Petroleum in Africa
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Can petroleum aid development?
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Mombasa workers protest possible closure of Kenya Petroleum Refinery - The Standard Digital News

Mombasa workers protest possible closure of Kenya Petroleum Refinery The Standard Digital News NAIROBI, KENYA: Hundreds of workers at Kenya Petroleum Refinery protested on Wednesday at the threatened closure of the facility, and possible conversion...
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Brad Pitt-Produced 'Big Men' Explores Greed in West African Oil Exploration | Movies News | Rolling Stone

Brad Pitt-Produced 'Big Men' Explores Greed in West African Oil Exploration | Movies News | Rolling Stone | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
Documentary premieres at the Tribeca Film Festival
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Coverage of the global networks is very important.  What of the voluntary nature of EITI, etc. and use as branding instruments?

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Shell returns to massively polluted Nigeria oil region

Shell returns to massively polluted Nigeria oil region | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
Shell on Thursday said it had launched a review of its oil and gas assets in Nigeria's massively polluted Ogoniland region, resuming work in the area two decades after unrest forced the company to pull out.
Arabica Robusta's insight:

Shell business as usual; blame the victims: fxn.ws/Xw0Vb1

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Some good background reading while waiting for the Kiobel decision

Some good background reading while waiting for the Kiobel decision | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
"This may be the week that the Supreme Court finally issues a decision in the landmark Alien Tort Statute case, Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum," international law expert John Bellinger  wrote on M...
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Ecuador auctions off Amazon to Chinese oil firms

Ecuador auctions off Amazon to Chinese oil firms | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
Indigenous groups claim they have not consented to oil projects, as politicians visit Beijing to publicise bidding process
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Shell accused of benefiting from South African apartheid-era land law

Shell accused of benefiting from South African apartheid-era land law | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
Campaigners say oil company is paying just 192 rand (£13.75) annual rent for two filling stations in impoverished KwaZulu-Natal
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allAfrica.com: Nigeria: Soyinka Backs Achebe On Civil War Memoir

allAfrica.com: Nigeria: Soyinka Backs Achebe On Civil War Memoir | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it

Nobel Laureate, Prof. Wole Soyinka, has backed his literary colleague, Prof. Chinua Achebe, in the raging controversy over the roles of some prominent Nigerians during the Nigerian civil war.

Soyinka, in an interview published in The Telegraph of London, but obtained by THISDAY yesterday, said the Igbo were victims of genocide during the three-year civil war, which was fought to break up Nigeria.

Achebe had stirred the hornet's nest in his civil war memoir, "There Was A Country", when among others, he accused wartime Head of State, Gen. Yakubu Gowon and the then Finance Minister, Chief Obafemi Awolowo, of carrying out a genocide against the Igbo.

The claim has generated considerable controversy, with many commentators accusing Achebe of re-writing history.

Soyinka, however, justified the secession bid and described Biafrans as "people who'd been abused, who'd undergone genocide, and who felt completely rejected by the rest of the community, and therefore decided to break away and form a nation of its own."

He also condemned religious militancy, saying now is the time to tackle Boko Haram, the insurgent group that has visited terror on the North, killing over 1,500 since 2009.


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Extreme Oil: Costly, Dirty and Dangerous (Klare)

Extreme Oil: Costly, Dirty and Dangerous (Klare) | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
The New “Golden Age of Oil” That Wasn’t Forecasts of Abundance Collide with Planetary Realities
By Michael T. Klare

Last winter, fossil-fuel enthusiasts began trumpeting the dawn of a new “golden age of oil” that would kick-start the American economy, generate millions of new jobs, and free this country from its dependence on imported petroleum. Ed Morse, head commodities analyst at Citibank, was typical. In the Wall Street Journal he crowed, “The United States has become the fastest-growing oil and gas producer in the world, and is likely to remain so for the rest of this decade and into the 2020s.”

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Pambazuka - How the international community has imposed medieval governance on Somalia

Somalia's new parliamentary leadership has effectively been booby trapped by a flawed governance model imposed by the international community.


