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Top 10 Tips for Social Media Success in Healthcare

Top 10 Tips for Social Media Success in Healthcare | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it

1)  Become a thought leader
Provide consumers with industry knowledge and become a resource for up-to-date information. Being a thought leader means you have authority in your industry and will be sought out for the consistent, relevant information you provide. Using a company blog is a great way to showcase thought leadership.

2)  Get your employees involved
Have your C-suite execs – even if they use a ghostwriter – get on board with a business social media account for themselves. They will help build your brand and be a reputable resource for information. People like to have direct access to C-suite execs; it makes them feel empowered to have that access. If employees use social media on behalf of the company, be sure to have a social media policy in place to protect your brand.

3)  Support Customer Service
Practice social listening to know exactly what your followers want from your social media. Employees who use social media on the company’s behalf are engaging with potential and current consumers and need to provide exceptional customer service. Customer service on social media, also called “social care,” not only includes responding to positive (and negative) reviews, but also doing simple tasks like retweeting a consumer’s tweet. This kind of engagement shows you're listening and care about your consumers, and is especially true in the B2B environment.

4)  Monitor social mentions and Google Alerts for your company and its competitors
See what people around the web are saying about you. Social media has moved to web 2.0 and companies now have little or no control over organic representation. By tracking social media mentions and setting up Google Alerts, you can find where you’ve been mentioned on the web, which will give you an opportunity to actively engage those referencing you, or respond to any potential negative situations involving your company.

Keep up with what your competitors are doing by monitoring social mentions and setting up Google Alerts for them, as well. This way, you can see what your competitors are up to and what new tools they have, and use that information to discover ways you can continue to be competitive.

5)  Use Facebook for B2B Outreach
Contrary to popular belief, Facebook is great for B2B companies because your target companies primarily use Facebook to reach their consumers, meaning your consumers are on Facebook. Wherever your target audience is on social media, you should be there, too. Create a Facebook page for your business and be sure to post at least once a day. Use A/B testing to determine what time of day is the best to post. Healthcare companies selling to hospitals will find Facebook to be a beneficial platform, as hospitals are present to connect with their potential patients.

6)  Try A/B Testing
Use different posts, different sites, and post at different times and compare your results to see which gets more engagement. Facebook has a good analytics feature (once you have more than 25 fans) that will show you the time of day your fans are on Facebook. For the most engagement potential, you want to be sure your posts are right in front of your fans and the easiest way to do that is to post when most of your fans are online.

7)  Get engaged with your audience
Engagement through social media means your posts received interaction from your followers. Interactions with your followers increase your reach, which represents the number of people who saw your post. If a follower engages with your post, there is potential for all of that person’s connections to also see your post. Increased exposure is exactly what we want. Typically, engagement can be increased by you making the first move. Make deliberate attempts to like your followers’ posts, retweet their posts, or respond to their posts. As always, if anyone responds to your post, or shares, or likes, be sure to reply back or say thank you!

If you’re interested in gaining more followers, a good idea would be to host a tweet chat. A tweet chat is an online chat conducted on Twitter where anyone can join and discuss a predetermined topic by following a chat-specific #hashtag. Not only will these tweet chats get you engagement, it will also help you gain exposure and set yourself up as a thought leader.

8)  Create a personality behind the social media handles
Set yourself apart from your competitors by infusing personality into your content and social posts. People generally do not like to follow businesses on social media when all of their posts are salesy, which gets old and boring. Create a life behind the Twitter handle or Facebook name and let your followers know there is an actual human being behind the content. Be relatable to your audience and create relationships, just as you would in person.

9)  What I use to analyze results
Twitter & Pinterest have the most engagement with my target audience. Hootsuite is a good platform for utilizing multiple social sites within one location. The right tool and social platform for your business is really up to your industry. Try using A/B testing to find which is the best for you.

10)  Have fun!
Use the creative social atmosphere to your advantage. Social media has a creative atmosphere that gives you potential to stand out from your competitors. Use it! Be tasteful and be professional, but be fun, too.



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The Governance Advisory Practice's curator insight, September 30, 2014 5:23 AM

If you're an NHS communications lead, or a director, read this!

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Twitter in healthcare - Statistics

Twitter in healthcare - Statistics | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it

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Senior, Personnes Agées & Silver Economie's curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:21 AM

add your insight...


Ignacio Fernández Alberti's curator insight, September 30, 2014 2:13 PM

agregar su visión ...

Barbara Letscher's curator insight, October 2, 2014 4:45 AM

Très bonne infographie, claire, sourcée, intéressante. Où l'on voit bien tout l'intérêt de suivre ce qui circule sur les réseaux sociaux à propos d'un produit ! Chez Takeda, il y a des actions à mener par exemple...

Et vous, vous suivez ?

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To Gather Drug Data, a Health Start-Up Turns to Consumers

To Gather Drug Data, a Health Start-Up Turns to Consumers | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Iodine has used online surveys to compile data on Americans’ experiences while taking prescription medications, intending to help other prospective users educate themselves.

