical trial and included the patient point of view.

Patient Perspective on Barriers to Trial Participation

Jennifer Ahlstrom, Founder, Myeloma Crowd, Salt Lake City, Utah, presented the patient perspective at the social media session. Ms. Ahlstrom says that trying to enroll in a clinical trial is “labor intensive” for patients who don’t feel well, are scared and think they may be dying and don’t know what their options are. “That’s a hard time to make decisions,” she said.

She was diagnosed in 2010 with multiple myeloma and assumed after her initial treatment she would join a clinical trial because of recurrence. She searched clinicaltrials.gov and discovered over 450 open myeloma trials.

“I didn’t understand any of the drug names, what they did, what they were for, even the standard therapies.” She called 8 facilities to learn about their clinical trials and got a call back from two.

“The process is not patient-centered,” she said. “You have to really fight to get into clinical trials and [it’s] a big reason patients don’t join.”

Ms. Ahlstrom said another reason patients don’t join clinical trials is that their doctor doesn’t refer them, whether it’s because they don’t want them to go outside their practice or they just don’t know what clinical trials are open at other facilities.

To inform other patients with myeloma about clinical trials, she started an online radio show, Myeloma Crowd Radio, which features hour-long interviews with investigators, asking them to explain their research and clinical trials, including the rationale and eligibility in patient-friendly language.

To date, 95 shows have been produced and archived, and are available as audio files and transcripts to a million listeners and readers.

Her Myeloma Crowd website shares news about trials, and its SparkCures tool allows patients to access information about vetted clinical trials that would be appropriate for them.

Barriers for Minorities

On the topic of increasing clinical trial diversity, Cheryl A. Boyce, Patient Ambassador, Columbus Ohio, said, “the efficacy of a drug is really important for anyone who has an active disease process. And with many drugs I’m not sure what the efficacy is for people who are African American. So, the diversity issue is of critical importance.”

She used the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male — now referred to as the US Public Health Service Study3 — and the more recent experiences of Henrietta Lacks, whose tumor was the source of the widely-used HeLa cells,4 as examples of how things can go very wrong for people of color.

She said that many people in African American communities have heard those stories, and find it difficult to put trust in researchers who don’t look like them, or understand the cultural context of their belief systems. The underrepresentation of people of color as clinical investigators works against clinical trial recruitment.

Twitter as a Recruitment Aid

With Twitter, Michael A. Thompson, MD, PhD, Aurora Health Care, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, pointed out that pharmaceutical companies can tweet links to publicly available clinical trial information, e.g., if it is on clinicaltrials.gov, and suggested including the NCT number for tracking.

However, additional content not publicly available would probably require institutional review board approval to disseminate. He suggested pharmaceutical companies could use Twitter to follow conversations, e.g., those occurring at medical meetings, but not use it to promote their booths at those meetings.

The FDA has developed draft guidances to present information on drugs and devices using internet and social media platforms with character space limitations, i.e., Twitter,5 as well as a guidance for correcting third-party misinformation about drugs and devices.6

In general, information distributed by pharma on social media is subject to the same regulations that apply to distribution by any other means.

Joseph Mikhael, MD, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix, Arizona, acknowledged that many patients who may be eligible for clinical trials may not be on social media, but that often their family members or caregivers are. However, some patients will never be on Twitter, so other means of patient contact will be needed.

“Recruiting underrepresented minorities in clinical trials remains a grave challenge in medicine, and the use of social media might help by broadening the scope of information about clinical trials and research in general,” he said.

Dr. Thompson offered that a search of hashtags associated with ASH and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meetings allowed him to locate an appropriate local trial for a patient.

Ultimately it seemed that social media might be more useful for providers than patients.

Patient-Driven Solutions

Ms. Ahlstrom said that The Myeloma Crowd has run live patient meetings that were highly technical. This year they are producing pilot meetings for the minority community that are more basic, and have the theme of 5 steps to getting the best myeloma outcome.

One of those steps is to be aware of clinical trials.

Ms. Ahlstrom said, “I think one key thing is that the minority communities need to understand why knowing more is in their self-interest. It truly means longer life, which we want everyone to have.”