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Ghana's oil worries | Pipe(line)Dreams

Ghana's oil worries | Pipe(line)Dreams | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it

"some of the back and forth between Ghanaian think tank, IMANI, and the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC). IMANI has recently published some interesting articles on the Jubilee field’s underperformance. In contrast to the excited tone of most of the business news about the country’s oil industry, the IMANI articles raise serious questions about the industry’s costs and prospects."

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Pipeline news | Pipe(line)Dreams

Pipeline news | Pipe(line)Dreams | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it

I often discuss the pipeline’s impact in Cameroon, but it’s important to remember that the situation in Chad is dismal. This “poverty reduction” project has been a complete disaster for the local population. Today there are more than 800 wells in the Doba field area although the original project plans included only 300 (See Chad Export Project Update No. 30. Mid-Year Report 2011, p.1; available at: http://www.esso.com/Chad-English/PA/Files/30_allchapters_eng.pdf).

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Chevron wins round one against Ecuador

Chevron wins round one against Ecuador | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
A recent decision by an international arbitration tribunal, administered by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, is a setback for Ecuador and for environmentalists that wish to use the ...
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Fuelling Poverty: a Film on the (Mis)Management of Nigeria's Oil Wealth

Fuelling Poverty: a Film on the (Mis)Management of Nigeria's Oil Wealth | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
I met Ishaya Bako during my last trip to Nigeria, on 13th January 2013 to be precise, at a lunch appointment with a friend in Wuse, Abuja. When I got to the Salamander Café by late afternoon, my fr...
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Clumsy attempts at censorship.

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Oil, Money and Secrecy in East Africa

Oil, Money and Secrecy in East Africa | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
Tom Rhodes, the Committee to Protect Journalists' East Africa Consultant, has written an interesting story on the secrecy surrounding oil development in Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan. Rhodes writes...
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Shell Warns of Environmental Cost of Oil Theft in Niger Delta

Shell Warns of Environmental Cost of Oil Theft in Niger Delta | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
Rising incidences of oil theft in Nigeria's oil producing Niger Delta come at a significant environmental cost, Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDSB) said Thursday.
Arabica Robusta's insight:

Shell always blames the people.

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Will Mozambique end up like Nigeria or Norway?

Will Mozambique end up like Nigeria or Norway? | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
What do the mineral finds mean for Mozambique? The BBC's Alexis Akwagyiram considers whether it will emulate Nigeria or Norway when the money starts to flow.

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Firoze Manji's curator insight, April 4, 2013 5:57 PM

What a stupid f'ing question. What do you think it's going to end up like!

Arabica Robusta's comment, April 6, 2013 8:18 AM
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Central African Republic and Chad

Central African Republic and Chad | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
What happens next in Central African Republic  is anyone's guess, but Chad is likely to remain an important player in CAR politics. Chad's president Idriss Deby "lost patience" with Francois Bozize...
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Exclusive: Chrétien played key role in controversial Chad oil deal

Exclusive: Chrétien played key role in controversial Chad oil deal | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
Former prime minister helped clinch energy pacts for Calgary company that wound up pleading guilty to bribery
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Firoze Manji's curator insight, February 6, 2013 8:47 AM

It constantly amazes me that we in the South are characterised as 'corrupt' when the scale of corruption manifested in the advanced capitalist countries is on an unimaginable scale.

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Chinua Achebe at 82: “We Remember Differently” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie | Bella Naija

Chinua Achebe at 82: “We Remember Differently” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie | Bella Naija | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
I have met Chinua Achebe only three times. The first, at the National Arts Club in Manhattan, I joined the admiring circle around him. A gentle-faced man in a
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Discursive Power and People's Movements: Why Chávez's Re-election is Important for Africa: Hakima Abbas

Discursive Power and People's Movements: Why Chávez's Re-election is Important for Africa: Hakima Abbas | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it

Discursive Power and People’s Movements:

Why Chávez’s Re-election is Important for Africa

Hakima Abbas

 

On October 7, 2012 President Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías of Venezuela was re-elected defeating conservative rival Henrique Capriles Radonski. It will be President Chávez’s third term in office under the 1999 constitution and his fourth election as Venezuelan president since 1998. Chávez won a clear majority in elections that were heralded as fair, peaceful and democratic. A stunning 97% of the population (over 19 million people) registered to vote and 82% of those registered, voted.

