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A Simple Trick for Learning New Information

A Simple Trick for Learning New Information | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

A recent study in Memory & Cognition offers up an intriguing possibility about how to best learn: that learning with the expectation of teaching might be more effective than learning with the expectation that you'll be taking a test.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Students in an experiment appeared to do a better job learning when they thought they'd have to teach the material in question later on.


The idea of seeking, sensing and sharing information is the cornerstone of personal knowledge mastery. 

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, August 22, 2014 4:05 AM

An interesting experiment in learning: the study found that students achieved better results if they thought they would have to teach the topic to another student, than learning with the expectation they would be taking a test.


Perhaps the results are not too profound - if you're teaching you need to know far more about your subject than can be revealed in a test.

Personal Knowledge Mastery
Curated site about personal knowledge mastery and workplace learning for the 21st century.
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About Personal Knowledge Mastery

About Personal Knowledge Mastery | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

The purpose of this site - Personal Knowledge Mastery - is to give you insights into new ways of learning. 


Personal Knowledge Mastery (PKM) is an evolving concept for navigating change and learning to catch the waves before they break.


PKM helps people scan the external environment and making sure that they are seeing signals, patterns and trends that are going to have an impact on their company’s ability to continue to thrive and grow.


                                              ★★★★★


I believe that knowledge is everything. Knowledge is ideas. Knowledge is power. Knowledge is hope. 

But only if it is shared and applied.


That is why I created Personal Knowledge Mastery on Scoop.it. My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 

I'm co-founder of FutureShifts, a consultancy that helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, behaviors and organizational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.


You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen

Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

I hope you'll be inspired.

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth

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Learning, Development and Personal Growth

Alessandra Ginante argues that companies must do more to meet the personal needs and ambitions of their managers if they expect them to perform effectively.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The differentiating power of talent in business has never been so evident as a true source of sustainable competitive advantage. We now live in a time where the business tangibles such as products, factories and cash are quickly copied or readily available and business intangibles such as company culture, knowledge, reputation, brand, core competencies – strong drivers of economic value creation – are held mainly by people.


Given these circumstances, it is reasonable that companies that are able to nurture an environment where people can be self-actualised by gaining new talents while pursuing results meaningful to employees will more likely enjoy longer-lasting success.


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When Learning at Work Becomes Overwhelming

When Learning at Work Becomes Overwhelming | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

Many skilled jobs require a considerable amount of learning while doing, but learning requirements have reached unrealistic levels in many roles and work situations today.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The primary driver for new learning is increasingly complex and essential technologies. In their important book Race Against the Machine, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee argue that, because of recent advances in information technologies, we have entered a new phase of history. These MIT economists insist we’re now in a race between education and technology, if workers’ skills are to stay economically viable.


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16 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging Your Effort To Learn

16 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging Your Effort To Learn | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

Our own brains regularly deceive us in order to make sense of the world we live in. Most of the time, it’s nothing more than an innocent effort to save face. Our brain will tell us we’re smarter and better looking than everyone else, and that any fault brought to our attention should probably be blamed on someone else. It will advocate for our convictions, pointing out any evidence that supports them and politely ignoring any that doesn’t. And it will even spare us from the mental strain of thinking beyond the stereotypes it has so conveniently crafted for us. The human brain is our best friend, and our worst enemy, and unless we keep one eye peeled, it can hijack our learning completely.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

In this article Saga Briggs examines some of the “traps” the brain sets for us during the course of our careers, and what we can do to avoid them. Psychologists have already done the hard work of realising there’s any hijacking going on at all; what’s left for us to do is pay attention. 



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David Hain's curator insight, February 13, 12:21 PM

Understand your brain (and others) to develop real leverage in 21C jobs.

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Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload

Modern society is in a state of data deluge, and our brains are struggling to keep up with the demands of the digital age.

In 2011, we took in five times as much information every day as we did in 1986 – the equivalent of 175 newspapers. During our leisure time every day, each of us processes 34 gigabytes, or 100,000 words—and that’s not even counting our work.

The need to take charge of our attentional and memory systems has never been greater.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Award-wining author and neuroscientist Daniel Levitin visits the RSA to explain how our brains can organise this flood of information, and how we can harness that understanding to be more efficient, creative, happy and less stressed in an increasingly wired and distracted world.