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Novartis Investing in $49 Billion mHealth market - Healthcare Social Media India

Novartis Investing in $49 Billion mHealth market - Healthcare Social Media India | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Novartis currently has 13 iPhone apps in Apple's App Store, and nine of them are designed for patients and consumers. Some, like "Sickel Cell Iron Invaders (Novartis Investing in $49 Billion mHealth...

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Digital health: A way for pharma companies to be more relevant in healthcare

Digital health: A way for pharma companies to be more relevant in healthcare | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Digital health technology can help pharma companies deliver a better experience for patients, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce the total cost of care.

Via Olivier Delannoy, eMedToday
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Getting the most out of social media

Getting the most out of social media | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it


Social media represents a game-changing tool for improving patient care, supporting education, and enhancing visibility, but imaging professionals must be aware of the potential pitfalls and be trained in how to use it both effectively and safely. That's the view of Dr. Erik Ranschaert, staff radiologist at the Jeroen Bosch teaching hospital, s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands.

National and international radiology societies, including the European Society of Radiology (ESR) and RSNA, have now realized how important social media is to improve engagement of congress attendees. In addition, they are leveraging this technique to improve congress participation. ESR now has more than 160,000 Facebook members, many of them coming from Asia, and this figure is nearly three times the number of its actual members.

Radiologists must learn how to use social media correctly, said Dr. Erik Ranschaert.

A study from the MedData Group in 2014 on how doctors use social media revealed that 56% use it professionally, the majority to keep up with the latest developments in their own discipline and to exchange with peers. Other reasons include marketing their practice and establishing themselves as thought leaders. Nevertheless, common concerns remain patient and personal privacy, questions of liability, and finding time to fully engage with social media.

Twitter can solve the problem of too little time, but privacy issues are an ongoing consideration despite guidelines from professional groups such as the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Dutch Federation of Doctors, KNMG.

Key to professional integrity -- and avoiding prosecution -- is identity separation; doctors using Facebook [FB], for example, should limit public access to their personal pages. Similarly, privacy settings should be adjusted depending on the nature of a post, whether for a closed circle of colleagues about specific cases, or for general subjects destined for nonmedical friends.

"Privacy settings are important as they determine who can see what I post. Doctors should determine what is appropriate," said Ranschaert, who addressed social media trends in radiology and how the radiologist can use social media in daily practice, in two presentations at last week's Update in Medical Imaging congress, held in Bruges, Belgium.

Click image to enlarge.
Source: 2014 report from MedData Group. All figures courtesy of Dr. Erik Ranschaert.

"It is so easy to track private individuals and link them to their professional profiles that doctors should be careful to limit access to their personal webspace," he said. "Online action and content posted may potentially damage reputations or even end careers so doctors need to learn how to clearly draw the barrier between private and professional life."

According to a 2012 PowerDMS study published on Pinterest, 87% of doctors accessed social media sites for personal use. Specifically, 61% of doctors questioned used FB in a personal capacity, and one-third of these reported receiving patient friend invitations.

"As it is cumbersome to always get the balance right using privacy settings, the best solution in my opinion is to make a separate professional and personal FB page or to keep FB personal and other sites professional, for example," he noted.

PowerDMS study on how physicians use social media.

Furthermore, even when exchanging with colleagues, confidentiality and patient privacy should be at the forefront of the radiologist's mind when posting.

"The CT image of the Brazilian footballer Neymar Jr.'s lumbar spine fracture, which in the event turned out to be a hoax, nevertheless went viral, highlighting several issues -- can radiologists trust the source? Is the data anonymized? And do they have permission from the patient to post an image?" Ranschaert said.

Social media sites have grown exponentially since 2006, with 74% of all online adults using them. Like doctors, patients access them for a number of reasons. In the same study, 30% used such sites to support them with healthcare problems, while 15% to 16% used them to review doctors. There was also a tendency to trust the information that doctors provided on the Internet, which radiologists need to be aware of when posting, according to Ranschaert.

Furthermore, radiologists need to keep abreast of new applications of social media in daily practice to fully exploit it. This list of applications is growing, according to Ranschaert, who pointed to scientific networking through sites like ResearchGate and BiomedExperts, and the sharing of documents (or "social bookmarking") through sites such as Pinterest.

Types of social media.

"The advantage is that it makes radiologists more visible as they gain direct access to patients, which helps to dispel the old stereotype of the remote radiologist sitting in the dark," he noted. "In this way it is a great equalizer among the disciplines and this 'collective brain' can provide radiologists -- and patients -- with many opportunities."

One application is crowdsourcing for medical information, as exemplified by Crowdmed, a tool developed in California through which patients can publish symptoms as well as reports and medical images, and invite doctors to solve their problem, while sophisticated algorithms will also generate the most likely diagnosis.

"Any radiologist can participate in this type of out-loud public thinking and we shouldn't ignore such an important patient-driven tool. Instead, we need to reflect on these new ways of interacting with patients and colleagues. For applications like CrowdMed, we need to establish added value and cost-effectiveness," he said.