 

While global media conglomerates sought to wash over Chávez’s comfortable victory, African political commentators largely remained silent on the same. In contrast, there continues to be deserved attention to the U.S presidential electoral debates, campaigns and outcomes given the significant power of U.S policy on the lived realities of the majority of people globally be it as a result of their foreign policy, wars, economic power (though waning), their domination of Bretton Woods institutions or the U.S clout in international arena from Rio to Doha. However, the ideological debate and differences between both major contending political parties in the U.S boil down to nuance. These nuances can reverberate quite distinctly both nationally and internationally depending on the centrism of the representatives of these parties. The current incumbent President is in fact a centrist in relation to foreign policy, having continued and even extended the oil wars and the unflinching U.S support for the Zionist project, and in particular in relation to Africa where the militarism seems the order of the day. Indeed, President Obama’s domestic and international centrism has drawn much criticism but, with the hope that he embodies, miraculous transformation is still expected of him upon re-election.

 

On the other hand, at superficial reading, Venezuela appears to be an insignificant actor in Africa’s geo-political landscape. While a large overseas development donor, Venezuela’s aid, importantly framed as solidarity, is largely targeted at neighboring Latin American and Caribbean countries with much less significant contribution to Africa. That as it may be, Chávez was the first president of Latin America to declare himself of African descent, as important symbolically for Venezuela’s often marginalized population of African descent (who make up an estimated 34% of the population) and the entire region’s Afro-American community as Obama’s victory was for African-Americans in the United States. In an interview with Democracy Now in 2005, President Chávez reaffirmed the importance of these historic ties to the continent, stating: “And one of the greatest motherlands of all is no doubt, Africa. We love Africa. And every day we are much more aware of the roots we have in Africa. (....) Racism is very characteristic of imperialism. Racism is very characteristic of capitalism.” (Interview available at http://www.democracynow.org/2005/9/20/venezuelas_president_chavez_offers_cheap_oil).

 

Beyond the reaffirmation of historic connections, President Chávez has invested energies in the recognition of Africa as a strategic partner: over the years visiting countries never before visited by a Venezuelan president including South Africa, Mozambique, Algeria, Libya, Mali, Gambia, Benin and Angola. During his presidency, he has almost doubled the number of Venezuelan embassies in Africa and has entered into a number of agreements, which critically shift the monopoly of energy multinationals on the continent. Importantly in international forum, particularly at the United Nations, Chávez has recognized the importance of alliance with Africa and the potential clout of Africa bloc support.

 

However, during the oil price slump of 2008, Chávez drew criticism at home for not concentrating on internal Venezuelan affairs rather than drawing the wrath of imperialist states during long international speeches. He heeded this warning and cut back on international engagements and visits. However, maintained an important role in Latin American relations. His leadership of a significant power in the region created a domino effect and enabled the surfacing and victory of progressive parties from Ecuador to Argentina ending the decades of isolation of Cuba. Chávez has also been instrumental in creating and maintaining the alliance across South America (and to a lesser extent Meso-America and the Caribbean), which has enabled a weakening of North American clout and the building of alternative institutions, like Banco del Sur and the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of our America (ALBA), that capture the needs of the region and the will of its people.

 

Yet the key to the importance of President Chávez’s re-election for Africa lies strangely beyond Venezuela’s foreign policy and more so at the epicentre of its national struggle. The election in Venezuela stood in stark contrast to the campaigning in the U.S. The ideological differences between incumbent President Chávez and the opposition candidate Radonski is far from a nuance and instead represents clear ideological paths, values, interests, alliances and priorities. Their national policies are as distinct as their international allies. And the electorate of Venezuela has the choice within a strengthened democratized system to affirm not only a candidate but an ideological position. The fact is that Venezuelan people of all stripes are much more informed and actively engaged in the determination of their nation and peoples’ destiny than they have ever been before in modern times.

