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The Future of Pharma Social Media

The Future of Pharma Social Media | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

 

MM&M recently spoke with patient advocates to find out the value created by pharma social media campaigns – both owned and sponsored. Patients were asked about the effectiveness of pharma social media and to share advice for pharma industry to create social media programs that are engaging, effective and relevant.

Among advocates’ top 10 tips for pharma social media programs, allowing patients to play a key role in the community came across as the single most important piece of advice.

Specifically:

Consult with patients before developing communities to shape strategy around patient needsAllow patients to play a larger role in management and moderation of communitiesAppoint community owners that have deep understanding of social media, as well as the disease and products

The more involved patients are in planning a community, the more likely they are to use it and become ambassadors, ensuring that people are aware of its existence and trust its intentions.

Two other interesting insights from patients:

Trying to be trendy can send the wrong message about understanding the serious impact of disease.Make it easy for people to find your content. Social media can be good for sharing, but lags in the area of “discovery” and “search.”

For a great example of pharma social media, check out Sanofi’s Diabetes Co-Stars campaign.

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Malicious Medical Machines? Doctors' Devices and Data Under Attack from Hackers

Malicious Medical Machines? Doctors' Devices and Data Under Attack from Hackers | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
A new report highlights the threats to your medical records and the devices doctors use to save lives.

 

Obviously, health care organizations need to get serious about securing their networks and devices, even at a basic level. "Consider everything with an IP address to be a critical endpoint," said Glines, who went on to say that stronger password protocols for everything from medical devices to firewalls would improve the situation.

 

New legislation might also encourage better behavior. Glines pointed to European Union laws that fine companies a percentage of their revenue when a breach occurs or a loss of data takes place. Though HIPAA is intended to provide protection, Norse maintined that compliance simply did not equate security.

 

But there's a role for regular people, too. Stiansen encouraged patients to question their healthcare provider about cybersecurity. Glines agreed saying, "consumers are the ones who have the most to lose. They have the right to ask how their records are maintained and what sort of security procedures are in place."


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Are doctors being duped through medical education? Could social media help?

Are doctors being duped through medical education? Could social media help? | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

I made a discovery this week about the novel anticoagulant medications,dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), apixaban (Eliquis) and edoxaban(Lixiana). I was looking into the often-asked question of how these new drugs compare to the old standard, warfarin.

The discovery felt like a Eureka moment. I ran it by my stats guy–my son–and a couple of colleagues, and they confirmed, that my discovery was truth. I’m working on a post now that discusses the details of how the medical world has been misled about these drugs. Stay tuned.

 

Medical Education:

For now, though, this revelation got me thinking about medical education. How does it happen that doctors (and patients) can be misled?

 

Many smart people think medical misinformation occurs in large part because industry pervades medical education. Examples abound, but look no further than the dronedarone (Multaq) blemish. The short story is that dronedarone was touted as a new wonder drug for AF. The marketing held it up as a metabolite of amiodarone that had the mother drug’s efficacy but none of its toxicity–an amiodarone light. This was hogwash. The drug was evaluated in studies designed to obfuscate. It was hyped by thought leaders with deep financial ties to the drug maker. And then, even when trial data and real-world experience demonstrated inefficacy, the hype persisted. Thought leaders continued to make dinner rounds in cities throughout Europe and the US. Not until the PALLAS trial showed that dronedarone increased mortality in patients with permanent AF, did the noise die down. The excessive hype was an embarrassment for the cardiology community.

 

This brings me back to continuing medical education or CME. Currently, most CME is offered to doctors free of charge. But, of course, everyone knows about free lunches. The way doctors get free (or discounted) CME is through industry funding. For-profit medical companies happily provide dollars and expertise for medical education. They hire thought leaders, often guideline writers, to do lectures and webinars. They fund medical societies who then curate the content of the education. Industry entwines itself in medical education.

 

Medical education, however, is not supposed to be like an advertisement. Ads are declared as ads. The lines blur when industry sponsors CME.