With the development of Web 2.0, the capacity to create and exchange user-generated information over the World Wide Web has revolutionized communication between organizations and individuals. Forums, discussion groups, blogs, and social networks have largely replaced traditional electronic communication. In the medical domain, exciting new applications of social media are making healthcare increasingly participatory and patient-friendly, while patients and doctors share increasing volumes of personal and professional data through social media sites such as FB, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Inside Crowdmed.

Ranschaert also points to the expansion of electronic files available online to the patient that is starting to raise other questions such as how reports should be written.

"In Belgium, radiology patients can access their images online with a code, and soon reports will most likely be accessed in the same way. Patients using CrowdMed can already anonymize and post their radiological reports along with their images, so there is no return!" Ranschaert said. "We need to ask how these reports should be formulated: In two parts, one destined for medical colleagues and the other part for the patient? Or in one piece but written in a way to allow any patient to understand it?"

Several hospitals already make reports available online for patients. He is concerned that there appears to be no real consensus about this topic, and patients can read medical information -- without getting a lay-language explanation -- even if it is bad news. No support is available, and some radiologists are receiving phone calls from patients with questions about their results, because they can find it online before they go back to their treating physician.

The dilemma for radiologists and hospitals is whether they should create a FB page where patients can ask questions, or whether they should make online consultations possible, Ranschaert noted.

Despite the cautionary tales of malpractice prosecutions due to doctors using social media at inappropriate times, the phenomenon looks as though it is here to stay. "Discussion of how to handle social media should be opened up within professional societies such as ESR and radiologists should learn how to safely harness it, not just to their own advantage, but also to their patients'," he said.


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Social Media Fever Slow to Spread Among Doctors

Social Media Fever Slow to Spread Among Doctors | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it

Don’t expect the doctor to diagnose you via social media anytime soon. A June 2014 study by MedData Group found that 44% of US physicians still weren’t using social media sites for professional purposes.

Among doctors who were social networking as part of their job, profession-related sites were the platforms of choice. Around one-third of respondents used LinkedIn, and 29% were active on online physician communities, compared with just 3% who used online patient portals. Social sites that tend to be popular among the general public also saw low usage.

Avoiding social media wasn’t due to a lack of knowledge, with less than one-quarter of doctors saying they didn’t use such platforms because they weren’t familiar with them. Instead, patient privacy and a lack of time were the leading reasons US physicians said they stayed away from using social networks for professional purposes.

Q1 2014 polling by Digital Insights Group found that the general consensus among physicians was that social just wasn’t an important resource when it came to doing their jobs. Just 14% of US primary care physicians said that social networks were a somewhat or very important clinical resource, compared with 30% who said they weren’t important at all.

When doctors do turn to digital resources to make decisions, they’re most likely using search engines, according to April 2014 research also conducted by MedData Group. Among US physicians surveyed, a whopping 78% said search engines were the online resource they used in the medical decision-making process. Meanwhile, just 5% cited social media.



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Internet améliorerait la relation patient-soignant

Internet améliorerait la relation patient-soignant | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Un nouveau sondage affirme que 94% des Français estiment bonnes leurs relations avec le personnel soignant. Internet serait également plutôt bénéfique lors des entretiens médicaux.

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Physicians To Pharmas: Provide Patient Services Or Face Irrelevance - Manhattan Research

New Manhattan Research Study from Decision Resources Group Helps Marketers Understand How Physicians Are Using Multichannel Information and Services from Pharma

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Pharma needs to engage more digitally with docs

Pharma needs to engage more digitally with docs | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it

The pharmaceutical industry needs to engage much more in the digital space with healthcare professionals and “provide clear, concise brand and product messages which can be easily shared across digital channels”.

That is one of the major conclusions of a new report from research specialist Cello Health Insight carried out amongst physicians across the UK, including 300 GPs. The study did find, however, that whilst the use of digital resources has grown substantially amongst HCPs over the past five years, face-to-face interactions still carry the biggest weight.


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Where (in the Human Body) Venture Capital Is Going

Where (in the Human Body) Venture Capital Is Going | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
A look at the organs and maladies that are attracting the most interest of startups and venture-capital investors. Hint: Think aging baby boomers.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine , Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Navigating the pitfalls of social media in the Pharma Industry

Navigating the pitfalls of social media in the Pharma Industry | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it


The following article is based on the CIPR Social Media Panel c-suite Podcast that I produced a couple of months ago, which can still be listened to here.

Social media can prove a minefield for pharma companies trying to find the best path through industry rules and regulations, but integrating new, relevant marketing strategies is a must to reach increasingly digital-savvy patients

According to the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics’ Engaging Patients through Social Media report, the top 100 Wikipedia pages for healthcare topics were accessed, on average, 1.9 million times over the last year, with tuberculosis coming top at 4.2 million views.

Given Wikipedia is, according to an article in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, the most used online healthcare resource globally, it is important to know what information patients are finding when they get there and how the pharma industry can improve it.

Misleading the Public?