Ms. Boyce will be helping The Myeloma Crowd to identify topics that will apply to minority communities. She noted that the Intercultural Cancer Council has identified barriers to participation by underrepresented populations in clinical trials, and published policy recommendations several years ago.7

She said, “We know what we need to do; we just haven’t found the political will to do it. We’re better at planning than at implementing.”

Recommendations include removing barriers like lack of transportation or insurance, having awareness and education campaigns, addressing mistrust and language barriers, recruiting minority investigators, and encouraging referrals to clinical trials.

“If clinical trial participation is truly a priority in this country, we have to find a way to bring policy makers, industry, clinicians and community advocates together to figure out what parts of current policy are contradictory and serve as barriers themselves before we ever engage people. Every role should be defined and what support services are necessary to overcome barriers,” Ms. Boyce said.

She envisions a national education campaign that could even include information on cereal boxes and milk cartons, so the public will learn about clinical trials and research long before they may ever need to think about their own participation.

The Role of Advocacy Organizations

Daniel Auclair, PhD, VP, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF), Norwalk, Connecticut, said that patient advocacy groups can help break through barriers such as distrust toward pharma companies sponsoring trials and of the clinical trial process more generally.

Advocacy organizations may be able to provide better education about clinical trials to both clinicians and patients as well as devise personalized approaches to engage specific patient communities.

He noted that the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) (like other advocacy foundations) has a personalized clinical trial matching tool that is more patient-friendly and has more patient-specific information than that on clinicaltrials.gov, as well as a patient call center staffed 7 days a week around the clock.

Dr. Auclair said they need to go to patients “on their turf, in their terms.” Patients who have been in clinical trials can serve as patient ambassadors to bring information to their community to learn more about trials.

Patients need to be active participants and they need to be supported so they can participate in clinical trials because “clinical trials test new drugs and new drugs save lives,” he concluded.

Looking Ahead

Ms. Ahlstrom, Ms. Boyce, and Dr. Auclair all noted that when African Americans, who have fared poorly in the past, have improved access to treatment, they may do better than others with myeloma, probably due to lower-risk genetic abnormalities.

Dr. Auclair said that myeloma has been the “poster child” for disparities, as African Americans have 2 to 3 times the rate of myeloma as other populations.

If the results of small studies showing they fare as well or better with treatment were replicated in larger studies, those data could support the entire population receiving treatment.

Dr. Auclair said that one reason clinical trial enrollment may be higher in other areas, e.g., Europe, is that the healthcare system tightly regulates the availability of drugs. The only way patients may have access to the newest agents is if they participate in clinical trials.

“Especially in this climate, more than ever, we may want to think about the access issues and the socioeconomic issues. We don’t know where the system is going but it may become a little more like in Europe, where going onto clinical trials will be a way where you can access these drugs that you can access now, but may not be able to access in the near future. I think clinical trials may become more important in the future than they are now,” he said.


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How to become a digital champion in the internet of things in healthcare 

How to become a digital champion in the internet of things in healthcare  | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

Healthcare costs continue to climb around the globe. The advent of the internet of things has the potential to revolutionize the traditional paper-based healthcare treatment through the access of real-time patient data and remote patient monitoring. Connected healthcare, particularly for chronic sufferers, enables improved patient care and encourages patient self-management while at the same time lowering costs.


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Artificial intelligence could build new drugs faster than any human team

Artificial intelligence could build new drugs faster than any human team | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence algorithms are being taught to generate art, human voices, and even fiction stories all on their own—why not give them a shot at building new ways to treat disease? Atomwise, a San Francisco-based startup and Y Combinator alum, has built a system it calls AtomNet (pdf), which attempts to generate potential drugs for diseases like Ebol

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Art Jones's curator insight, April 20, 2:59 PM

Every new venture seeking to harness the power of Artificial Intelligence (AI) serves to amaze. Several innovators are working with AI to generate potential drugs to cure some of the world's most insidious diseases. AI is showing promise as the fastest method for Pharma to build drugs for the things that ail us.

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Managing Online Physician Reviews

Managing Online Physician Reviews | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

You know you’ve been there.  You want to find a new doctor or you’ve already selected a new doctor and you are seeing them for the first time. What do you do?  You Google! Before we go any further, let me first suggest that you become a discerning Googler when it comes to healthcare.