Get a copy of Daniel's book "The Organized Mind" to learn more. You can also follow Daniel on Twitter here: @danlevitin



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How CEOs predict the future

How CEOs predict the future | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

To succeed in a global marketplace, business leaders need to know before it happens.



Via Matthew Jon Spaniol
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Leaders who don’t want to be blindsided by big shifts must be experts at anticipating and leveraging change. Reaction times and feedback loops have to get faster in order to deal with the acceleration in present society. 


In today’s VUCA environment, the challenge is to build skills that allow people to think critically and creatively, as well as to effectively process information, make decisions, manage conflict and engage in collaborative work in networks. Learning for change makers is much less about analysis of the past than it is about designing the future. Especially in times of fundamental systems change. Power is already shifting to those who master fast, relevant learning and are capable of transforming their insights into a competitive advantage.

 

If companies wish to strengthen their leadership capabilities, push for change, and support innovation, they must adopt more flexible learning methods and engage in facilitating flexible, goal-oriented learning that are adjusted to each individual’s unique needs, while ensuring that transformational learning is embedded in the organization. 

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Matthew Jon Spaniol's curator insight, January 29, 6:15 AM

"the use of big data and how it relates to scenario planning... involves an extension of that technique to connect different scenarios, to consider how they interact and look further into the future."

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Why Some People Are Better at Predicting the Future

Why Some People Are Better at Predicting the Future | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

Some people have better track records than others, and the ways in which they think about questions and arrive at their projections offer clues as to how the rest of us might become more successful forecasters.


Thinking style is important; people who are actively open-minded performed significantly better. They’re much more willing to consider unorthodox ideas or results, and to stray from the theories and beliefs they’re comfortable with.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The fascinating results of a tournament for people tasked with forecasting 199 world events.


Want to forecast the future? Adopt a learning mindset and work as part of a team (+establish a personal learning network). 



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Daniel Egger's curator insight, March 13, 8:53 PM

One of the key elements is to avoid bias thinking, which I cannot agree more with. The future is neutral, it is yet not written. Who will evaluate if it is positive or negative are the individuals that will live in it. We cannot we should not. If we do judge already in the present we limit our perspectives and even try to argue with logics that might yet not be true for the future context.

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What's a Healthier Option Than Mainstream News?

What's a Healthier Option Than Mainstream News? | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

No one needs a research study to know that mainstream news generally consists of reporting negative events. For example, the nightly news or morning paper will tell you about a train that derailed but not the thousands of trains that didn't. 


Especially if you're prone to anxiety, watching or reading mainstream news can be fear and anxiety inducing. Why does this matter? When the world seems dangerous, people are less likely to get out there and live their lives in interesting ways.

What's an alternative?  The alternative is to find media and other sources of information that are inspiring and give you a sense of general safety, optimism and abundant opportunity.



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

How to change your news and information diet…..

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How the Information Age Makes It Harder to Make Informed Choices About Risk

How the Information Age Makes It Harder to Make Informed Choices About Risk | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

Just because there is more information available doesn't ensure that we make more informed choices. The modern media provide information in ways that play right into the brain's instinct to do as little work as possible, including the work of getting that information, and thinking carefully about it.

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How Technology is Changing the Future of Learning

How Technology is Changing the Future of Learning | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

Slideshare presentation and a resourceful list of references from a presentation titled How Technology is Changing the Future of Learning by David Kelly. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

You can follow David on Twitter here: @LnDDave


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Crap Detection 101

The all-important literacy of determining the credibility of information found on the Internet.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

We need to go beyond skills to literacies, which includes:


  1. Attention
  2. Participation
  3. Cooperation
  4. Critical Consumption
  5. Network Awareness


A fine video by Howard Rheingold. 

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David Hain's curator insight, November 22, 2014 5:06 AM

Essential skill for coaching, relationship building, collaboration as well as knowledge management.  How's your crap detector?

Stephen Dale's curator insight, November 24, 2014 5:55 AM

Harold Rheingold - always worth listening to. 

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The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in an Age of Information Overload

The information age is drowning us with an unprecedented deluge of data. At the same time, we’re expected to make more - and faster - decisions about our lives than ever before. 