In June of this year, The New England Journal of Medicine investigated this exact issue by studying the content of healthcare-related Wikipedia pages identifying safety warnings for 22 prescription drugs that are indicated for a range of clinical conditions. Collectively, those drugs had triggered 13 million searches on Google and five million Wikipedia page views annually during their study period. FDA safety warnings were associated with an 82% increase, on average, in Google searches for the drugs during the week after the announcement, and a 175% increase in views of Wikipedia pages for the drugs on the day of the announcement – but they found 23% of Wikipedia pages were updated more than two weeks after the FDA warning was issued, and 36% of pages remained unchanged more than one year later (as of January 2014).

The potential for Wikipedia pages to mislead the public is further highlighted by Dr Mark Hooper, Director at Conversis Medical, who uses the example of the film The Constant Gardner, based on a book by John le Carré, where the plot involves a clinical trial. Hooper explains that the film includes deaths, shooting and mayhem, and is nothing like any clinical trial he has ever seen. However, when he looked up information about the film on Wikipedia, he found that the page asserted it was based on a real event which took place in Nigeria.

It was claimed that eleven patients had died, implying this was as a direct result of the trial, when in fact the trial had actually compared a new drug for meningitis with the best established treatment available at the time. Six patients died while on the current medication, while five died using the new treatment, which, Hooper emphasises, is not claimed as a significant improvement, but neither is it worse. He has since updated the page to ensure it offers a fair account of the facts, but he believes the wider pharma industry must ensure all updates on Wikipedia are accurate, particularly as the site is such a useful way to disseminate information.

Patient Empowerment

Gill Hayes, Global Director of Communications for R&D at AstraZeneca, agrees, and believes that in drug development, anything that prompts a conversation between a doctor and a patient is a good thing, referring specifically to the public self-diagnosing through online searches. While she believes that there are holes in how Wikipedia is put together, using it as a stimulus for getting people to engage with their GP and question why they are being recommended a certain treatment is good patient empowerment.

Of course, there are plenty of other websites where patients can gain information, including WebMD, which the FDA actually partnered with back in 2008 to expand access to timely and reliable information for consumers, while in the UK, the NHS offers the public a symptom checkers website. But Christian Gardner, Director of Media Services at pharmaphorum.com and former Digital Communications Managerat AstraZeneca, states that the IMS report indicates people trust Wikipedia, and believes that pharma companies have a responsibility to contribute to the content on the site. After all, he adds, patients are actually very unlikely to go directly to their corporate websites.

However, at the moment, Gardner believes that Big Pharma regulations restrict their employees from contributing to Wikipedia, as by doing so they would essentially be updating the page on behalf of the company – thereby requiring various levels of approval. On the other hand, he is quick to point out that this is a huge opportunity; after all, the pharma industry has the experts and scientists who can engage with healthcare professionals, and who are best-placed to provide informed opinion.

So outside of the big information sites, what more can pharma companies do to engage directly with patients through social media applications such as blogs, forums, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn?

Growing Acceptance

Gardner believes that while the rules and regulations involved in engaging with patients through social media can make it a minefield for pharma companies, it is not impossible to come up with a successful marketing strategy. However, many are slow on the uptake – possibly due to the fact that measuring the effectiveness and return on investment of social media, as well as regulatory concerns, were both listed by 78% of health and pharma executives worldwide as their leading hurdle to social media adoption.[1] But this situation seems to be changing.

KPMG’s Transforming healthcare: From volume to value report indicates that pharma executives expect their promotional activity will become much more technology-based, with 43% of them expecting to increase their communication to promote products through social media. At the same time, according to research by Accenture last year, over half of pharmaceutical executives list mastering multi-channel marketing and improving digital effectiveness within their top strategic priorities.

Gardner thinks there is a growing acceptance within the pharma industry that social media is becoming so central to communications, and is increasingly being considered in terms of budget, size of team and required resources, that we are now seeing a real growth of acceptance more generally. When Gardner was at AstraZeneca, he formed part of a team that was led with that mindset – one project he became involved with was the launch of an external science blog called Lab Talk, which was seen as a big step at the time as it meant opening up to engagement, but also brought additional responsibility as another channel to monitor and manage. However, his team succeeded in getting the site live due to the genuine support and buy-in they had from the leadership, who opened doors with the regulatory and legal teams and pulled together approval models that helped channel work and made their jobs much easier.

Regulatory Compliance

But as pharma companies look to engage with patients through social media, great care must be taken in what is published online, even if they believe they have followed the correct procedures. For example, the IMS report referred to a case in August last year where AstraZeneca had to pull a Twitter campaign from the Associated Press’s Twitter feed. A reference to a prescription drug could be seen if the ‘view summary’ link was selected within the tweet, which redirected to AstraZeneca’s YouTube channel – this resulted in the product name being included without the required safety information, breaching regulations.

The issue of regulatory compliance is understandably confusing for patients. In the US, the FDA allows pharma companies to market directly to patients, but the rules are very different under the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) in the UK and EMA in Europe, and information is easily accessible through social media whatever territory you may be in. While Gardner cannot ever foresee a merging of global regulations, he does believe the ABPI needs to advocate good examples of social media practice, sharing innovative but compliant examples from pharma companies.