Many times, I end up having to dig deeper to page 2 or 3 or 4 on an online search to find substantial, credible information, and that’s crazy. Having to dig to page 3 or 4 to find the credible health information we seek is insane and poses a real problem for physicians and healthcare practices.

Today I’m passing along a great podcast for those interested in healthcare social media.  The podcast, “Doctor’s Reviews are In,” from Amazon #1 Best Selling Author, Daniel Lemin, tackles an interesting aspect of social media: online physician reviews.  Mr. Lemin sat down with Dr. Kevin Pho, the premier expert and leading physician voice for all things healthcare social media. If you haven’t checked out his comprehensive encyclopedia of a blog, you must.  He publishes four times a day.  Wow.

Inevitably, behemoth sites such as healthgrades.com and vitals.com come up first in any physician related online search. On these two sites, there is currently no requirement and no way to verify if a patient who writes a review has actually been seen by the physician they have reviewed. Healthgrades mentions they verify the person posting is not a spammer by “going through several validation steps,” such as confirming a reviewer’s email address. There is no mention of ability to confirm the patient actually saw the physician. I could not find an FAQ section on vitals.  I looked for a few minutes.  Either it’s not there or it is buried in some section of the website that is difficult to find, rendering it the same as not existing.

There is at least one online review company that offers verified reviews. ZocDoc offers a number of pretty cool tools: ability to schedule appointments online, to store redundant, painful check-in paperwork, and to review physicians you have seen. Their website is pretty slick, and easy on the eyes.

So what’s a physician to do?  Rely on word of mouth?  Ignore fake reviews?  Continue to be incognito online?  No!  Today it is more important than ever for physicians to be proactive about building their online reputation.  Dr. Pho eloquently points out that the practicing physician voice is almost totally missing from the online world. In addition, he stated that when a review is legitimate, studies suggest that most reviews are, in fact, positive!

Having to dig to page 3 or 4 in a Google search to find the credible health information you seek is insane and poses a real problem for physicians and healthcare practices.

I like Dr. Pho’s recommendations to offset and manage a physician’s online reputation.  Dr. Pho suggests taking a proactive, positive and creative approach to managing online reputations in healthcare.

  1. Bring your ratings system in house.  Bringing this feature “in-house” provides more control for a physician practice. The way I see it, there’s a number of ways to do this.  One, form a relationship with a service like ZocDoc so that you ensure reviews are legitimate and ranked well in online searches. Two, have patients write testimonials that are mailed in to your practice and put online.  Option two is probably not viable for most practices given the over paperworked, metric driven healthcare system that we exist in. Three, get an iPad for your practice so that patients can do a review at check out in the waiting room. Your IT guy can upload them to your website as featured testimonials.  Sure, it’s not a “usual” thing to do, and without a doubt, someone in the practice will complain that it’s too cumbersome or causes them too much extra work. However, I would argue losing business to a poor online brand and fake reviews is a worse idea. For the right practice that has a champion to own this process and is committed to improving their online brand, this could actually be a very easy thing to do.
  2. At a minimum, set up a LinkedIn profile.  Come on, docs!  This one is so easy.  It takes less than 20 minutes to set up a bare bones LinkedIn profile. Setting up a LinkedIn profile creates an online resume, provides you a public image online and lends you the power of LinkedIn’s search engine optimization.  Having the power of LinkedIn’s SEO is important, given that the unverified review sites have excellent SEO and often outrank physician’s own websites when their name is googled. Don’t have the time to make your profile or want to be trained on how to manage your social profiles?  Contact me.  It’s painless.  I promise.
  3. Consider joining HCP only social media sites like Doximity and SERMO.  Again, creating a Doximity or SERMO profile puts some powerful SEO behind your name, and connects you with a vast HCP network. Currently 500,000 physicians are members of Doximity.  Doximity also has a neat feature that allows HCPs to send and receive secure, HIPAA compliant faxes right from a mobile device. SERMO is the largest, global HCP-only social networking site with over 600,000 physician members.  It features such benefits as medical crowdsourcing for complex cases and confidential real world healthcare discussions.

There was so much fantastic information covered in the podcast.  I suggest taking a listen for yourself. The podcast is available on Manipurated.com, here. View my recommendations for additional ideas to start building an online brand in my previous post, “A lesson in personal branding: hiding online is no longer an option.