A skeptic might posit that a thought leader can easily tout a dubious drug during a CME activity. Mind you, not in a criminal ProVasic kind of way. Rather, the nimble-of-mind academic can hide behind relative risk ratios and dodgy study designs. The skeptic might say this is worse than an evening news ad or glossy spread in a print journal. I wonder: is it worse because it’s tricky? Or worse because it’s effective? Or both?

The same idea holds true for medical journal editors. They suspect a study is dubious but let it pass because they are conflicted by the need to sell journals and advertising space. A possible scenario: Let’s say a pacemaker company supports a journal with big advertising dollars. Then let’s say that pacemaker company suffers a ghastly lead recall. How easy will it be for editors to publish negative editorials or studies on that lead? I’m just asking. These are humans playing the game after all.

This stuff is important. I often find myself shaking my head at conferences. I think to myself: Are doctors really this gullible? They can’t see the manipulation?

 

Such examples lead some skeptics to say that medical education should be funded by only one source–the person consuming the education. Namely the doctors. This makes a lot of sense on paper. The problem comes in deciding how much CME should cost? How much will the teachers make? Who will do the teaching? Who will certify the teachers and the information?

Consider that I give CME lectures at my hospital. Lots of regular doctors do. We do it for nearly nothing. We do it as an avocation, not a vocation. But lectures at the home hospital are just a drop in the bucket of CME need. And who is to say that an unpaid Mandrola lecture is worthy? I gave lectures before I read Ben Goldacre. Maybe I misled the herd?

 

Social media — a potential solution?

Perhaps social media can outsource/crowdsource medical education? Social media and the Internet is changing the landscape of learning. Look at theFOAM experience, and PLOS, for instance. In education, look at what Sal Kahnhas done.

 

Medical education is a tough problem. The practice of Medicine depends on the availability of effective medicines and devices. We need industry to educate us about their products. I can’t easily ablate AF without eye-popping technology from Johnson & Johnson.

 

The line separating skepticism from paranoia and nihilism is also blurry. One has to believe that humans, for the most part, are good. Medical thought leaders are no less human than any of us. We are all just ambling along trying to better ourselves first and humanity second. Right?

 

Call me naive, but I believe it’s possible that doctors and patients could be (partially) inoculated against industry manipulation. We can teach ourselves to look at absolute risks, NNT and study design. We can learn from the work of Drs. Harlan Krumholz, Sanjay Kaul, Eric Topol, Ben Goldacre, and many other voices of reason. We can learn to discern quality journalism from hype. Go read my colleagues at heartwire. I challenge you to find industry hype in their reporting.

 

And yes, doctors might even be able to learn from each other, on platforms like this.


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Drugmaker To End Controversial Practice

Drugmaker To End Controversial Practice | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
* GSK scrapping doctor payments for speaking engagements * Ending sales reps' targets globally following U.S.

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Protocolos para gestionar un hangout

Protocolos para gestionar un hangout | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

Como toda herramienta que vayamos a utilizar con un propósito profesional es necesario dotarnos de una lista de normas de uso, una guía de uso de cuáles…


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Miquel Loriz's curator insight, December 6, 2013 12:41 AM

Guía muy completa

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Social Media Marketing for Doctors

Social Media Marketing for Doctors | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

The Internet is a gathering place for information, services, and products. Everyone is taking advantage of social media websites to help promote and sell products. Physicians and other healthcare industry employees can utilize social media to market their services as well. They can also keep in close contact with patients while they are not in the office. Here is some information about how many medical professionals are taking advantage of the marketplace that has been created on social media websites.

Understanding the Average Patient

To understand how medical professionals are using social media websites, you need to understand  the average patient that they see today. A large number of people, long before they ever think about going to a doctor, look up information on how to treat or what they can do to treat their ailments on the internet. They find an answer that will subdue them for the time being and return to their daily lives. If the problem gets worse or does not go away, they will then search out the help of a doctor.