Adverse Drug Reactions

Another important area that the IMS paper discussed was the major legal challenge faced by pharma companies around adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting, as they are obligated to declare all known ADRs to regulators for the purpose of drug safety. The report went on to explain that if a company is monitoring social media channels, then it may also become responsible for reporting ADRs that come to light through this medium. However, by not actually having a formal social media strategy in place, companies can avoid this regulatory burden.

Gardner explains that if a pharma company is not using Facebook to talk directly to patients, then monitoring it is not their responsibility; but if they do, they must monitor all activity 24 hours a day, responding when necessary with information such as how the patient can get in touch in an emergency.

Language Barriers

Speed of response is another hurdle to overcome, especially when dealing on a global level, as information needs to be distributed in the appropriate languages for each country. Coupled with this is the fact that social media has created a new language of its own, with shortened words that are not so easily translatable or localised.

Dr Hooper, whose company, Conversis Medical, specialises in translation and localisation in the pharma sector, stresses that, in urgent situations, or when crisis communications are taking place, companies should still use professionals – ideally local translators – who can provide regional expertise, while keeping control centralised. This means ensuring that urgent social media updates are translated by people rather than via free online translation tools.

Reaching Out

As for the future, Gardner believes that with the right digital listening tools, there is a real opportunity to go far beyond responses to ADR, as patients share a great deal of information online about how they access drugs and what their experiences are in taking them.

He believes that better patient engagement is crucial, but he also feels that social media can provide pharma executives more air time, giving their companies more credibility and personality – just as the rise of online video has done in the last few years. This still applies even if it is necessary to enlist the support of a communications team.

Naturally, there may be concern over the fact that the more senior management shares information, the potential for protest groups to reach them increases, but these are challenges that need to be overcome if the pharma industry really wants to embrace this opportunity to engage their patients.


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Making patient engagement meaningful (to the doctor) | mHealthNews

Making patient engagement meaningful (to the doctor) | mHealthNews | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
he popular theory these days is that consumers with chronic health conditions want to take more control over their healthcare, and they'll be using mHealth tools to do just that.

Glen Tullman disagrees.

"They don't want to be engaged," the mHealth venture capitalist and former Allscripts CEO says. "They want to be able to live their lives. … The last thing that people with any kind of chronic condition need is one more thing to do."

Tullman has launched a new mHealth company to back up his words, and he's targeting the fast-growing diabetes market that's now dominated by the likes of Glooko and Telcare. His company, Livongo (LIve ON the GO) Health, debuted its FDA-cleared interactive blood-glucose monitor and corresponding cloud-based analytics platform at TechCrunch DISRUPT earlier this month in San Francisco.

Tullman, serving as the company's CEO, has a personal stake in the industry – a college-aged son who's a type 1 diabetic. He sees today's mHealth landscape heading in the wrong direction in treating people with chronic conditions. They don’t want to be asked to do more to manage their healthcare, he says – they want mHealth solutions that will manage their health for them. He calls it "rethinking the way we currently manage diabetes."

"We don't want them to do more – we want them to do less," he said. "What we can do is empower them."

Livongo's product consists of a touchscreen device that serves as a blood glucose monitor, pedometer and two-way link to the cloud-based platform, which offers analytics and real-time monitoring and support. A user need only test his or her blood sugar, and the device and cloud will do the rest. The user can share information with a select group of caregivers, from doctors to parents to friends, and ask for and receive advice as often or as infrequently as necessary. The analytics platform, meanwhile, processes blood sugar readings, diet and exercise to chart the user's health, issue alerts when there's a concern and provide useful tips on health management.

Tullman says the Livongo platform is ideal for healthcare providers "who don't want to be data geeks." It pulls them into the consumer's orbit only when necessary – when the consumer has a question or the data indicates an intervention is needed – and that's it.

This targets one of the enduring challenges in today's healthcare landscape: patient engagement. Tullman doesn't like the phrase, because it connotes more intervention by a provider than might be needed. The idea is to enable someone with a chronic condition to live as normal of a life as possible, with minimum interventions, and to give doctors the freedom to provide health management only when necessary. This adds value to the provider's time, and reduces waste.

The company, which received financial backing from 7wire Ventures (the Chicago-based venture capital firm run by Tullman and longtime collaborator Lee Shapiro) and General Catalyst Partners, has been beta testing its platform at the University of Massachusetts and the University of South Florida, and is partnering with HealthCare Partners, one of the country's larger managed care networks.

According to Tullman, three-quarters of the patients who have used Livongo in the beta tests said they'd pay to keep it after the project concluded.

Calling Livongo "a promising new technology," David Harlan, MD, director of the Diabetes Center of Excellence at UMass Memorial Medical Center, said in in a press release that the product was "well received by our patients with diabetes and also provided more data and information than our clinicians have ever had before."

