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Pentagon Wants Smartphone Biometric Scanning Tool

Pentagon Wants Smartphone Biometric Scanning Tool | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
The Pentagon has inked a deal with tech company AOptix to develop a tool to turn a smartphone into a device that can scan eyes, faces, thumbs and voices.
Sven Awege's insight:

Hey, when this gets to market there's probably going to be huge potential uses elsewhere. Imagine validating doctors identities this way at a distance before they log into password protected sites!

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App-Using Patients Less Likely To Be Readmitted

App-Using Patients Less Likely To Be Readmitted | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
The Mayo Clinic has found cardiac rehab patients who use apps to monitor their health were less likely to be readmitted. By Katie Wike, contributing...

Via Alex Butler
Sven Awege's insight:

.... so yes,  going the extra mile with the CE can be worth it!

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DundeeChest's curator insight, April 13, 5:34 PM

Take 2 iPhone apps, three times a day.

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Survey: One third of wearable device owners stopped using them within six months

Survey: One third of wearable device owners stopped using them within six months | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
Sven Awege's insight:

Additionally, more than half of consumers who own one no longer use it!

Click on the "survey reads" to see report. Engagement is where the game is now.... just being flash doesn't cut it anymore.

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Nearly three-quarters of prescription-takers use mobile apps, including most older adults and seniors

Nearly three-quarters of prescription-takers use mobile apps, including most older adults and seniors | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it

Most patients taking prescription medicine (72%) also use mobile apps (Android smartphone, iPhone, Android tablet, iPad, or Kindle Fire),

Mobile app adoption rates are high across all medication-taking adult age groups: 93% (age 18-24), 90% (age 25-34), 88% (age 35-44), 80% (age 45-54), 66% (age 55-64), and 50% (age 65+),

App-using patients prefer the privacy-protected single app Mobile Health Library (MHL) system (by a factor of 11 to 1) over email programs often offered by medication manufacturers.  This high preference for a privacy-protected single app, customized to a user's needs for medication education and support services, was observed across all adult age groups.


Via Alex Butler
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Dr Martin Wale's curator insight, April 8, 11:05 AM

I've not been able to verify the funding source for this research, so it could just be marketing.  If you know, please comment.  Thanks!

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Infographie : l'#application mobile au coeur de la #msanté

Infographie : l'#application mobile au coeur de la #msanté | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it

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Can Big Data really transform healthcare?

Can Big Data really transform healthcare? | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
Like most sectors, pharma periodically discovers new buzzwords and hot topics which become inescapable for 2-3 years, and begin to sound like the answer to every question. At the moment, that buzzwords is 'big data' – but while the hype can...

 


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Denise Silber's curator insight, March 23, 5:11 AM

pharmaphorum. piece on big data, have a read!

 
TUPINIER Arnaud's curator insight, March 25, 6:28 AM

La problématique du big data, on le gère depuis longtemps en R&D, et même si le nombre de données à traiter devient de plus en plus important et que le besoin d'outils de traitement et de gestion des données est incontestable, mais les outils technologiques permettant de répondre à cette problématique vont-ils vraiment révolutionner et catalyser les avancées scientifiques... Rien n'est moins sûr, plus de données c'est plus de certitudes statistiques, plus de chances de comprendre les phénomènes étudiés mais c'est également plus de complexité à gérer !!!

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Google And Apple—Take My Fitness Data, Please!

Google And Apple—Take My Fitness Data, Please! | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it

This summer is shaping up to be a very healthy season—if you’re a maker of digital fitness apps. Both Apple and Google are scheduled to hold their big, annual events for developers, with new programming tools for health software taking center stage.

At Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference, the star of the show seems likely to be the rumored Healthbook, a repository for biological signals—“biosignals," for short. And Google seems poised to unveil details of Android Wear, its new platform for wearable devices, at Google I/O.


Via Alex Butler
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This is Healthbook, Apple's major first step into health & fitness tracking

This is Healthbook, Apple's major first step into health & fitness tracking | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
Seven years out from the original iPhone’s introduction, and four years past the iPad’s launch, Apple has found its next market ripe for reinvention: the mobile healthcare and fitness-tracking indu...
Sven Awege's insight:

Imagine enabling all that data (anonymously of course) for driving real health insights and guiding clinical research!