SEO Strategy and Digital Marketing for Medical Professionals

The first thing that this tells you is that Search Engine Optimization for doctors and healthcare professionals, is handled much differently than other industries. The custom content that gets developed with SEO keywords in mind will have to do with the diseases or issues of a patient. Put yourself in the shoes of a chiropractor. When deciding on what custom content and keywords that will work best for your site, you must think about what someone that was suffering from something you treat would ask a search engine. So keywords and content will focus on something like” how to crack your back”, “what causes back pain”, or “how to stop back pain”.

Another Useful Tool

There are much better resources available to medical professionals that can help bring even more quality traffic to your website. By connecting with users and current patients on social media websites, you can build an reputation for yourself and attract a few of the million social network users that log on every day. Something like this is time consuming and takes a lot of dedication. To get the best results, contact adigital marketing firm and discuss with they can do for you.

Social Media Marketing

As the popularity of social media sites grows, so does the popularity of healthcare professionals using the services to advertise. By having someone posting original content to a social media site on a daily basis, you can hopefully attract some customers. If the SEO professional that you hired  is really doing his job, then your would have fresh  and relevant custom content posted on a daily basis that linked back to your website.

The Next Step

Once you have built a website full of custom content rich in keywords, have brought your brand to the world through social media sites, and began to spend time in the online community talking to prospective clients about the things that are bothering them, you should start to see some results from your hard work.

Building and Online Review Strategy

Once you have made an effort to be a member of the social community and start connecting with some of your old clients, you should ask them to leave you a review on your website. If you do not have somewhere that visitors to your site can leave reviews and discuss information, make sure that you do it. You should also print the web address to your site’s little online community on your business card and ask every client you see to leave reviews. Reviews are a powerful tool that can drive sales remarkably. Even though visitors to your website do not know who is posting at all, they trust their advice. This is just another thing that proves just how powerful word of mouth advertisement is.

 

As a medical professional, there are many things you can do online to boost your sales. By creating custom content with key phrases that are relevant to what a medical patience would ask, visitors will come to your site to find information and find themselves a doctor instead. By connecting with your clients on social media websites, you can build an online branding that people are talking about and offers informative and interesting custom content to the world that draws visitors from Google. Finally, by having a review section on your website and your social media site, customers will be more likely to trust you and your work.


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Social Jeanie's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:34 AM

So very true. Online is the new word of mouth advertising.

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The Obsession With Medical Costs Will Turn Mobile Health Apps And Devices Into A Major Growth Industry

The Obsession With Medical Costs Will Turn Mobile Health Apps And Devices Into A Major Growth Industry | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

In the United States alone, health spending places the domestic health care industry among the five or six largest economies in the world.

To lower skyrocketing costs, consumers and the health care industry are looking at a variety of solutions. Increasingly, apps and mobile devices that allow consumers to take charge of their own treatment are seen as ways to start bringing down costs. They are taking health care out of hospitals and doctor's offices, and putting more power in consumer hands.


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Ranjit Kovilinkal's curator insight, November 16, 2013 8:16 PM

Customised healthcare solutions are the key...

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Nanomedicine: The Future of Medicine

Nanomedicine: The Future of Medicine | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
A look at how it works, applications, and advantages of nanomedicine.

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Coursera

Coursera | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
Take free online classes from 80+ top universities and organizations.
Jose Gregorio Noronha lopez's insight:

Health Informatics in the Clouds. Dr. Mark L. Braunstein, MD.

Workload: 5-7 hours/week. Sessions:sep 16th 2013. (9weeks long)
  
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Doctors Who Profit From Radiation Prescribe It More Often, Study Finds

The Government Accountability Office found that many doctors who recommended a common prostate cancer therapy had financial relationships with treatment providers.