Related articles: 

Vicious circle: IT sets BYOD and social media parameters, users disagree

mHealth masters: Harry Greenspun on the promise of applied analytics

Topics: Innovation, Clinical, Consumer


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Ginny Dillon's curator insight, September 17, 2014 1:36 PM

Livingo founder says patients with diabetes don't want to do more, they want to do less so they can live their lives. For doctors. The question remains, will the app empower diabetics, help them control blood sugar and result in less need to contact their physician or healthcare provider?

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E-santé : les géants de l'Internet bien placés pour dominer le marché

E-santé : les géants de l'Internet bien placés pour dominer le marché | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Le marche de l'e-santé, lié à la collecte de données individuelles, risque d'être dominé d'ici 5 ans, par les géants de l'Internet.« Les entreprises de l'internet seront les acteurs non seulement gagnants, mais en plus incontournables pour les fournisseurs de soins, de médicaments et de dispositifs médicaux en matière de e-santé » a estimé Patrick Biecheler, responsable du secteur pharmacie de Roland Berger lors de la présentation de l'étude intitulée « E-santé : des acteurs inattendus, quelle évolution du modèle commercial ? » .Le marché de l'e-santé connaîtrait, pourtant, des débuts plutôt laborieux. Selon l'étude, les opérateurs télécoms étaient bien placés pour dominer ce marché, mais ceux-ci ont échoué et « ne reviendront pas » selon Patrick Biecheler.A contrario, les acteurs de l'internet, qui s'y sont également intéressés sans réussite, font aujourd'hui une réapparition, avec des moyens accrus.« La combinaison de moyens humains, scientifiques et d'une capacité (...) à capturer la donnée et à être capables de l'analyser vont faire d'eux les incontournables de l'e-santé », a-t-il estimé.L'étude brosse un paysage foisonnant des acteurs de l'écosystème sur le marché de l'e-santéL'analyste de Roland Berger a notamment pris l'exemple de Google qui a créé Calico, une entreprise dédiée à la santé (officiellement, elle s'occupe du vieillissement et des maladies associées).Pour y parvenir, les partenariats seront fondamentaux à la fois avec des fabricants de smartphones ou éditeurs d'application, permettant de collecter des données (Samsung, Apple), des fournisseurs de soins et des organismes payeurs (notamment les assurances), selon l'étude.Mais les différents acteurs vont devoir toucher les bonnes populations, notamment les personnes âgées peu utilisatrices de nouvelles technologies. L'étude pointe également un risque de résistance des patients voire des médecins plutôt que du régulateur ou du payeu" face à la collecte et l'usage des données de santé.

Le cabinet Roland Berger table sur une croissance du marché de l'e-santé en France de 2,4 milliard d'euros en 2012 à environ 3,4 milliards en 2017, soit 7% par an.


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LE ROUX Arnaud's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:37 PM

Les géants de l'internet, futurs acteurs majeurs de la E-Santé ...  @degetel #DegetelSanté

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2 pharma LinkedIn company pages that rock

2 pharma LinkedIn company pages that rock | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Good LinkedIn company pages are few and far between. In fact, bad ones are few and far between as well! Most companies simply don’t seem to bother completing the basic information on them, let alone updating them frequently.
It’s a big mistake. LinkedIn has by far the biggest visitor-to-conversion rate of any of the major social media platforms, and a good company page is a terrific way to showcase everything your company is good at. If you don’t have a company page, your business doesn’t exist on LinkedIn (and it doesn’t matter if every employee has their own profile; these are personal pages, highlighting personal achievements, and not about the company). 
Take the pharmaceutical industry in the UK. I set out to write a post highlighting three examples of great company pages – but couldn’t find enough to write it!
There are two possible reasons. One is that pharma is generally behind the curve when it comes to social media. But LinkedIn is the one platform where its executives generally do have a strong presence, so one might have expected them to develop their company pages.

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10 Reasons Your Prescription Drug Prices Are So Painfully High

10 Reasons Your Prescription Drug Prices Are So Painfully High | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Research and development costs are only one piece of the puzzle. Here are nine additional reasons why your prescription drug costs are so painfully high. - Sean Williams - Health Care

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Pfizer takes to Tumblr to share employee stories - PMLiVE

Pfizer takes to Tumblr to share employee stories - PMLiVE | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it

New blog promotes their contributions to health


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No silver bullet, but a growing arsenal for pharma comms

No silver bullet, but a growing arsenal for pharma comms | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Pharmafile.com is a leading portal for the pharmaceutical industry, providing industry professionals with pharma news, jobs, events, and service company listings.

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Découverte d'une molécule qui multiplie les cellules souches

Découverte d'une molécule qui multiplie les cellules souches | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Une nouvelle molécule ouvrirait la voie à davantage de transplantations de ces cellules pour soigner leucémies, myélomes et lymphomes.

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Online Social Networking Linked to Use of Web for Health Info

Online Social Networking Linked to Use of Web for Health Info | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it


KEY POINTS

  • People who use social networking sites are more likely to seek health information online.
  • People with a chronic disease or a loved one with a chronic disease were more likely to search for disease-specific information.
  • Women and people with higher incomes were more likely than men and people with lower incomes to use social networking sites.


