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Healthcare Marketing: Videos for Viral Engagement | HealthWorks Collective

Healthcare Marketing: Videos for Viral Engagement | HealthWorks Collective | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
Of the thousands of hospital or healthcare videos, few will ever “go viral.” But nearly all online videos that get big shares will be fueled by emotion.
Pere Florensa's insight:

 Las emociones ayudan a compartir contenido haciendo que llegue a mas personas, la fórmula que propone: Mira, Siente , Comparte suele funcionar, aunque no siempre!

Propone tres pasos:

-Título,

-utilizar conductore emocionalesque hagan que la gente comparta

-Crear contenidos que lleguen al punto emocional correcto

Estas tácticas son acertadas, pero no existe la fórmula del éxito que asegure que nuestro contenido se convertirá en viral, como comenté en el blog:

http://healthyadvertising.es/conseguir-un-video-viral/.

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COM SALUD's curator insight, November 21, 2013 11:31 AM

Como contamos en nuestro blog www.comunicacionsalud.com, los vídeos son una herramienta clave en la comunicación de salud, y pueden educar o desinformar: http://ow.ly/r3ndw 

Healthy Advertising
Health and pharma digital marketing agency
http://healthyadvertising.es
Barcelona
Curated by Pere Florensa
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Las 5 fases de la pharma digital

Las 5 fases de la pharma digital | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
Desde los analógicos a la pharma social hay varios estados,a pesar de que el sector está algo rezagado hay empresas que están mas digitalizadas que el resto
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The wearable tech market could reach 385 million people and change how we 'consume and use information'

The wearable tech market could reach 385 million people and change how we 'consume and use information' | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it

In just a few years, there could be more people using wearable tech devices than there are in the US and Canada.In a note to clients on Monday — alongside initiation of Fitbit coverage — Piper Jaffray’s Erinn Murphy and Christof Fischer stated that "wearable technology will be the next generation of devices to transform how individuals consume and use information."Murphy and Fischer estimate the wearable tech category will grow from 21 million units in 2014 to 150 million units in 2019, a 48% compound annual growth rate (CAGR).This growth will largely be fueled by wrist wearables like smart watches and fitness bands.


Via Alex Butler
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Digital Health Space: Habits of Physicians Posting for Professional Purposes

Digital Health Space: Habits of Physicians Posting for Professional Purposes | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
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Vacunas, antivacunas y storytelling

Vacunas, antivacunas y storytelling | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
 La aparición de varios casos de enfermedades prácticamente erradicadas ha generado un debate publico sobre las vacunas, los antivacunas, y los derechos de a
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7 Stats About the Top Social Networks for Brands | Simply Measured

7 Stats About the Top Social Networks for Brands | Simply Measured | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
For our 2015 State of Social Marketing Report, we looked into which of the top social networks are used by the most brands. We Analyzed the Interbrand 100 Companies across YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, Pinterest, and Tumblr.  Below are some key findings from this analysis. Download your copy of the full report for free  to…
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Brain injury survivors are storytelling their way to recovery

Brain injury survivors are storytelling their way to recovery | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
By narrating their own experiences, brain injury survivors are tackling discrimination, developing their skills and building confidence
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Drones que salvan vidas

Drones que salvan vidas | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
Los drones se han utilizado con fines médicos en catátrofes y epidemias. Recientemente se ha presentado un dron "ambulancia".¿Ciencia ficción o realidad?
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La clave para el mercado del autocuidado pasa por dar más poder al consumidor a través de las nuevas tecnologías

La clave para el mercado del autocuidado pasa por dar más poder al consumidor a través de las nuevas tecnologías | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
El 51 Encuentro Anual de la Industria del Autocuidado, que se celebra estos días en Barcelona, analiza las principales estrategias a seguir en el mercado de los medicamentos de venta libre. ...
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Design Thinking en Salud

Taller realizado en la Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (Granada) dentro del V Experto en Promoción de la Salud en Contextos Sanitarios, Educativos y Sociales…

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4 Healthcare Brands That Are Using YouTube Right

4 Healthcare Brands That Are Using YouTube Right | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it

With more than 1 billion users and 300 hours of video uploaded every minute, YouTube has clearly moved far beyond being simply a home for user-generated cat clips.

Yet many brands, especially healthcare brands, still haven’t fully embraced the network; in part this is because of lingering weariness, but the hesitancy is also rooted in not knowing exactly where to start.

 

Delay no longer. Thanks to a few pioneering brands, it has become clear over the past few years that YouTube is an excellent outlet for distributing healthcare-related content.