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Behavioral Health a Big Focus at Games For Health Conference

Behavioral Health a Big Focus at Games For Health Conference | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
At the recent Games For Health conference a variety of developers and companies displayed their ideas for how gamifying health care could improve health ou

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José Manuel Taboada's curator insight, July 10, 2013 11:28 PM

Gamificación y salud - aplicaciones en salud

Charles Davis's curator insight, August 10, 2013 11:00 AM

Fun Stuff!

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7 recursos 2.0 que te ayudarán a prescribir un link sobre salud a tus pacientes - cuidando.es

7 recursos 2.0 que te ayudarán a prescribir un link sobre salud a tus pacientes - cuidando.es | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
7 recursos 2.0 que te ayudarán a recetar un link sobre salud fiable y de calidad a tus pacientes

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Las publicaciones de la UNESCO, disponibles de forma gratuita como parte de la nueva política de acceso abierto de la Organización

Las publicaciones de la UNESCO, disponibles de forma gratuita como parte de la nueva política de acceso abierto de la Organización | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

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ProfeRed's curator insight, May 29, 2013 7:05 PM

" La UNESCO pondrá sus publicaciones digitales a disposición de millones de personas alrededor del mundo, sin costo y con licencia abierta. Tras la decisión adoptada por el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Organización en abril, la UNESCO se convierte en el primer miembro de las Naciones Unidas en adoptar una política de Acceso Abierto para sus publicaciones. La nueva política significa que cualquier persona podrá descargar, traducir, adaptar, distribuir y volver a compartir las publicaciones y los datos de la UNESCO sin costo alguno.

 

Janis Karklins, Subdirector General de Comunicación e Información de la UNESCO, anunció la nueva política durante la inauguración del Foro de la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información, el 13 de mayo en Ginebra: “Investigadores de todos los países, pero principalmente de países en desarrollo y países menos desarrollados se beneficiarán y capitalizarán el acceso abierto al conocimiento”, dijo. “Nuestra nueva política nos permitirá incrementar la visibilidad, accesibilidad y la rápida distribución de nuestras publicaciones”, agregó. "...

Daniel Jimenez Zulic's curator insight, May 29, 2013 7:45 PM

De importante conocimiento para todos los educadores.

Manuel Pinto's comment, June 2, 2013 5:27 AM
El documento sobre la politica de open acess de UNesco: http://bit.ly/10RlflL
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Mobile Apps for Cancer Patients

Mobile Apps for Cancer Patients | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
I did some research, asked some patients, and read a lot of reviews to get an idea of which mobile apps were helpful for chronic cancer patients.

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Social media should be embraced by health care

Social media should be embraced by health care | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

The intersection of social media and privacy has made an older generation, and even some of my own generation, incredibly uncomfortable. There is talk of present and future consequences. Lost jobs, lost income, civil judgments, loss of respect/embarrassment, even criminal penalties for all that you put online. There is an idea that the blurring of intimate boundaries will come back and bite a whole generation.

 

Being online has responsibilities and consequences, no doubt. But Facebook isn’t going to cost most people a future job or a future election. The social rules are, as we speak, changing in terms of how we judge people for their private lives that they make public. The whole world is using social media and putting themselves out there. Tough to judge someone for your same acts.

That said, if there’s one place there is legitimate consternation over social media it is in health care.

Because those involved in health care and social media have the often near unique opportunities to not only dismiss their own privacy online but to do so for others. Horrific stories are rife. Take this one for example,

William Wells arrived at the emergency room at St. Mary Medical Center in Long Beach on April 9 mortally wounded. The 60-year-old had been stabbed more than a dozen times by a fellow nursing home resident, his throat slashed so savagely he was almost decapitated.

Instead of focusing on treating him, an employee said, St. Mary nurses and other hospital staff did the unthinkable: They snapped photos of the dying man and posted them on Facebook.

It is unfortunate if such scares providers and health systems away from social media like blogs, Facebook and Twitter.