The use of social networking sites may have implications for accessing online health information, finds a new longitudinal study from the Journal of Health Communication.

“Socioeconomic and demographic factors that lead to the disparities in social networking sites could also contribute to disparities in seeking health information online,” said the study’s lead author, Yang Feng, Ph.D., associate professor in the department of communication studies at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise.

“People who are active users of social networking sites may tend to be active online health information seekers. With the growth of social networking, the relationship between their use and people’s likelihood to seek health information online was more obvious in 2010 than in 2008 and 2006.”

Researchers analyzed data collected from phone interviews of 2,928 adults who took part in the Health Tracking Surveys from the Pew Internet & American Life Project during 2006, 2008 and 2010. The surveys asked participants whether they used the Internet; used social networking sites such as Facebook; whether they searched for health information online, including information about a specific disease, medical treatment or doctors; and whether or not they or someone close to them had a chronic disease.

The researchers found significant disparities in use of social networking sites and the tendency to search for health information online. In all three years of the survey, age was the most significant factor in social networking site use, with younger people more likely to use them than older people. In 2010, women and people with higher incomes were more likely than men and people with lower incomes to use social networking sites.

Additionally, in 2008 and 2010, having a chronic disease and use of online social networking predicted people’s likelihood of seeking information about a specific disease or medical condition online. In 2010, after controlling for demographic factors, people who used social networking sites were 131 percent more likely to seek information about a specific disease or medical problem online than people who did not use social media.

Older people were less likely to search for information about a specific treatment or doctor online. Non-Whites were less likely to search online for disease or treatment information. As expected, people with a chronic disease or a person close to them with a chronic disease were more likely to look for disease-specific information online but no more likely to search for information on doctors or hospitals.

“Even though social networking sites have grown over the years, some social groups, such as older men with low incomes and minorities, are not fully engaged with social networking and are less likely to obtain health information through these sites. Yet, we may still lack customized health education programs to target these people.  This study helps to identify those social groups who are not making good use of social networking sites throughout the years,” noted Feng.

Ajay Sethi, Ph.D., associate professor in the department of population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, agreed with the study’s findings but noted, “Whenever a new technology or intervention is introduced to a population, the early adopters are typically distinct from the late or never adopters.”

The volume of information on diseases and conditions on the Internet is huge compared to the number of websites that review doctors and hospitals and those websites. “Those sites, pertaining to providers tends to be buried,” said Sethi. “A Google search of a hospital name, for example, will bring up lots of links, and if you add ‘review’ you’ll probably pull up mostly anonymous individuals.”

He suggested healthcare providers ought to ask their patients, in a non-accusatory way where they get their information. “That can spark a discussion as to what is credible and what may not be. Many health care systems offer links to health websites through their own site or provide informational pages for patients.”

TERMS OF USE: This story is protected by copyright. When reproducing any material, including interview excerpts, attribution to the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, is required. While the information provided in this news story is from the latest peer-reviewed research, it is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment recommendations. For medical questions or concerns, please consult a health care provider.

For More Information:

Reach the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, at (202) 387-2829 or hbns-editor@cfah.org

Yang Feng & Wenjing Xie (2014): Digital Divide 2.0: The Role of Social Networking Sites in Seeking Health Information Online From a Longitudinal Perspective, Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives, DOI:10.1080/10810730.2014.906522


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Digital Pharma Marketing: Overview and the Need To Build Integrated D…

Get exclusive access to Whitepaper (it’s free). Sign up here: http://eepurl.com/3Idrb (What do you know about #Digital #Pharma #Marketing?

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Les géants de l'électronique plus séduisants que les laboratoires pharmaceutiques ?

Les géants de l'électronique plus séduisants que les laboratoires pharmaceutiques ? | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
Choc des cultures entre ancienne et nouvelle économie, les géants du numérique se présentent désormais comme des rivaux de taille pour les grands laboratoires pharmaceutiques. Un membre du conseil d'administration du groupe suisse Roche vient ainsi de quitter ses fonctions pour se concentrer sur son poste de PDG de Calico, la société de Google dans la santé, qui vient tout juste d'annoncer son premier investissement en partenaria

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MHealth Conference: How can mobile technology improve health in low and middle income countries 

MHealth Conference: How can mobile technology improve health in low and middle income countries  | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it
IGH Main (RT UCLGlobalHealth: Save the date: #MHealth Conference: How can mobile technology improve health in low and midd...

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Opportunities abound for mHealth in Africa

Opportunities abound for mHealth in Africa | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it

Africa presents a unique opportunity for those who wish to pioneer mHealth or mobile technology healthcare solutions on the continent.

Mobile cellular subscribersAfrica presents an interesting opportunity for mobile health. PHOTO: TechHealth Perspectives

This is according to Doctor Harry Greenspun, a director at the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, who believes that healthcare in Africa could follow suit behind the continent’s unique adaptation to telecommunications technology.