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Visualization for Understanding

Visualization for Understanding | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

In this blog post Harold Jarche introduces Value network analysis as a methodology for understanding, using, visualizing, optimizing internal and external value networks and complex economic ecosystems.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

For further information see also:


1. http://www.valuenetworksandcollaboration.com/analysis.html

2. http://www.vernaallee.com/images/vaa-vnaandvalueconversionjit.pdf


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Big Thinkers: Alvin Toffler

This episode features Alvin Toffler. He is an American writer and futurist, known for his works discussing the digital revolution, communications revolution, corporate revolution and technological singularity.


A former associate editor of Fortune magazine, his early work focused on technology and its impact (through effects like information overload). Then he moved to examining the reaction of and changes in society.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Alvin Toffler coined the term “information overload,” and painted a picture of people who were isolated and depressed, cut off from human intimacy by a relentless fire hose of messages and data barraging us relentlessly.


The future he was looking at in 1970 is now. And yes, we live in an era of data fire hoses and sometimes we all feel either overwhelmed or trapped. Technology is far more ubiquitous than Toffler could possibly have imagined.


But we are not isolated by it.  The same technologies  used to hurl messages at us simultaneously provide us with tools to filter out what we don’t want to see and make sense of things.


This is a highly relevant video to watch for anyone interested in personal knowledge mastery. 


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Cultivating the Entrepreneurial Learner for the 21st Century

Cultivating the Entrepreneurial Learner for the 21st Century | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

We are moving away from a 20tth century notion of learning as constantly reinventing and augmenting your skills. In the past, your skillset was authoritative, transferred to you in delivery models – often called schooling – and had wonderful scalable efficiency. How do we move from that transfer model of fixed assets to a model that requires participating in ever-changing flows of activities and knowledge? How do you move from being like a steamship that sets course and keeps going for a long time, to what you might call whitewater kayaking?

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

We need to teach people to want to constantly learn new types of things, because that is the world that we are moving into – a world of constant and rapid

change. The key for is getting students

to play with knowledge.


This is a highly recommendable paper written by John Seely Brown. John is one of my favorite authors. Along with John Hagel and Lang Davison he wrote The Power of Pull: How Small Moves, Smartly Made, Can Set Big Things in Motion.


Read also this previous Scoop: The Value of Scalable Learning, Or How a Hardcore Geek Became a Softy.

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New Ways of Working in the Post-Knowledge Era

How is the world of business changing, and what will the leading companies of the future look like?


In this talk, Professor Julian Birkinshaw argues that we are nearing the end of the “knowledge era” that has dominated for the last forty years. Of course knowledge will always be important, but in a world where information is ubiquitous and knowledge is increasingly shared, the companies that want to gain a competitive edge will have to look for new sources of advantage.


Birkinshaw argues their two key imperatives are action and conviction: they will be smart about scanning for information and harnessing the knowledge of their employees, but they will favour action over analysis, and they will privilege emotional conviction over purely rational judgments.



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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, March 10, 11:46 AM

This shift has enormous implications for how work is done, because action and conviction are not the focus of traditional hierarchical organisations.


Birkinshaw also describes the new management models that will be needed so that your company can harness the new sources of advantage in the post-knowledge era.


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Does anyone make accurate geopolitical predictions?

Does anyone make accurate geopolitical predictions? | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

How well do people make intuitive predictions?


Researchers say the answer is disappointing. Medical diagnoses are sometimes wrong, economic forecasts are often mistaken, and many stock market pickers generate returns that fall below the market average.


Is this also true with geopolitical forecasts?


From instability in the Middle East to the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine to continuing concern about economic and security implications of the rise of China, understanding what is most likely to happen – and why – is an issue of vital interest for the U.S. government, as well as other governments and companies around the world.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Intelligence about the future is a key resource for building robust strategic trajectories for companies. We live in a world that increasingly requires what psychologist Howard Gardner calls searchlight intelligence” – the ability to discern connections across spheres.


This article makes a strong case for personal knowledge mastery. 


The new competitive edge comes from interactive capacity: the ability to connect with information and people, as and when needed through a professional approach to personal knowledge mastery. 


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Accomplish More by Committing to Less

Accomplish More by Committing to Less | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

Believing that more is always more is a dangerous assumption.

There’s a cost to complexity.


Every time you commit to something new, you not only commit to doing the work itself, but also remembering to do the work, dealing with the administrative overhead, and to getting it all done in the time constraints involved.