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How to build successful mobile health applications: 4 key principles

How to build successful mobile health applications: 4 key principles | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it

There is a great deal of attention being paid to mobile health applications at the moment, especially in the context of wearable technology. For example, Samsung, Apple and even Google, have recently made clear the focus they will place on this exciting intersection of biology, medicine, healthcare and digital technology. 


However, some statistics suggest 90% of health apps are deleted or not used again after 10 days, so getting it wrong can be a terrible waste of investment. From my experience, there are four key principles that tend to define if an application in healthcare will work, and if it is likely to be used:.


Via Alex Butler
Sven Awege's insight:

Great article by Alex to cover the conceptual positioning.

 

Additional areas that need high focus once you believe you have the aforementioned ingredients that I have seen Pharma struggling with (and assisted in solutioning):

 

- Is my app going to be classified as a Medical Device (and so what)?

- Sponsored vs Owned vs Influenced - and risk balancing

 

Additionally, this article also provides some insights into the stumbling blocks to avoid: 

http://pharmastrategic.com/2012/10/11/to-pharma-app-or-not-to-pharma-app-then-theres-the-it-question/

 

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Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, March 15, 5:21 AM

Applis e-santé: 4 conseils pour éviter ça: "some statistics suggest 90% of health apps are deleted or not used again after 10 days, so getting it wrong can be a terrible waste of investment"

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Merck's big data healthcare collaborations seek insights for drug development

Merck's big data healthcare collaborations seek insights for drug development | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
Sachin Jain, the CMIO of Merck's digital health arm talks about big data health insights it hopes to gain from healthcare industry collaborations.

Via Andrew Spong
Sven Awege's insight:

Another great initiative by Merck here. My question though is that the kinds of outcomes and insights we're talking about might be better managed by a more independent player! Not sure how comfortable patients are about being data-mined by a Pharma company.

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Healthcare's Trillion-Dollar Disruption

Healthcare's Trillion-Dollar Disruption | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
As a healthtech startup, you can't help but get excited when Bob Kocher (Venrock) or Esther Dyson speak about the opportunities in healthcare given their impressive track records. Both spoke during this past week's StartUp Health Summit. One of Bob's main points was that the opportunity in healthcare is so big [...]
Sven Awege's insight:

Wave 1: Patient-Centered Care (2010-2016)

Wave 2: Consumer Engagement (2014-2020)

Wave 3: The Science Of Prevention (2018-2025)

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Integration should be the trend of health care development 2014 | Health Business Consult

Integration should be the trend of health care development 2014 | Health Business Consult | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it

Health care is very much „in transition”. Have a quick look at the trends in health care 2014 . Now, try to predict what the outcomes will be of all these well intended developments?
Due to changes in structure of processes, organizations, patients’ journeys, devices, drugs, apps, telemonitoring – health care will run the risk of becoming highly fragmented, maybe even chaotic. Let’s hope that professionals and their patients still do know their way around.

Can this be prevented? As costs will drive change for the coming years, I guess not. Health care is fundamentally being transformed. Why? Because it has been righteously disrupted and it will take time before a new satisfactory system has emerged. Do we need to wait for that? No! We have to see how we can construe things in a more informed perspective. ..

..there is a sure direction to give that constitutes the basic principle for moving forward: both because it is immanent to all needed developments to better care, and because it creates the opportunity to developments in oversee-able steps of change. Every party can draw its own choice on this to design a proper blue print to their process of change.

This principle directive is: Integrate, integrate, integrate.

Integration in care is about the unification of both parties and activities, aided by technology, devices, information and medications, to create better care for health and its outcomes.
Integration will lead to better connections of different partners who are needed for a specific path or process of care. It will stimulate collaboration and coordination of activities between them. They will aim for better outcomes and higher effectiveness of care. It will lead to opportunities for more efficient arrangements of expertise and allocation of capacity of care givers.
With the compound of the interests of the key players in care (and I mean of course, patients included), costs can be more rationally arranged and may lead to lowering prices of care per patient per year. Also, it will inspire higher transparency of processes and clarity to patients about details of the caring activities themselves.

There are three different kinds of integration. Each, open to start with. So, any party may pick and start its own game changer. Even any couple of parties as intended partners, may do so too. Choose the most easiest entry to your future development together and enjoy the ride!