As Ed Bennett comments,

“We already have guidelines; social media is simply another form of communication. It’s no different from e-mail or talking to someone in an elevator,” Bennett said. “The safe advice is to assume anything you put out on a social media site has the potential to be public.”

It’s a form of communication with the potential, as all others, to be abused. But more importantly, it has great potential to further provider-patient discourse and aid in health.

No patient privacy protections will ever be perfect. No patient-provider communication rules will ever absolutely guarantee professionalism and accurate information at all times. But guidelines and rules can limit such problems while furthering patient’s access. That holds no matter the medium.

The proliferation of easy mass communication tools should be embraced by health care, not cowered from. As always there are appropriate and inappropriate uses which health care providers should be counseled on and which should carry rewards and penalties. But just because social media is new shouldn’t make it scary.

 


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Generic vs. Prescription Drugs: Perceptions and Actions - Michele Deutschman | Kantar Media Healthcare Research

Generic vs. Prescription Drugs: Perceptions and Actions - Michele Deutschman | Kantar Media Healthcare Research | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

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eMedToday's curator insight, December 13, 2013 9:54 PM

Certainly underscore the value of direct contact with doctor to influene prescription sales

eMedToday's curator insight, December 13, 2013 9:54 PM

Certainly underscores the value of direct contact with doctor which is best done by digital means

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Here Is How We Know Gardasil Has Not Killed 100 People

Here Is How We Know Gardasil Has Not Killed 100 People | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

 

Forbes commenters keep saying Gardasil has caused 100 deaths. Here is why they are wrong.


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Social Media in HEALTHCARE

Mini-training Prezi Assignment for my HS158, Health Communications and Technology class.

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Healthcare Marketing Tips: How to Engage and Inspire Social Sharing

Healthcare Marketing Tips: How to Engage and Inspire Social Sharing | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

A curious challenge within the art of hospital and healthcare marketing is that large segments of your target audience simply don’t care. They don’t have an immediate need for your services or facility.

 

Individuals with a current or pressing medical need are one thing. But there’s always a significant slice of the people who are not in the market…at the moment. As the well-traveled axiom goes, the challenge is to engage consumers today for solutions they may need tomorrow.

For the sake of this list, let’s assume that your Internet marketing plan has all the fundamental tools—website, blog, social media accounts and the like—a specific plan, and someone who is responsible (and accountable) for regular updates.

 

Here are several tips and ideas to help create engagement, inspire action and encourage social sharing.

 

Interesting content. Material that rises to the level of “only adequate” isn’t going to attract or retain readers. Raise the bar on creative content, and if it isn’t truly relevant or interesting (or if you can’t find an interesting angle), don’t drive people away with boring information.

 

Know your audiences. That’s audiences, plural. You will have more than one, big, generic audience. Although there will be overlaps, drill down to the specifics of exactly who you are talking to, what is relevant to their needs and interests, why you want to reach them, what formats or media reach them best, and precisely what you want them to know.

 

Listen at least as much as you speak. Stay tuned into the conversation, comments and feedback that play into the “voice of the customer.” Support and extend topics and ideas that are of greatest interest among the audience (even if they are a surprise to you.)

 

Keep it fresh with frequent updates. Content gets stale faster than yesterday’s fish, and it’s just as welcome. New and updated content attracts attention, but visitors assume that slow-to-change material holds little or no value. (See “boring,” above.) What’s more, search engines also like regular updates and don’t like static pages.

 

Three useful categories…

Depending on your goals and the platform(s) that you are using, information that fuels engagement, inspires action and/or encourages social sharing can be organized under one or more of these broad headings.

Authoritative advice, direction and/or answers. Audiences appreciate “how-to” information that is practical, easy to do or follow, and convenient to share with others.Surprising, unusual or little known info. Facts or data that register as unfamiliar to the reader make a mental impression, but they may require evidence or explanation for believability and acceptance. People are eager to share refreshingly different ideas.Open-ended, provocative conversation extenders. This would include direct questions, surveys, calls to action, opinion solicitation, “What do you have to say about this?” entries, or“Who do you know that would appreciate having this?” directions. 