Taking a proactive approach to managing online reputation in healthcare will increasingly become important as patient satisfaction scores are already starting to drive reimbursement from payers.  Furthermore, patients are demanding a better service experience from their healthcare providers as healthcare costs are now frequently pushed down to the patient in the form of higher co-pays/co-insurance, consumer driven healthcare plans with high deductibles, and rising chronic disease epidemics. Dr. Pho points out that healthcare tends to lag a few years behind the newest trends.  Now that most of us can’t even eat at a restaurant without “Yelping” it first, I think it is safe to say, we are almost there with healthcare. I for one, am excited to see what the “Yelp” of healthcare will be!


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Social Media in Pharma

Despite the fact that social media has had a significant impact on the way that people communicate with each other and has been adopted globally by every kind …

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Big Pharma finds a hit with disease awareness social media posts in 2016 

Big Pharma finds a hit with disease awareness social media posts in 2016  | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

Pharma marketers continued to up their social media game in 2016, according to a new report, with many embracing disease awareness and charitable causes to drive engagement across social networks.

 


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Infographic: Physician Survey Regarding Patients Who Share Wearable Collected Health Data

Infographic: Physician Survey Regarding Patients Who Share Wearable Collected Health Data | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

A WebMD survey finds that patients are more engaged when they share their own health with their doctors.


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Halo Health's curator insight, April 3, 2:31 PM

Interesting graphic about how fitness trackers help with patient engagement.

Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, April 4, 8:45 AM

Value of patient-gathered data is NOT "debatable" anymore, especially with the multiplication of data point tracked...

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Why pharma companies and digital healthcare startups should embrace 

Why pharma companies and digital healthcare startups should embrace  | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

Operating extensively within the digital healthcare industry, both as a startup, as well as a digital marketing agency supporting global pharmaceutical companies has taught us that both have a need that the other can readily offer.

As pharma and consumer healthcare companies are quickly realising, the future of healthcare lies in the technologies of tomorrow. For digital healthcare startups on the other hand, the opportunities to see their dreams realised have never been more exciting. So, how and why can both the pharma company and the startup make positive headway here.


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Sanofi gets FDA clearance for insulin dose calculator app

Sanofi gets FDA clearance for insulin dose calculator app | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Following in the footsteps of Eli Lilly and Roche, Sanofi has quietly received FDA clearance for a smartphone app with a built-in insulin dose calculator. According to FDA documents, the app, cleared at the end of March, is called My Dose Coach.
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Understanding the Consumer Journey in Pharma Marketing Today-Bryan Cohen, Digital Platform Lead, Promotional Operations, Pfizer

Ahead of the marcus evans PharmaMarketing Summit 2017, Bryan Cohen discusses why pharma marketers need to view the journey through the consumer’s eyes
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Six Success Imperatives For Building A World-Class Digital Factory In Pharma

Six Success Imperatives For Building A World-Class Digital Factory In Pharma | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Digital factories—central, shared organizations that coordinate and deliver digital platforms and related services for the wider company—are here to stay. But are large pharmaceutical firms getting the most out of them? And how do you set the team up for success? Digital executives at global pharmaceutical firms need to calibrate six success factors to achieve the promised benefits of digital factories: a competitive time to market, reduced cost, and world-class digital capability.

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Pharmas acquiring exclusive rights to gain access to new markets and innovation will be a strong trend in 2017

Pharmas acquiring exclusive rights to gain access to new markets and innovation will be a strong trend in 2017 | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
In an expert view piece.Michael Jewell.healthcare partner at Cavendish Corporate Finance.discusses why acquiring exclusive rights will continue to be a key driv
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Big Pharma's big secret: What happens to drugs after their expiry dates?

Big Pharma's big secret: What happens to drugs after their expiry dates? | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Studies testing drugs 20 years after their expiry dates found in 12 out of 14 cases that they were still usable.
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Survey shows Americans are seriously worried about healthcare costs

Survey shows Americans are seriously worried about healthcare costs | Pharma: Trends and Uses Of Mobile Apps and Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
64% of Americans want to lower their healthcare costs, but don’t know how. Read more from a recent survey by Amino and research firm Ipsos.

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