1. Integration by Co-Operation
2. Integration by Co-Creation. 3. Integration by “Experience Co-Creation”.

..


Via rob halkes
Sven Awege's insight:

Excellent read to understand the complexities :-)

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rob halkes's curator insight, February 19, 4:06 AM

;-)

Marcia Marinho's curator insight, March 8, 6:31 AM

interoperabilidade é a palavra chave em saúde hoje.

Web2Doctors's curator insight, March 15, 10:51 AM

interoperabilidade é a palavra chave em saúde hoje.

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US regulatory guidance on medical marketing in the electronic age - Legal Week Law

US regulatory guidance on medical marketing in the electronic age - Legal Week Law | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
Prevention better than cure - US regulatory guidance on medical marketing in the electronic age, Latham & Watkins, - Legal Week Law
Sven Awege's insight:

Good quick review of the FDA guidance from a legal perspective.

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Pharma's reputation stays low in 2013

Pharma's reputation stays low in 2013 | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it

Pharma's reputation stays low in 2013: PMLive

 

The reputation of pharma companies remained at a low ebb last year, with performance ratings down across the board compared to 2011, according to a survey of patient groups.

All told, 35 per cent of respondents to the PatientView poll indicated that multinational pharma companies had an "excellent" or "good reputation", around the same as in 2012 but down from 41 per cent in 2011.

Once again, the drug industry ranked second bottom among healthcare industries just ahead of for-profit health insurers, while biotech companies also slipped down the rankings a little.

"Pharma should worry about patients' views of its corporate reputation," said Alex Wyke, PatientView's chief executive.


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
Sven Awege's insight:

Good behavior is just the start of the corrective steps. Now we need to demonstrate our true commitment through providing real solutions to real problems, not just shiny bells! This is going to be hard for many Pharma marketers who still have a 6 month vision until the next big idea needs to be executed in panic mode!

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EUROPA - Press release - Healthcare in your pocket: unlocking the potential of mHealth

EUROPA - Press release - Healthcare in your pocket: unlocking the potential of mHealth | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
Sven Awege's insight:

he European Commission is today launching a consultation on #mHealth or mobile health, asking for help in finding ways to enhance the health and wellbeing of Europeans with the use of mobile devices, such as mobile phones, tablets, patient monitoring devices and other wireless devices.

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Rowan Norrie's curator insight, April 11, 4:54 AM

Links to useful European strategy and green papers on eHealth

 

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Roche joins forces with PatientsLikeMe | Pharmafile

Roche joins forces with PatientsLikeMe | Pharmafile | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
PatientsLikeMe has set up a five-year agreement with Genentech, Roche’s biologics arm, to allow the firm access to patients’ real-world experience with disease and treatment.
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A DOCTOR’S PRESCRIPTION FOR SOCIAL MEDIA

A DOCTOR’S PRESCRIPTION FOR SOCIAL MEDIA | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
SOURCE
MARCH 31, 2014 



As an experiment,  I immersed myself in social media for the past three months.  I started this blog, joined Twitter, LinkedIn,
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Corporate digital IQ linked to performance

Corporate digital IQ linked to performance | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it

PwC identifies five key capabilities that make a difference in raising a company's digital IQ.

 

They are:

 

Behavior 1: CEO actively champions digital

Behavior 2: Strong CIO-CMO relationship

Behavior 3: Outside-in approach to digital innovation

Behavior 4: Significant New IT Platform investments

Behavior 5: View digital as an enterprise capability  

 


Via Andrew Spong
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Andrew Spong's curator insight, March 28, 9:20 AM

Even the pharma companies who perform relatively (a loaded term) well in digital environments fail at least one of these criteria.

 

Most fail more than one.

 

Some fail all of them.

 

And: I'm probably being generous.

 

N.B. it goes without saying that 'significant new IT platform investment' need not correspond to measurable improvements across measures.

Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, April 1, 11:07 AM

did they attend SPMSD LTA forum?