In particular, the four brands below are excellent models to follow for using the platform to build interest and engagement.

1. Cigna

An analysis by Performics last year found that Cigna gets the most views per video on YouTube of any major healthcare provider. What’s the secret to its success? Largely, that the company commits ad spend to serve its short pieces as pre-rolls before other YouTube videos.

While that may sound like cheating, it’s actually a great example of how to use YouTube right. Cigna has devoted time to developing specific digital short-form ads—the videos are around 15 to 20 seconds on average—and it’s targeting relevant content and audiences. In other words, the company is creating its YouTube videos with a very clear purpose in mind.

 

2. GE Healthcare

 

YouTube’s Creator Playbook for Brands constantly stresses the importance of developing engaging videos. Why? Because, as the guide puts it, “Compelling videos can bring in new viewers, introduce them to the rest of your content, and build a loyal fanbase.”

GE Healthcare does an excellent job of drawing audiences in by showing off its products in engaging ways. For example, this simple, but compelling, HD ultrasound piece has garnered 168,000 views.

 

3. Novartis

 

Life hacks are one of the staples of YouTube, with tens of thousands of videos on the platform explaining how to do everything from tying a tie to falling asleep better.

Earlier this year, Novartis smartly took this trope and used it for a much more serious purpose: highlighting creative ways to make everyday tasks simpler for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS). The “7 Small Life Hacks That Make a Big Difference” already has nearly 74,000 views.

 

4. CMN Hospitals

 

The patients at Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals often have inspiring and heartbreaking stories.

On its YouTube channel, the organization does an excellent job of highlighting some of these tales. The pieces range in topic and length (some go as long as 13 minutes), but all are presented beautifully and tastefully.

 


Via Plus91, Denis Granger
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Janet Vasil's curator insight, May 28, 8:18 AM

These are some great examples of how video is used in healthcare  marketing. Medical, health and wellness professionals and organizations have a wealth of appealing stories they can tell with video.  (I know because I produced thousands of patient-centered stories all over the country for a medical TV syndicator for more than a decade.)

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Un algoritmo y el historial médico, tu próximo médico de cabecera: el caso de LABCO #eHealth

Un algoritmo y el historial médico, tu próximo médico de cabecera: el caso de LABCO #eHealth | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
A medida que los smartphones y los wearables se van haciendo un hueco en nuestras vidas, las métricas sobre nuestra salud son cada vez más...

Via Mariano Fernandez S.
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Mariano Fernandez S.'s curator insight, May 25, 6:49 AM

A medida que los smartphones y los wearables se van haciendo un hueco en nuestras vidas, lasmétricas sobre nuestra salud son cada vez más cuantificables. Y estos datos pueden ser tremendamente útiles para optimizar nuestra actividad física a medida según nuestras necesidades.

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Study: Mobile pharma app increases med adherence

Study: Mobile pharma app increases med adherence | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
Mobile apps geared toward helping HIV patients adhere to medication intake requirements can significantly boost medication adherence, according to a new report conducted by Avella Specialty Pharmacy.
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Harvard researchers tested 23 online ‘symptom checkers.’ Here’s how they stack up.

Harvard researchers tested 23 online ‘symptom checkers.’ Here’s how they stack up. | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it

Ever asked the Internet what your symptoms mean and gotten a response that seemed wacky or totally off base? It's not your imagination.In an audit that is believed to be the first of its kind, Harvard Medical School researchers have tested 23 online “symptom checkers” — run by brand names such as the Mayo Clinic, the American Academy of Pediatrics and WebMD, as well as lesser-knowns such as Symptomate — and found that, though the programs varied widely in accuracy of diagnoses and triage advice, as a whole they were astonishingly inaccurate. Symptom checkers provided the correct diagnosis first in only 34 percent of cases, and within the first three diagnoses 51 percent of the time.


Via Alex Butler, Josepf J Haslam, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Havas Lynx Medical's curator insight, July 13, 3:13 AM

Of course we need a comparison with those age old symptom checkers 'doctors' to know if this is bad or not

Tom Rees's curator insight, July 13, 3:46 AM

They didn't assess whether a human could do better, and they didn't assess NHS direct. Nevertheless a cautionary tale! 

David Proudlock's curator insight, July 13, 4:40 AM

I wonder how IBM's Watson would fare as a symptom checker in this test?

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Goodbye vanity URLs | implication for pharma ads and branded websites

Goodbye vanity URLs | implication for pharma ads and branded websites | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
On April 1st, 2008 Google policy was updated and required that all ads display URLs must match its destination URL. However, in the pharmaceutical world...