The unfortunate result of taking on everything that comes your way is that you end up spend more of your time managing the work and less time investing in truly immersing yourself in what’s most important and satisfying.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

What to consider before taking on a new project. Elizabeth Grace Saunders is author of How to Invest Your Time Like Money. In this blog post she offers five steps you can take to prevent overloading your plate:


  • Create a pause.
  • Say “no” early and often.
  • Think through the project.
  • Review your calendar.
  • Adjust your commitments.



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The Power of Noticing: What the best leaders see

The Power of Noticing: What the best leaders see | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

The difference between seeing and observing is fundamental to many aspects of life. Indeed, we can learn a lot from how Sherlock Holmes thinks. Noticing is even something that Nassim Taleb has chimed in on with Noise and Signal.


In the video, Harvard Business School Professor Max Bazerman, author of The Power of Noticing: What the Best Leaders See, discusses how important it is not just to be able to focus, but to be a good noticer as well. What he’s really talking about is observation.



Via Anne Leong
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Read this article and watch the video to get a better understanding on the power of noticing and the difference between seeing and observing.


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Miguel Herrera E.'s curator insight, January 27, 8:25 AM

La observación requiere de enfocar la atención, discriminar diferencias, similitudes, fugacidad y permanencia, ver lo que existe y no lo que deseamos exista.

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How your "working memory" makes sense of the world

How your "working memory" makes sense of the world | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

Life comes at us very quickly, and what we need to do is take that amorphous flow of experience and somehow extract meaning from it.


In this funny, enlightening talk, educational psychologist Peter Doolittle details the importance - and limitations -- of your "working memory," that part of the brain that allows us to make sense of what's happening right now.


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The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now

The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

Tomorrow’s learning is already available. Here are 7 of the most compelling and powerful trends, concepts, and resources that represent its promise.

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, January 23, 2014 9:27 AM

Seven key principles for tomorrow's learning:

1. Digital & Research Literacy

2. Shift From Standards To Habits

3. Game-Based Learning & Gamification

4. Connectivism.

5. Transparency

6. Place-Based Education 

7. Self-Directed Learning & Play

 A useful article
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 8, 2014 9:03 PM

We will need to read Dewey about play and community. A couple of others who might want to read are Habermas, Gadamer, and Montessori.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Mastery and Transformation

Mastery and Transformation | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

In moving toward mastery, you are bringing your mind closer to reality and to life itself. Anything that is alive is in a continual state of change and movement. The moment that you rest, thinking that you have attained the level you desire, a part of your mind enters a phase of decay. You lose your hard-earned creativity and others being to sense it. This is a power and intelligence that must be continually renewed or it will die.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

A fine blog post by Si Alhir(@SAlhir) about Robert Greene‘s (@RobertGreene) book: Mastery


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How to Recognize Snake Oil in Your Personal Learning Network

How to Recognize Snake Oil in Your Personal Learning Network | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

We’re all selling ourselves. Every one of us. This isn’t a bad thing; it’s just something we need to be aware of in the context of personal learning networks.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

When people are strategic about building and leveraging their personal learning networks, they are also (or at least, they should be) very conscious about managing their personal brand. Your personal persona, especially online, and the image you portray are what makes you attractive to connect with. The “selling process” of personal learning networks is the efforts individuals take to not only connect with others, but to create an image around themselves so that others will want to connect with them.


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How to Keep Learning and Still Have a Life

How to Keep Learning and Still Have a Life | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

As we enter an age of understanding we must become perpetual students. For organizations the challenge is to create a workplace where people’s jobs become their classes. The November edition of HBR takes a look at three new books related to the future of learning. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The November edition of HBR takes a look at three new books related to the future of learning. 

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The importance of curation to your professional life

The importance of curation to your professional life | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

The problem we face here isn’t one of not having enough information, the problem is locating the relevant information amidst the sea of irrelevant.  Thus the ability to filtrate and curate information is invaluable.


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3 Rules to Spark Learning

3 Rules to Spark Learning | Personal Knowledge Mastery | Scoop.it

It took a life-threatening condition to jolt chemistry teacher Ramsey Musallam out of ten years of “pseudo-teaching” to understand the true role of the educator: to cultivate curiosity. In a fun and personal talk, Musallam gives 3 rules to spark imagination and learning, and get students excited about how the world works.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Now that's the spirit. A fine TED Talk by Ramsey Musallam on the importance of cultivating curiosity. 


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