(READ MORE: The changing face of Africa's healthcare sector)

“Africa presents a really interesting opportunity for mobile health which is different from other parts of the world. If you look at some of the more developed countries in the world, the opportunity in Africa is really around using mHealth as the basis for healthcare infrastructure,” Greenspun told CNBCafrica.com.

“In healthcare, as countries develop more sophisticated healthcare delivery systems, they’re not going to model it on the old-fashioned bricks and mortar type-of healthcare system. They’re going to be using technology in order to provide better access, better quality, better safety at a lower cost.”

HEALTHCARE INFRASTRUCTURE

Greenspun also stated that an increased use of mobile healthcare solutions would be able to service those who live in inaccessible areas.

“If you think about the way healthcare’s traditionally delivered, you need facilities, you need trained people, as opposed to a lot of the ways healthcare is delivered in Africa, where it is often delivered in the homes and in the community,” he said.

“The spread and adoption of mobile devices opens the door to use these as the healthcare infrastructure, to bring better information to individuals, provide specialist care, remote monitoring to do remote diagnosis. [By] connecting people via phones, you can create infrastructure.”

SAFETY AND SECURITY

He added that as a result of this need, there is a lot of innovation in the use of mobile and other devices to provide a higher level of care and emphasised the need to provide healthcare solutions in the safest and most secure way possible.

(WATCH VIDEO: Trends that create variance to healthcare in Africa)

“There’s always a concern about privacy and security so establishing trust is going to be very important. It has to be done in a safe way with the right safeguards or training. You have to match the level of care with the ability for the people on the other end to be able to take advantage of it,” he explained.

“There is a lot of interest in mobile health in Africa because people recognise that it’s going to be important for public health. The important thing for people to understand is there are differences between how mobile gets deployed in the industrialised world versus the opportunity to improve healthcare in the developing world.”


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Online social networking linked to use of web for health info - Medical Xpress

Online social networking linked to use of web for health info - Medical Xpress | Pharma and ePharma | Scoop.it

The use of social networking sites may have implications for accessing online health information, finds a new longitudinal study from the Journal of Health Communication.

"Socioeconomic and demographic factors that lead to the disparities in social networking sites could also contribute to disparities in seeking health information online," said the study's lead author, Yang Feng, Ph.D., associate professor in the department of communication studies at the University of Virginia's College at Wise.

"People who are active users of social networking sites may tend to be active online health information seekers. With the growth of social networking, the relationship between their use and people's likelihood to seek health information online was more obvious in 2010 than in 2008 and 2006."

Researchers analyzed data collected from phone interviews of 2,928 adults who took part in the Health Tracking Surveys from the Pew Internet & American Life Project during 2006, 2008 and 2010. The surveys asked participants whether they used the Internet; used social networking sites such as Facebook; whether they searched for health information online, including information about a specific disease, medical treatment or doctors; and whether or not they or someone close to them had a chronic disease.

The researchers found significant disparities in use of social networking sites and the tendency to search for health information online. In all three years of the survey, age was the most significant factor in social networking site use, with younger people more likely to use them than older people. In 2010, women and people with higher incomes were more likely than men and people with lower incomes to use social networking sites.

Additionally, in 2008 and 2010, having a chronic disease and use of online social networking predicted people's likelihood of seeking information about a specific disease or medical condition online. In 2010, after controlling for demographic factors, people who used social networking sites were 131 percent more likely to seek information about a specific disease or medical problem online than people who did not use social media.

Older people were less likely to search for information about a specific treatment or doctor online. Non-Whites were less likely to search online for disease or treatment information. As expected, people with a chronic disease or a person close to them with a chronic disease were more likely to look for disease-specific information online but no more likely to search for information on doctors or hospitals.

"Even though social networking sites have grown over the years, some social groups, such as older men with low incomes and minorities, are not fully engaged with social networking and are less likely to obtain health information through these sites. Yet, we may still lack customized health education programs to target these people. This study helps to identify those social groups who are not making good use of social networking sites throughout the years," noted Feng.

Ajay Sethi, Ph.D., associate professor in the department of population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, agreed with the study's findings but noted, "Whenever a new technology or intervention is introduced to a population, the early adopters are typically distinct from the late or never adopters."

The volume of information on diseases and conditions on the Internet is huge compared to the number of websites that review doctors and hospitals and those websites. "Those sites, pertaining to providers tends to be buried," said Sethi. "A Google search of a hospital name, for example, will bring up lots of links, and if you add 'review' you'll probably pull up mostly anonymous individuals."

He suggested healthcare providers ought to ask their patients, in a non-accusatory way where they get their information. "That can spark a discussion as to what is credible and what may not be. Many health care systems offer links to health websites through their own site or provide informational pages for patients."

Explore further:Which couples who meet on social networking sites are most likely to marry?

More information: Yang Feng & Wenjing Xie (2014): Digital Divide 2.0: "The Role of Social Networking Sites in Seeking Health Information Online From a Longitudinal Perspective," Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives, DOI: 10.1080/10810730.2014.906522

Journal reference:Journal of Health Communication

Provided by Health Behavior News Service


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