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Google addresses top 10 myths associated with Glass

Google addresses top 10 myths associated with Glass | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
In a recent post on Google+, the Glass team addressed the top 10 myths related to the futuristic augmented reality visor in an effort to simply "clear the air." Privacy concerning Glass is no doubt a hot topic as evident……

 


Via Denise Silber
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Denise Silber's curator insight, March 21, 7:51 PM

Google Glass is also a great advert for Google

 
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, March 22, 6:42 AM

Pharmageek partenaire de Interaction Healthcare à l'occasion de la conférence :

"Du serious game au Google glass, comment la simulation numérique peut changer la pratique du médecin et la vie du patient ?"

qui aura lieu

le 3 avril prochain à PARIS

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LA VERSION CANADIENNE DE LA CONFÉRENCE 

Pharmageek partenaire de Interaction Healthcare à l'occasion de la conférence :

"Du serious game au Google glass, comment la simulation numérique peut changer la pratique du médecin et la vie du patient ?"

qui aura lieu

le 10 avril prochain à MONTREAL -CANADA


INSCRIVEZ VOUS

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Social Media: A Review and Tutorial of Applications in Medicine and Health Care

Social Media: A Review and Tutorial of Applications in Medicine and Health Care | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
Social Media: A Review and Tutorial of Applications in Medicine and Health Care

 

Background: Social media are dynamic and interactive computer-mediated communication tools that have high penetration rates in the general population in high-income and middle-income countries. However, in medicine and health care, a large number of stakeholders (eg, clinicians, administrators, professional colleges, academic institutions, ministries of health, among others) are unaware of social media’s relevance, potential applications in their day-to-day activities, as well as the inherent risks and how these may be attenuated and mitigated.
Objective: We conducted a narrative review with the aim to present case studies that illustrate how, where, and why social media are being used in the medical and health care sectors.
Methods: Using a critical-interpretivist framework, we used qualitative methods to synthesize the impact and illustrate, explain, and provide contextual knowledge of the applications and potential implementations of social media in medicine and health care. Both traditional (eg, peer-reviewed) and nontraditional (eg, policies, case studies, and social media content) sources were used, in addition to an environmental scan (using Google and Bing Web searches) of resources.
Results: We reviewed, evaluated, and synthesized 76 articles, 44 websites, and 11 policies/reports. Results and case studies are presented according to 10 different categories of social media: (1) blogs (eg, WordPress), (2) microblogs (eg, Twitter), (3) social networking sites (eg, Facebook), (4) professional networking sites (eg, LinkedIn, Sermo), (5) thematic networking sites (eg, 23andMe), (6) wikis (eg, Wikipedia), (7) mashups (eg, HealthMap), (8) collaborative filtering sites (eg, Digg), (9) media sharing sites (eg, YouTube, Slideshare), and others (eg, SecondLife). Four recommendations are provided and explained for stakeholders wishing to engage with social media while attenuating risk: (1) maintain professionalism at all times, (2) be authentic, have fun, and do not be afraid, (3) ask for help, and (4) focus, grab attention, and engage.
Conclusions: The role of social media in the medical and health care sectors is far reaching, and many questions in terms of governance, ethics, professionalism, privacy, confidentiality, and information quality remain unanswered. By following the guidelines presented, professionals have a starting point to engage with social media in a safe and ethical manner. Future research will be required to understand the synergies between social media and evidence-based practice, as well as develop institutional policies that benefit patients, clinicians, public health practitioners, and industry alike.


Via rob halkes
Sven Awege's insight:

Great paper to help professionals by providing a starting point to help navigate.

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rob halkes's curator insight, March 19, 2:27 PM

Social Media is going to play a significant rol in health care. It may have a farreachiung implication indeed. But we still have to see and observe how that is going to happen. What we however ought to do, is to see how we change health care to better outcomes and fewer costs, to prevent that the "disruption of care" will have consequences we don't want.

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US regulator to launch ‘openFDA’

US regulator to launch ‘openFDA’ | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
The FDA is planning to introduce a new digital resource in order to open up its data to the public and increase access to its information.
Sven Awege's insight:

Three broad focus areas:

adverse events

product recalls

product labelling

My money on startups gathering around the first!

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Stanford and Google team up to simulate key drug receptor

Stanford and Google team up to simulate key drug receptor | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Roughly 40 percent of all medications act on cells' G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One of these receptors, beta 2 adrenergic receptor site (B2AR), naturally transforms between two base configurations; knowing the precise location of each of approximately 4,000 atoms is crucial for ...
Sven Awege's insight:

Boundaries blurring on all fronts. Pharma needs to partner more with different partners to the usual culprits, or get sidelined by alternative groupings.