Via Olivier Delannoy
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Big Pharma Eyes iPhone For Drug R&D

Big Pharma Eyes iPhone For Drug R&D | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
To develop new drugs, the pharmaceutical industry is thinking about gathering user data through iPhone apps.

Via Sam Stern, eMedToday
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5 types of doctors you will meet on social media #hcsmeu

5 types of doctors you will meet on social media #hcsmeu | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it

Twitter is a communication platform, and, therefore, it is a neutral medium. It’s not the medium itself, but how you use the medium that makes Twitter “good” or “bad.” In my five years of being an anonymous and five months of being a named individual on Twitter, I have come to realize that different people use Twitter for different purposes. In general, these are the five people (or doctors) I have met on Twitter. They have enriched my experience on social media and taught me much about life and doctoring.

 

1. The knowledge distributor. These are the ones who frequently tweet and retweet various information, news, latest studies, guidelines, and opinions. Following a few of these people will add to your knowledge base. They often have tens of thousands of followers, and they usually have tens of thousands of tweets. They are good at disseminating information. Their timeline is full of information. The downside? They read like a newsfeed and therefore often lack the personal and social engagement that is an enjoyable part of Twitter. But they serve their purpose well. I learn lots of new things from them.

2. The court jester. The court jester is the one who entertains, enlightens and yet educates at the same time. They’re the ones who put up a mirror to our faces. They poke fun at important issues, sometimes even taboos, and bring up a very important message. They are often the ones behind the mask who would tell the truth when no one else would. They provide the behind-the-scenes look at the medical industry (or any industry) and challenge the status quo. As you can guess, they’re often anonymous. They’re the ones the lawyers and administrators warn you about. But I see great value in following them. Because they tell the truth behind their masks, I reckon every industry needs some of these, with respect of course. I can think of a few doctors who are anonymous who make a massive impact through their tweets and blogs.

3. The social collaborator. They are fun to hang out with. They are one of the main reasons for joining social media. It is social after all. There are lots of conversations about life. Lots of food photos and baby photos. And cat photos, of course. One must never forget the abundance of cat photos on Twitter. Sometimes, in their eminently sociable space, the line between public and personal lives get crisscrossed. Raw emotions, anger, bitterness and hurts make their way into their tweets. It can be painful to watch. Sometimes downright unprofessional. But I love following them, because at the end of the day, we’re human. I need to always be in touch with the raw and unpredictable nature of human emotions and relationships.

4. The relentless commentator. The devil’s advocate. They seem to have an opinion on and a comment for anything and everything. Some of them good, some of them very critical and negative. They always provide a contrasting view, and they’re happy to let loose with their opinions. You’ll find them debating certain issues with passion and their timeline reads like an angry verbal joust. It’s good to follow them because there are always many sides to any story, and you get to learn from them. However, the line between respectful difference versus discourteous disagreement can be very thin at times. The first rule of Twitter: Be respectful of others.

5. The thought leader. Here’s the one everyone wants to be. The person who leads the world with contemporary ideas and tweets their sophisticated perspective to everyone. Twitter truly adds to their impact and in some immeasurable ways, they are truly changing the world. They are examples of what’s good on Twitter. The synthesis and harnessing of people and expertise. There are not too many of them around, true thought leaders. When you’ve found them, they’re a treasure to follow as they enrich your days with colorful thoughts and perspectives. I’m certain that they would be as amazing in real life as they are on Twitter.

It would be great to follow a few of these different kinds of tweeps to challenge your thinking and enhance your perspective. What about yourself? What kind of a twitter person are you? My guess is that most of us would be a bit of all of them. Who we are on Twitter is probably defined by who we are in real life and what our purposes are in joining social media.

 


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Weelicious Menus's curator insight, July 23, 6:50 PM

Who's your favorite docs on Twitter?

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Internet Of Things To Change The Face Of US Healthcare

Internet Of Things To Change The Face Of US Healthcare | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is already revolutionizing our lives. Endowing
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FirstWord Lists The biggest drug approvals of 2015

FirstWord Lists  The biggest drug approvals of 2015 | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
FirstWord Pharma - Gain Access to the Information You Need Track the Companies,
Products, and Regulatory Areas of Most Interest to You
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La economía colaborativa llega a los hospitales

La economía colaborativa llega a los hospitales | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
La empresa estadounidense Cohealo ha creado e instaurado un software para compartir equipamientos hospitalarios siguiendo el modelo de AirBnb
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Patient information too high for patients' literacy

Patient information too high for patients' literacy | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
More than 90 per cent of educational materials written for kidney disease patients is higher than an average patient's literacy, according to a new study published in the June issue of the National Kidney Foundation's American Journal of Kidney Diseases.
"Our study suggests most patient information materials are not fit for their intended purpose, and that organisations are producing materials that may be too difficult for their intended audience to understand," said Angela Webster, lead researcher and an Associate Professor Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Sydney.