Consider how any given factoid or bit of information might play out under each of these categories and use the approach that gives your info the greatest impact. Also, rotate your work among these approaches in order to give your content variety, and so you are not always giving advice or always asking a question.

 

Engagement is a continuing process that contributes to your branding and ongoing “top-of-mind” messaging. Tell us what we might be missing here. How do you engage your target audience or readers? We’d love to hear what you would add to this list.


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Technical Dr. Inc.'s curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:55 PM
Websites, SEO, Digital marketing, Social Media Profile Management, and more managed by our expert team at Technical Doctor inc. Connect with us to see the possibilities, email at: inquiry@technicaldr.com - Technical Doctor Team
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Hepatitis C, a Silent Killer, Meets Its Match

Hepatitis C, a Silent Killer, Meets Its Match | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
New drugs are close to market that promise complete cures in more people, with shorter courses and fewer side effects. But they will not be cheap.

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ObamaCare Will Make Us Smarter Healthcare Consumers

ObamaCare Will Make Us Smarter Healthcare Consumers | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
ObamaCare is not going to reduce the financial burden of health care for the majority of Americans who are privately insured; rather, the private insurance system is going to continue pushing cost responsibility to consumers.

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Yaampi : La Red Social de Salud (Latinoamérica)

Yaampi : La Red Social de Salud (Latinoamérica) | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
...Recientemente ha sido lanzado al mercado el proyectowww.Yaampi.com, una plataforma online que tiene como objetivos, por una parte ofrecer un entorno de comunidad online exclusivo y orientado a los profesionales de la salud, donde podrán compartir el conocimiento médico sanitario, manteniendo el diálogo, el debate y la investigación con colegas de todo el entorno hispanoamericano y por otra un directorio o guía de profesionales de la salud segmentado por especialidades y zona geográfica, donde los profesionales del sector obtendrán presencia en la red de cara a poder ofrecer sus servicios al mercado y los pacientes contarán con la posibilidad de encontrar profesionales y centros de carácter sanitario. La guía profesional, es una solución orientada a promover las actividades de los profesionales, consultorios, clínicas, sanatorios y resto de empresas del sector. Funciona como guía para integrar de manera gratuita a todos los profesionales que necesitan promover sus servicios médicos y poner en contacto mutuo a los actores más importantes del sistema de salud: el profesional y el paciente.

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Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, August 28, 2013 11:55 AM

Muy buena iniciativa. Está muy en sus inicios aun.

Tiene una versión PRO con ventajas adicionales, aunque la parte gratuita bien vale el registro. 

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The principles of learning | Internet Time Blog

The principles of learning | Internet Time Blog | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it

he Institute for Research on Learning developed sevenPrinciples of Learning that provide important guideposts for organizations. These are not “Tablets from Moses.” They are not a mantra. Not a dogma. Rather, they are the principles that we kept bumping into during our anthropological studies of how people learn. 


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Amgen Drug Faces Challenge

Amgen Drug Faces Challenge | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
A blockbuster drug made by Amgen is no more effective than a cocktail of cheaper generic therapies in treating a severe joint disease affecting an estimated 1.3 million Americans, according to a new study funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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Richard Meyer's curator insight, June 12, 2013 4:13 AM

The findings could prompt changes in the way physicians treat patients, potentially saving significant amounts of money, although some researchers suggested that current treatments may be too well entrenched to be dislodged.

Amgen's Enbrel, which had global sales of $4.23 billion last year, and similar biologic drugs are often prescribed to treat rheumatoid arthritis after patients have failed to respond to a generic drug called methotrexate, which is the most commonly used front-line therapy.

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Cancer: By the numbers

Cancer: By the numbers | Pharma Market, Health & New | Scoop.it
This year's 26th annual National Cancer Survivors Day is Sunday.

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