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Seeking Insights About Cycling Mood Disorders via Anonymized Search Logs

Seeking Insights About Cycling Mood Disorders via Anonymized Search Logs | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it
Seeking Insights About Cycling Mood Disorders via Anonymized Search Logs
Sven Awege's insight:

Powerful techniques like these will drive better insights, and hopefully generate better solutions from all stakeholders to deliver meaningful outcomes to our patients.

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Social Networking Sites and the Continuously Learning Health System

U.S. Institute of Medicine white paper: Social Networking Sites and the Continuously Learning Health System: A Survey

Click here to edit the title

Sven Awege's insight:

KEY FINDINGS FROM THE SURVEYS

Sharing for care improvement: 94 percent of American social media users agree with sharing their health data to help doctors improve care.

· With appropriate anonymity, 94 percent of American social media users with a medical condition would be willing to share their health data to help doctors improve care. The same proportion (94 percent) would be willing to do this to help other patients like them.

Sharing for better evidence: 92 percent of American social media users with a medical condition agree with sharing their health data to help research.

· 92 percent of American social media users with a medical condition would be willing to anonymously share health data for researchers to learn more about their disease. 84 percent would be willing to share such information with drug companies to help them make safer products, and 78 percent would do so to let drug companies learn more about their disease.

Sharing to help others: 94 percent of American social media users agree with sharing their health data to help patients like themselves.

· 94 percent of American social media users believe that their health data should be used to improve the care of future patients who may have the same or similar condition.

Desire to share outweighs open questions: 76 percent of American social media users worry that health data they share may be used in detrimental ways.

· 76 percent of American social media users with a medical condition believe that data from their personal health records potentially could be used without their knowledge. 72 percent believe their data could be used to deny them health care benefits, and 66 percent believe it could be used to deny them job opportunities.

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2014: the year of social pharma

2014: the year of social pharma | Pharma Strategic | Scoop.it

Prodeep Bose (who I can't find on Twitter, but anyway...) writes:

 

"The central crux of the FDA's ruling suggests that a company’s responsibility is for content posted and not the entirety of the social context. And the intent, if I were to derive one, is to enable—if not empower—pharma to engage in social marketing.

 

In fact, I would suggest that it is the responsibility of pharma to engage and dispel inaccuracies regarding its products with a genuine intent in doing just so, in a responsible manner. And I imagine that the positive thinker on either side of the regulatory fence, whether at FDA or pharma, would see eye to eye on furthering the goal of legitimate information dissemination through the most powerful means of communications in our time—social engagement."


Via Andrew Spong
Sven Awege's insight:

Attitude and a real wish to make a difference - regulation is just an excuse. But... I would also challenge that perhaps social media is not always the channel to provide the biggest bang! Upstream clear thinking is critical, while panning for measurement will also ensure that we can build perenniality by demonstrating true engagement that matters on a scale that has impact.

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Andrew Spong's curator insight, February 27, 9:02 AM

It is the proactive acknowledgment of pharma's moral and ethical responsibility that Prodeep alludes to in the second paragraph that is key here.

 

Regulations are, and always have been, the secondary issue: the desire and intent to participate in a responsible, approvable manner is all that is required.

 

If you're waiting for guidelines to find loopholes, you're not in the right place to use social technologies anyway.

 

As numerous commentators have said on many occasions, the principle obstacles to the industry's adoption of social are internal: a lack of will, understanding, and capability.

Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, February 27, 11:04 AM

pressure is raising to make pharma moving forward in social

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The Digital Age- Insights from the Industry - YouTube

The Digital age is forcing Healthcare Professionals to think beyond the traditional marketing ploys and to bridge the gap between patients, doctors and pharma companies by integrating Digital & Social Media. Experts from the industry have shared their views on how digital is going to be the next big thing in the Pharma Industry. This is a 2nd video from the series of videos taken from DigiSights 2013- India's 1st Digital Marketing Conference for Pharma & Healthcare organized by MediaMedic Communications.


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
Sven Awege's insight:

Great discussions - worth the short break to listen to this.

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