Via ChemaCepeda
Pere Florensa's insight:

"La información para pacientes continua siendo demasiado difícil de entender para ellos" según dice un estudio. vía @ChemaCepeda

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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, June 2, 2:43 PM

Tenemos la capacidad y las herramientas, pero seguimos poniendo la información de salud difícil de entender para los usuarios

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Pharmaceutical firms wake up to the power of social media

Pharmaceutical firms wake up to the power of social media | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it

Top pharmaceutical companies are making far more effort to engage audiences on social media claims a report “Connecting the Dots: Which Pharma Companies are Succeeding in the Social Media Space?“ from agency Ogilvy Healthworld. Looking at the pharma companies which are most successful on social sites, the report suggests that in order to engage audiences, firms must be brave and prepared to have honest and meaningful conversations about their brands.

“We know that some pharma companies have been cautious in their approach to social media, but our report clearly demonstrates a dramatic and successful increase in activity,” explains Rebecca Canvin, social media manager at Ogilvy Healthworld, adding: “social media has changed the way pharma companies communicate – it allows them to build corporate reputation and engage in genuine, meaningful conversations with audiences. For companies who want to stand out from the crowd it’s time to be brave, get personal, educate and integrate social media into their wider marketing strategy.”

On one hand, it is surprising that healthcare firms are so keen to use social media, as regulatory boundaries and compliance constraints provide some limitations on what they can say. On the other hand, social media provides the perfect forum to explain about latest health findings, as Canvin says: “People don’t want to wade through hundreds of pages of disease information, but they may be more open to new knowledge on social media … Social media has the potential to revolutionise the way big pharma educates physicians, allowing doctors to obtain the facts they require without the many issues often associated with rep visits or advertising to clinicians.”

Key findings

The average number of tweets by pharma has gone up by 530 per cent since 2013 and Twitter followers have increased by nearly 300 per centThe pharma companies with the biggest communities aren’t necessarily the most effective at engaging with their users and generating interest.Followers reward pharma companies who post frequently and engage continuously – those that keep their networks fresh with regular updates have the highest interaction from the community.

 

Looking at the firms which better communicate on social, it seems that size isn’t everything. Those companies with the most followers don’t always succeed in engaging their audiences. For example, companies Boehringer and Novo Novdisk have community sizes well below the average, yet score highly when it comes to engagement.

What does drive engagement is the amount a company uses social media. Canvin explains: “It isn’t hard to understand why the most active companies are the ones enjoying the most engagement – after all, social media in its very nature demands participation and interaction. And, of course, any conversation is a two-way street. The increase in involvement that we saw in 2014 is not just because pharma companies are becoming more active, but because their audiences are also showing a little more willingness to jump in. Overall, it seems that followers will reward the companies who post frequently and engage continuously – those organisations with high activity scores received more likes and comments on Facebook and more replies from Twitter followers.”

Methodology

The data for the report was gathered by monitoring 10 of the most popular networks for 14 pharma companies across six categories: social presence, social network, community size, activity, engagement and activity. The profile of each company was reviewed for one week per month for three months during 2014 to ensure sufficient data was collected.

 


Via Plus91, Denis Granger
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The Tech Giants’ Plan to Mine Our Bodies for Data—and Profit

The Tech Giants’ Plan to Mine Our Bodies for Data—and Profit | Healthy Advertising | Scoop.it
Apple, Google, and Samsung want to capitalize on your personal health data. But is there really big money in it?
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Pharma Digital Marketing - 5 future trends

Digital Marketing within the Pharma Industry: The first and safer way is to summarize the past 12 months, the second, more dangerous but also more exciting is …

Via eMedToday, Celine Sportisse
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Pascal Kerhervé's curator insight, June 5, 3:36 AM

Digital is not a nice to have anymore, Patients & HCPs expect and seek for services and information there!

Chloe Paltrow's comment, June 15, 3:55 AM
Nice slides. Good one. Would you like to know power of videos on Bio-pharma industry. You can check this infographic to get a clear vision http://www.b3netbio.com/the-power-of-videos-in-your-bio-pharma-industry/