 

Far from superfluous, the international hyperbolic oration of President Chávez during his first term presented a critically Left voice that resonated globally with dormant forces including the peoples’ movements of Africa. The discursive power presented by Chávez’s leadership of an oil rich nation (therefore powerful in the energy dependent global North) cemented what is today a much needed voice in an otherwise frightening bipolarity of global discourse between, on the one hand imperialist neo-liberal powers in the Global North and, on the other, fundamentalist, conservative and populist forces of the Global South. With communism looking much more like capitalism and the economic inter-dependency of much of the world, the economic dominance of neo-liberalism was only hard shaken by the threat to accompanying infallibility of U.S. military dominance after September 11, 2001. The protracted War of Terror began. Indeed, last month, as the world drew up in flames of protest at the offensive depiction of Islam by a U.S based filmmaker, the narrative between neo-liberal and fundamentalist came again to the fore in a rabid display of the dominant political and ideological contest in the post-unipolar world.

 

Yet Chávez progressive discourse presents an alternative to both. Rabidly anti-imperialist but equally anti-conservative, Chávez offers, particularly to the peoples’ movements of Africa, a discourse that resounds on the streets of Guinea, the farms of Madagascar and the squares of Egypt. Indeed, the voice that has been most silenced after the massive acts of civil resistance in Tunisia and Egypt, are the progressive voices, neither Islamist nor militarized imperial puppet, seeking alternatives and long lasting solutions to the despair of post-independence African realities. From Zimbabwe to Kenya, Mali to South Africa, the quandary of false choices between the often populist rhetoric of anti-imperialism masking brutal fundamentalism on the one hand and the niceties of liberal rhetoric bellying the sustenance of subjugation on the other, leave little alternative space for African peoples’ to construct a vision and program of liberation for our times.

 

Chávez has been reluctant to criticise Global South leaders for any of their failings in leadership, understandably seeking allies amongst the few willing to openly oppose or resist the multiple layers of northern imperialism. However, with another six years to deepen the progressive agenda of not only Latin America and the Caribbean, but potentially the world, it will be critical that President Chávez and his administration consider supporting deepened solidarity between the peoples’ movements of Africa and the Americas to break the bipolarity of an increasingly belligerent world.

 


Via Firoze Manji
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Arabica Robusta's comment, October 28, 2012 7:05 AM
Is this an original article published on daraja.net? All the best.
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Oil companies gave cash and contracts to militants and warlords in Nigeria - August 26, 2012 | Platform London - Arts. Activism. Education. Research.

Oil companies gave cash and contracts to militants and warlords in Nigeria - August 26, 2012 | Platform London - Arts. Activism. Education. Research. | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
Shell and Chevron have funded armed militant groups in the volatile Niger Delta region of Nigeria since at least 2003, according to oil-industry sources an...

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Chofor Che's curator insight, February 26, 2013 8:26 AM

The tragedy behind oil in Africa. What a shame.

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Back to the Table, Egypt and the IMF

Back to the Table, Egypt and the IMF | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it
If the government’s concern is to improve Egyptians’ productive livelihoods and their ability to meet basic needs then none of the official reform proposals so far pass muster.

The loan is really about boosting investor confidence and attracting foreign capital, a top priority for the Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party."


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Kosmos Cameroon: Oil exploration in a national park? | Pipe(line)Dreams

Kosmos Cameroon: Oil exploration in a national park? | Pipe(line)Dreams | Petroleum in Africa | Scoop.it

Kosmos Energy’s activity in a conservation area is not unique. A new report issued by the WWF, the Center for the Environment and Development and RELUFA (Reseau de lutte contre la faim au Cameroun), Emerging Trends in Land-use Conflicts in Cameroon, reveals that “a total of at least 33 oil and mining permits have been granted inside of 16 different protected areas in Cameroon.”

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Chofor Che's curator insight, February 26, 2013 8:27 AM

How do we strike a balance between economic prosperity and environmental conservation?

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Chevron Corporation Supports Press Freedom and joins 2012 Courage in journalism Awards | VibeGhana.com

Chevron Corporation Supports Press Freedom and joins 2012 Courage in journalism Awards...
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